Category Archives: Needlecrafts

Free pattern: Go West, Young Man Scarf

I’m excited to share a new pattern for an extra long scarf, just as the temperatures are really dropping.

Go West, Young Man Scarf, free crochet pattern for unisex scarf by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

The Go West, Young Man Scarf makes a great gift for a special guy in your life. (It also works for the ladies – it’s super thick and textured!)

This post contains affiliate links.

Go West, Young Man Scarf, free crochet pattern for unisex scarf by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

Alternating post stitches create the look of directional arrows pointing westwards. Holding two strands of yarn together creates a tweedy look while also making this scarf extra warm to protect against a harsh winter.

I even took a #scarfie – Lion Brand‘s hashtag for a scarf-wearing selfie. It’s harder than you would think with a DSLR (sorry, kids, I don’t have a smartphone, so it’s the best way for selfies to happen in my world).

Go West, Young Man Scarf, free #crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter #scarfieI have a carefully positioned shawl pin from Michelle’s Assortment to close the tiny gap that usually forms between the wrap around part of the scarf and the hanging ends.

If you like the pattern, add it to your favorites or your queue on Ravelry! Enjoy!

Go West, Young Man Scarf

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

03-intermediate

US terms 50

4-medium 50

This extra long scarf makes a great gift for a special guy in your life (and it works for the ladies, too!).

Go West, Young Man Scarf, free crochet pattern for unisex scarf by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

Finished Size

  • 6″ (15 cm) wide x 66″ (168 cm) long.

Materials

  • Lion Brand Fishermen’s Wool (100% wool, 8 oz/227 g, 465 yd/425 m) – 2 skeins in Maple Tweed, or approximately 820 yd (750 m) in any medium weight yarn.
  • US L-11/8 mm crochet hook, or any size needed to obtain correct gauge.
  • Yarn needle.
  • Stitch marker.

Gauge

  • 15 sts x 15 rows in pattern = 4” (10 cm). Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Gifts Made by You - Shop Now on Zazzle.com

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern (✪ see Special Stitch Patterns, below)

  • ch – chain
  • FPdtr – front post double treble✪
  • pf – puff stitch ✪
  • pm – place marker
  • rep – repeat
  • rm – remove marker
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sp – space
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • yo – yarn over
  • * Rep instructions after asterisk as indicated.

Special Stitch Patterns

  • FPdtr = front post double treble = Yo 3 times, insert hook from front around post back to front of st 2 rows prior, yo and draw up a loop, (yo and draw through 2 loops) 4 times, sk st behind FPdtr on current row.
  • Pf = puff stitch = *Insert hook in ch-1 sp, yo and draw up a loop;** yo and rep from * to ** once, yo and draw through 4 loops on hook.

Want to improve your crochet skills? Check out the new Craftsy class: See It, Crochet It: Reading Diagrams (with Charles Voth).

Go West, Young Man Scarf, free crochet pattern for unisex scarf by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

Wrap it up with a shawl pin, like this one from Michelle’s Assortment, as a gift!

Pattern Notes

  • Entire scarf is worked holding 2 strands of yarn together.

Pattern Instructions

Scarf

  • Ch 255.
  • Row 1: Turn, sk 1 st, sc in next st and in ea st across. (254 sts)
  • Row 2: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st and next st, pm around last sc, sc in ea st across.
  • Row 3: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st and in ea st across.
  • Row 4: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st and in next 5 sts, FPdtr around marked st, rm, *sc in next 5 sts, sk 5 sts 2 rows below and FPdtr around next st 2 rows below; rep from * across to last st, sc in last st.
  • Row 5: Rep Row 3.
  • Row 6: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st, FPdtr around FPdtr 2 rows below, *sc in next 5 sts, FPdtr around FPdtr 2 rows below; rep from * across to last 6 sts, sc in next 6 sts.
  • Rows 7-9: Rep Row 3, 3 times.
  • Rows 10-14: Rep Rows 2-6.
  • Rows 15-18: Rep Row 3, 4 times.
  • Row 19: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st, *ch 1, sk 1, sc in next st; rep from * across to last st, (ch 1, sc) in last st. (255 sts)
  • Row 20: Turn, ch 1, sc in first sc, *pf in ch-1 sp, ch 1, sk 1; rep from * across to last ch-1 sp, pf in ch-1 sp, sc in last st. Fasten off.

Finishing

  • With yarn needle, weave in ends.

Don’t forget to favorite the Go West, Young Man Scarf on Ravelry!

© 2014 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern, the tutorial, or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2014/10/31/free-pattern-go-west-young-man-scarf/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

New knitting patterns!

I’m really excited to share two new knitting patterns today. Both patterns are 50% off through Tuesday, November 4, 2014 with coupon code pioneers!

This post contains affiliate links.

Both are inspired by pioneer women of aviation, and I had a great time taking pictures up at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodome.

Old Rhinebeck Aerodome on Underground Crafter blog

It’s a great aviation museum just about 90 minutes outside of New York City.

Old Rhinebeck Aerodome on Underground Crafter blogAlthough it rained most of the day and we didn’t get to see the famous air show, I’m still glad we visited. My friend, JS, modeled for both of these patterns.

The first pattern is the Alaskan Moonrise Scarf.

Alaskan Moonrise Scarf, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

The inspiration behind this pattern was pioneering aviatrix, Marvel Crosson, who had a wonderful, flirty sense of style.

Marvel Crosson. Image via San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive on Flickr.

Marvel Crosson. Image via San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive on Flickr.

(You can see more pictures of Marvel here on my Marvel Crosson Pinterest board.) Marvel was the first woman to earn a pilot’s license in Alaska and was posthumously inducted into the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame in 2011.

Alaskan Moonrise Scarf, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

I love this leather jacket, which was loaned to us for the day by a phenomenal local artisan, Carla Dawn Behrle. Carla makