Author Archives: Underground Crafter

About Underground Crafter

My name is Marie Segares and I’ve been crafty for a long time. My maternal grandmother taught me most of the needlearts at a young age, but the only one I’ve done continuously since childhood is crochet. As an adult, I picked up (again) sewing, quilting, embroidery, and knitting. My parents were also big creative influences, especially my dad, who is a fine artist. He had a kind of creativity “boot camp” program in place after school, on weekends, and in the summer time. (He was the Drill Sergeant, and I was the new recruit, in case you were wondering.) I live and work in New York City and am currently on the endangered species list as a Native New Yorker. By day, I work in higher education administration/college access. By night (and weekend) I make cool creative stuff and teach people to do the same.

Interview with Andres Nevarez (Hispanic Heritage Month Series)

Interview with crochet/knit blogger/designer Andy Nevarez on Underground Crafter

I’m excited to kick off my 2014 Hispanic Heritage Month series with an interview with Andres Nevarez, also known as Crafty Andy. Andy is a crochet and knitting designer and blogger. He can be found online on his Crafty Andy website and blog, Pinterest, Facebook, on Twitter as @Crafty_Andy, Flickr, and Ravelry (as CraftyAndy and on his designer page). Andy also has some great videos on YouTube, and his Tapestry crochet work was featured on Carol Ventura‘s Tapestry Crochet blog here. (I previously interviewed Carol here.)

All images are copyright Andy Nevarez unless otherwise noted, and are used with permission. Click on the photos to visit that pattern’s page on Ravelry.

This post contains affiliate links.

Interview with crochet/knit blogger/designer Andy Nevarez on Underground Crafter

Andy Nevarez’s Enconium, A Lace Scarf knitting pattern.

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you first learn to crochet and knit?

Andy: I honestly don’t remember when I learned to crochet, but I picked it up around the year 2000 or so. I had some help from a friend that knew how to crochet well. I did a lot of pot holders and wash cloths, then graduated to afghans.

I learned to knit around 1988, when I was on bed rest for about a month. I asked a friend to take me to Woolworth’s to get a book and some needles. I taught myself to knit, and believe it or not, my first project was a sweater.

Interview with crochet/knit blogger/designer Andy Nevarez on Underground Crafter

Andy’s Capello Di Lana crochet pattern.

UC: What inspired you to start designing?

Andy: The inspiration to start designing came from the fact that I love hats. My love for hats sent me into a search for men’s hats and I did not like anything that I saw that was crochet. The crochet hats that I found on the internet were very interesting, from Kufis, toques, beanies to fancy kippahs. I wanted something stylish, unique and challenging and that is how I got into designing Tapestry crochet hats.

There were a lot of knitted hat patterns, but I was only focusing on making crochet hats at the time. I started crocheting hats and decided to go into Tapestry crochet. At the time, I did not know it was called that. I was bored with just one color and decided to play with two colors in hats. Almost everyone that knows me knows me by my hats. Carol Ventura was the first Tapestry Crocheter that I was inspired by. These are some of my Tapestry crochet designs.

Interview with crochet/knit blogger/designer Andy Nevarez on Underground Crafter

Andy’s Heracles Lace Scarf knitting pattern.

UC: You have roughly an equal amount of crochet and knitting patterns. Is that something you have done intentionally or just a happy accident?

Andy: More intentionally than accident. I have so many ideas for hats in my head, either in knit or crochet. Whenever I am looking at yarn, the first thoughts that cross my mind are how can I make a hat out of these skeins, what shape will it take? The same goes with lace scarves for men. What kind of lace pattern can I make with this yarn that I want to wear.

Interview with crochet/knit blogger/designer Andy Nevarez on Underground Crafter

Pythagoras Cap, a crochet design by Andy Nevarez.

UC: You talk about living with AIDS and being a longterm HIV survivor on your blog. What kind of reaction have you received in the yarn crafts community about your status, as well as your fundraising efforts for Project Open Hand?

Andy: My status as HIV/AIDS person does not come up, unless I see it fit to come into the picture. I guess the biggest surprise is the fact that I have an AIDS diagnosis and I “look normal” or “healthy,” whatever that means. I do not complain about things unless it is to my doctor, which is the person I need to complain to or rather than complain, let him know what is up with my body, my aches and pains. I am not a complainer. I make the best out of everything in my life and being HIV/AIDS is just a piece of the 1001 pieces puzzle that is Andy.

My Project Open Hand efforts have not raised lots of money yet. My friend Kyle Kunnecke mentioned that he was making a hat called Cause and would ‘t it be nice if there was a crochet version. Well, what a great opportunity for me to give back and take a colorwork challenge. I am hoping my hat pattern will outlive me for hundreds of years or until there is a cure.

Interview with crochet/knit blogger/designer Andy Nevarez on Underground Crafter

Ribbons, a crochet hat design by Andy Nevarez.

UC: What was the yarn crafts scene like in your community in Puerto Rico when you were growing up?

Andy: Well, people – men, women and children – that craft with yarn are artisans or apprentices. There are different levels of craftsmanship and techniques.   Everyone likes to see people make things by hand. People are always curious about how things are made.

UC: How does it compare to the current scene in San Francisco?

Andy: I have had a mostly positive experience with my crafts. A lot of people look down at crochet, believe it or not. I consider myself to be the Tapestry Crochet Ambassador and nobody puts down my work. Most people that see one of my hats think that they are knit, not that it matters. San Francisco makes me feel like an Artisan. I make hats that are wearable art, sculptures made out of yarn, a mosaic of color to make the mind wander.

UC: If you’re still in touch with crafters on the island, do you know anything about the current yarn crafts scene there?

Andy: The times that I have knit or crochet in public on the Island, I get so many people that come to take a closer look at what I am doing. They ask me questions and admire my work, and they talk to me with a silent kind of respect. People actually acknowledge the fact that I am Artisan. People in San Francisco are very kind as well. They are not really surprised that I am a man that crafts, they are more surprised that a lot of my pieces are crochet.

The one thing I know about the craft scene on the Island is mundillo. This is a craft of handmade bobbin lace and is mostly done by women. I have never seen a man making mundillo.

Interview with crochet/knit blogger/designer Andy Nevarez on Underground Crafter

Thermopylae Scarf, a crochet pattern by Andy Nevarez.

UC; Does your cultural background influence your crafting? If so, how?

Andy: Of course it does. There are some [Hispanic] artisans that have inspired me and I still get inspiration from: Juan Gris, Pablo Picasso, Frida Kahlo.

I like to think outside the box, I like to be daring, creative and make people think about the beauty that can be created. These artists had to think outside the box. Part of me likes earth tones, but there is that part of me that likes bright contrasting colors, orange and blue, teal and fuchsia.

UC: What are your favorite knitting and crochet books in your collection?

Andy: Elizabeth Zimmermann’s Knitting Without Tears, Barbara G. Walker‘s A Treasury of Knitting Patterns book collection, and More Tapestry Crochet by Carol Ventura.

UC: Are there any Spanish- or English-language crafty websites/blogs you visit regularly for inspiration or community?

Andy: I visit Tapestry Crochet, Men Who Knit, TECHKnitting, and Ravelry. I get a lot of inspiration from what surrounds me as well. Even though my first language is Spanish, I have no idea how to crochet or knit in Spanish yet.

Interview with crochet/knit blogger/designer Andy Nevarez on Underground Crafter

Andy’s Tempo Crochet Caps, published by Skacel. (Image (c) Skacel.)

UC: What’s next for Crafty Andy?

Andy: I want to share my love of crafts with other people. I am an introvert of sorts, yet my desire to connect with people is bigger than my introversion. I live life to the fullest and live without regrets. There are plenty of pattern ideas for hats and scarves in my head, waiting to come out and see the light. I can say there will be more knitted lace scarves and stoles from me. There will be more Tapestry crochet hats and knitted hats.

I have been featured at the Malabrigo website  and I have a pattern published by Skacel. Is there a book in my future? Probably so, but the way that it will probably happen is that I will start writing and will not stop until it’s done. It will be in spurts, which is kind of a contradiction to what I just said, but that is my kind of energy. I work when I am inspired, and in the meantime I collect data.

Thanks so much for stopping by, Andy, and for sharing your designs and artistry with us!

Free Pattern: El Guaba

El Guaba, free wrap pattern by Underground Crafter with U.S. pattern abbreviations

Earlier this year, I was invited by the yarn dyer, Stitchjones, to create a one-skein project for her Yarnageddon 2014 Yarn Club. (She’s currently taking sign up for her 2015 club here.) I didn’t have any project idea in mind until the yarn arrived. The yarn is a stunning and vibrant semi-solid red, and my picture doesn’t do it justice. Sharon (a.k.a. Stitchjones) included a note saying that the yarn club (and therefore, pattern) theme was “Real Life Wild Women.”

Stitchjones yarn featured in free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

This post contains affiliate links.

I immediately knew I had to make something inspired by Celia Cruz, who was known as the Queen of Latin Music and La Guarachera de Cuba. I have countless childhood memories of hearing Celia’s music in the background while visiting my paternal grandparents. I even listen to her songs in my iPod to this day. In addition to her music, Celia was a fashion icon, known for her wild stage costumes, hair, and neckware. (If you’re not that familiar with Celia, you may want to check out my Celia Cruz Pinterest board to see what I mean, or watch this 3-1/2 minute bio on YouTube.)

Celia Cruz Pinterest board inspiring free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

Just a small preview of my Celia Cruz Pinterest board.

One of my favorite Celia Cruz songs is “El Guaba” from her 1986 album, La Candela. You can check out a live performance of “El Guaba” from the PBS special, Celia Cruz & Friends: A Night of Salsa, recorded in 1998 when Celia was 73(!) on YouTube here.

So, what exactly is El Guaba? Well, it’s a whip spider. And that’s when the inspiration for the pattern hit me. I combined octagons (because there’s one side for each spider leg) to create a simple wrap to wear over any outfit to add a bit of Celia glam to your day. Many of us are not necessarily going to dye our hair blue or wear a dress that looks like a piano, but nonetheless, there are moments when we’d still like to be in the spotlight! I’m sharing the pattern here free on my blog to kick off my celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month 2014. I’ll be continuing my annual series, interviewing Hispanic crochet and knitting designers, bloggers, and makers. I hope you enjoy the pattern and the series!

El Guaba Crochet Pattern

By Underground Crafter

02-easy 50US terms 50 4-medium 50Crochet a quick wrap using octagonal motifs, an homage to the titular whip spider in Celia Cruz’s “El Guaba.”

Finished Size: Fits bust size (after blocking): XS (28-30”/71-76 cm), [S/M (32-38”/81-96.5 cm), L/XL (40- 46”/101.5-117 cm), 2X (48-50”/122-127), 3X (52-54”/132-137), 4X (56-58”/142-147 cm), and 5X (60-62”/152-158)]. Pictured sample is 2X.

Materials:

  • Stitchjones Big Sky Bulky (100% Montana Targhee wool, 4.75 oz/138 g/220 yds/201 m) – 1, [1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2] skein(s) Power Reds, or approximately 200 – 360 yards (183 – 329 m) in any medium weight yarn.
  • I-9/5.5 mm crochet hooks, or any size needed to obtain correct gauge.
  • Yarn needle.

  • Gauge: 1 motif = 5” (13 cm) before blocking. For best fit, check your gauge.

El Guaba, free crochet pattern from Underground Crafter with U.S. pattern abbreviations.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern:

  • BLO – back loop only
  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • ea – each
  • hdc – half double crochet
  • rep – repeat
  • Rnd(s) – Round(s)
  • RS – right (front) side
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • sp – space
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • tr – treble crochet
  • yo – yarn over
  • *+ Rep the instructions following the asterisk and/or plus sign as indicated

Pattern Instructions:

Center Octagon – Make 1

  • Ch 4, join to first st with sl st to form ring.
  • Rnd 1: (RS) Ch 3 (counts as dc, here and throughout), 15 dc in ring, join with sl st to BLO of top of first ch 3. (16 sts)
  • Rnd 2: Ch 1, 2 scBLO in same st and in ea st around, join with sl st to first sc. (32 sts)
  • Rnd 3: Ch 7 (counts as dc + ch-4 sp), sk 3 sts, *dc in next st, ch 4, sk 3 sts; rep from * around, join with sl st to third ch of first ch 7. (8 sts + 8 ch-4 sp)
  • Rnd 4: Sl st in next ch-4 sp, *(2 sc, dc, ch 2, dc, 2 sc) in ch-4 sp; rep from * around, join with sl st to BLO of first sc. (64 sts)
  • Rnd 5: Ch 3, dcBLO in next st, hdcBLO in next st, *(sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp, hdcBLO in next st,** dcBLO in next 4 sts, hdcBLO in next st; rep from * around, ending last rep at **, dcBLO in next 2 sts, join with sl st to top of first ch 3. Fasten off. (64 sts + 8 ch-2 sp)
El Guaba, free crochet pattern from Underground Crafter with U.S. pattern abbreviations.

First Octagon (left) and Joining Octagon (right) before blocking.

Joining Octagon – Make 3 [4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

  • Rep through Rnd 2 as for Center Octagon.
  • Rnd 3: Ch 3, dc in next 3 sts, *ch 2,** dc in next 4 sts; rep from * around, ending last rep at **, join with sl st to BLO of top of first ch 3. (32 sts + 8 ch-2 sp)
  • Rnd 4: Ch 1, scBLO in same st and in next 3 sts, *(dc, ch 2, dc) in ch-2 sp,** scBLO in next 4 sts; rep from * around, ending last rep at**, join with BLO to top of first sc. (48 sts + 8 ch-2 sp)
  • Rnd 5: Ch 3, dcBLO in next 3 sts, hdcBLO in next st, *(sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp, hdcBLO in next st, dcBLO in next 4 sts, hdcBLO in next st; rep from * 5 more times, (sc, ch 1, join to RS of previous octagon with sc through ch-2 sp, sc) in ch-2 sp, hdcBLO in next st, dcBLO in next 4 sts, hdcBLO in next st, (sc, join with sc through next ch-2 sp of previous octagon, ch 1, sc) in ch-2 sp, hdcBLO in next st, join with sl st to top of first ch 3. Fasten off. (64 sts + 8 ch-2 sp)

El Guaba, free crochet pattern from Underground Crafter with U.S. pattern abbreviations.

Final Octagon – Make 1

  • Rep through Rnd 4 as for Joining Octagon.
  • Rnd 5: Ch 3, dcBLO in next 3 sts, hdcBLO in next st, +(sc, ch 1, join to RS of previous octagon with sc through ch-2 sp, sc) in ch-2 sp, hdcBLO in next st, dcBLO in next 4 sts, hdcBLO in next st, (sc, join with sc through next ch-2 sp of previous octagon, ch 1, sc) in ch-2 sp, hdcBLO in next st, *(sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp, hdcBLO in next st, dcBLO in ea of next 4 sts, hdcBLO in next st; rep from * 3 more times, rep from + to * once, join with sl st to top of first ch 3. Fasten off. (64 sts + 8 ch-2 sp)

Top Edging

  • Rnd 1: With RS facing and starting at 2nd (3rd, 3rd, 4th, 4th, 5th, 5th) octagon from Center Octagon, join with sl st to st before first ch-2 sp on flat edge, ch 1, sc in same st, *sl st in ch-2 sp, sl stBLO in next 8 sts, sl st in next ch-2 sp, sc in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st, hdc in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st, ch 1, sk 1 sts, yo twice, insert hook in next st, +yo and draw up a loop, (yo and draw through 2 loops) twice,++ yo twice, insert hook in second st after next ch-2 sp on next octagon, rep from + to ++, yo and draw through 3 loops, ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st, hdc in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st,** sc in next st, rep from * around, ending last rep at **, join with sl st to BLO of top of first sc.
  • Rnd 2: Ch 2 (counts as hdc), *scBLO in ea of next 10 sts, hdcBLO in next st, dcBLO in ea of next 11 sts,** hdcBLO in next st; rep from * around, ending last rep at **, join with sl st to top of ch 2. Fasten off.

Finishing

  • Weave in ends with yarn needle. Spray or wet block. 

If you like this pattern, show it some love on Ravelry here.

© 2014 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use it to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2014/09/15/free-pattern-el-guaba/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Hispanic Heritage Month Interview Series

2014 Hispanic Heritage Month interview series with crocheters and knitters on Underground Crafter

I’m really excited to announce the kick off of my third annual Hispanic Heritage Month interview series with crocheters and knitters! You can read more about my inspiration for starting the series in 2012 here, or check out my roundups for 2012 here and for 2013 here with links to all the interviews.

I’ll be talking with some great crocheters and knitters here on the blog for the next month. You can see the interview schedule below.

  • Tuesday, September 16: Andy Nevarez
  • Thursday, September 18: Adriana Hernandez
  • Tuesday, September 23: Melissa Martinez
  • Wednesday, September 24: Andrea Sanchez
  • Thursday, September 25: Victor Noel Lopez
  • Tuesday, September 30: Trelly Hernandez
  • Wednesday, October 1: Leticia Jimenez
  • Thursday, October 2: Bianca Perez
  • Tuesday, October 7:  Joji Locatelli
  • Wednesday, October 8:  Adriana Aguirre
  • Thursday, October 9: Rosalia Fauste
  • Monday, October 13: Sol Maldonado
  • Tuesday, October 14: Susana from Creaciones Susana
  • Wednesday, October 15: Fabi Woerner

Most of the interviews were conducted in English but a few were translated from Spanish. In some cases, I have made edits to grammar and style to make the interviews more readable in English.

And, though it seems early, I’m always planning ahead for the next Hispanic Heritage Month interview series! Let me know if you have a favorite Hispanic or Latino/a crochet or knitting designer, teacher, maker, or blogger you’d like me to feature in the comments. Enjoy!

Review: Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet on Craftsy

Dora Ohrenstein's Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet Craftsy class reviewed by Underground Crafter

This post contains affiliate links. Although I’m a Craftsy affiliate, and I earn a small commission (at no additional cost to you) when you click through the links I share to Craftsy and make a purchase, I paid to take this course and, as always, the review is based entirely on my honest opinions.

This must be Tunisian crochet week on my blog! (Check out my mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her new book, Tunisian Crochet for Baby, here.)

I recently completed Dora Ohrenstein’s Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet class on Craftsy. In the past, I’ve interviewed Dora on my blog here and shared reviews of two of her books, Custom Crocheted Sweaters (review here) and The New Tunisian Crochet (review here). She let me know back in May when the class was first available, but I didn’t have time to sit down and watch it until recently.

The class includes 7 lessons:

Lesson 1: Tunisian Basics (29:32 minutes) provides a refresher of two basic Tunisian crochet stitches (Tunisian knit and Tunisian simple stitches), increasing, decreasing, counting rows, starting a base row, the standard return pass, and the slip stitch bind off. I enjoyed learning more about Dora’s method for decreasing, and actually incorporated the technique into one of my own designs.

The video in this section alternates between close ups and more conversational views of Dora talking.

Dora Ohrenstein's Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet Craftsy class reviewed by Underground Crafter

Dora providing a refresher of basic Tunisian crochet stitches.

Lesson 2: Tunisian Tools (13:43 minutes) includes an overview of different yarns and hooks for Tunisian crochet. Dora emphasizes choosing tools for the best drape. She also talks about gauge and provides some tips for getting the right gauge in this section.

Lesson 3: Measuring for a Perfect Fit (23:12 minutes) applies to any type of handmade garment measuring.

Dora Ohrenstein's Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet Craftsy class reviewed by Underground Crafter

Dora demonstrating proper measurement techniques.

Dora shows the correct way to take measurements from a body, her dress form Claudette, and existing garments. This section is very helpful, especially for those of us that haven’t had a lot of experience with doing measurements and want to create the great fit. You can see Dora wearing the vest project for this class in the picture above. You can buy a kit for the vest here, and the pattern is only available through the class.

Lesson 4: Adjusting the Pattern (23:04 minutes) is a detailed walk through of the pattern. The video in this section usually focuses on the pattern itself, with relevant areas highlighted or enlarged while Dora talks about that component. While this is obviously specifically about the vest pattern, Dora shares a lot of information about fitting, pattern alternations, and understanding schematics that could apply to any pattern you may work with in the future.

Dora Ohrenstein's Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet Craftsy class reviewed by Underground Crafter

In Lesson 5: Custom-Fit Calculations: Bust & Shoulder (35:53 minutes) and Lesson 6: Custom Fit Considerations: Waist & Hip (18:40 minutes), Dora goes into further detail about how to customize the pattern to fit your body (or the body of someone you are gifting or selling the finished project to). In these section, she talks about ease, measurements, how to adjust increases, decreases, and stitch counts, and (don’t be afraid, Americans) provides a review of the math necessary. She shows her math equations on screen (as well as the times she counts on her fingers) so that even those who are uncomfortable with math should be able to use these lessons to alter the pattern.

Dora Ohrenstein's Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet Craftsy class reviewed by Underground Crafter

In Lesson 7: Finishing Details (35:02), Dora goes over everything required to make your finished vest look “professional” – blocking, seaming, edging, cleaning, and so on.

At $29.99 with just under 3 hours of video, this class is a great value. In addition to the video lessons, the vest pattern, and some additional handouts, you have the opportunity to interact with fellow students and ask Dora questions. Unlike a face-to-face class, you can return to the videos again and again over time.

Although the class is focused on the vest pattern, Dora shares a lot of general information about gauge, fitting, measurements, altering patterns, and finishing that can apply to any project. She has a very calm voice and shares her sense of humor with the class on several occasions.

The only changes I’d like to see in the class are consistent with what I would like to see changed in Craftsy classes in general. I wish they would edit the videos into shorter segments, or break them up with music or visuals more often. Yes, of course, I can pause at any time, but as someone with an increasingly short video attention span (thanks a lot, YouTube!), I found the segments pretty long for watching straight through. I also wish there was more variety in the actual filming. The class basically alternates between watching Dora behind a desk, over the shoulder close ups (of her hands, the pattern being annotated, etc.) and Dora standing to take measurements. I wish there was more variety in backgrounds and use of illustrations or animation. These aren’t deal breakers – as I said, it is consistent with the way Craftsy classes are filmed. They tend to look like public television craft shows filmed on a static set, rather than funky videos you might find elsewhere online.

Overall, I highly recommend this course to anyone who wants to go beyond the basics in Tunisian crochet; crocheters who struggle with (or fear) custom fitting, measurements, and the math behind alterations; and fans of Dora’s work who haven’t had a chance to take a class with her. You can sign up for Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet (with Dora Ohrenstein) here!

Blog Tour: Tunisian Crochet for Baby – Mini Interview with Sharon Silverman

This post contains affiliate links.

I’m excited to share a mini interview with Sharon Silverman today as part of her blog tour for Tunisian Crochet for Baby. Sharon is a designer, author, and instructor based in West Chester, Pennsylvania. Tunisian Crochet for Baby is her seventh crochet book, and she has more in the works. I previously interviewed Sharon here and she wrote a guest post here.

Like me, Sharon is a professional member of the Crochet Guild of America, and she is also a design member of The National NeedleArts Association. You can find her online on her website, on Ravelry (as CrochetSharon or on her designer page), on Facebook, and on Pinterest. I’ll also be sharing a giveaway for the new book at the end of this post, so read on for details!

Mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her book Tunisian Crochet for Baby on Underground Crafter blog.

Sharon Silverman

Underground Crafter (UC): What was your inspiration for writing Tunisian Crochet for Baby?

Sharon: On the design side, I have been a huge fan of Tunisian crochet ever since I came upon it in a stitch dictionary. It lets me create all sorts of fabrics and textures that are impossible in regular crochet. I am always glad to find an opportunity to share Tunisian techniques with other crocheters. Baby items, including garments, are very popular and seemed to be the logical next step after my books on scarves and pillows (both from Stackpole Books), and a Leisure Arts title, Tunisian Baby Blankets.

Mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her book Tunisian Crochet for Baby.

Washcloth Quartet.

UC: In your guest post, you mentioned some of the things you love about the look of Tunisian crochet. What about it do you find especially suited to baby projects?

Sharon: Because of their small size, baby projects aren’t too intimidating. The investment in time and materials is much less than it would be for something like an adult sweater. Baby items present a unique opportunity to learn a new skill and end up with a great finished project that can be crocheted quickly. Tunisian crochet stitch patterns seem very well suited to baby items, refreshingly different from typical double crochet fabric. I think crocheters will welcome the opportunity to try these new designs.

And with new babies entering the world all the time, crocheters always need things to make for those precious bundles! I included a variety of items to fit different skill levels, styles, and sizes from newborn through 12 months.

Mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her book Tunisian Crochet for Baby on Underground Crafter blog.

Sherbet Stripes Blanket.

UC: If a Tunisian crochet newbie was to pick up this book, what’s the first project you’d recommend to get them hooked, so to speak?

Sharon: Start with the Nursery Box and the simple stitch washcloth from the Washcloth Quartet. I would also suggest the Sherbet Stripes Blanket. It has some color changes, but the pattern itself is simple and straightforward. The matching Sherbet Stripes Hat would be a good follow-up for someone who is ready to go to the next level.

UC: And which project would you recommend for an experienced Tunisian crocheter who wants to try something new?

Sharon: The Christening Gown (with matching bonnet and booties) is a complex project with a Tunisian X-stitch pattern and some intricate shaping. For something that will be worn more often, the Zippered Hoodie will keep experienced crocheters engaged.

Mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her book Tunisian Crochet for Baby on Underground Crafter blog.

Christening Gown, Bonnet, and Booties.

UC: What else would you like us to know about Tunisian Crochet for Baby?

Sharon: All of the yarn I chose is washable. Every pattern includes written instructions and at least one symbol chart. Photo tutorials are included.

Thanks so much for stopping by Sharon! 

If you’d like to learn Tunisian crochet online, try these Craftsy classes: Online Tunisian Crochet Class and Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet (w/ Dora Ohrenstein)!

Giveaway

Stackpole Books is giving a copy of Tunisian Crochet for Baby to one lucky reader with a U.S. mailing address! For your chance to win, check out Stackpole’s lookbook for Tunisian Crochet for Baby, and let me know which project you would make first. Then be sure to log your entry into Rafflecopter! One winner will be chosen at random. Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday, September 16, 2014.

a Rafflecopter giveaway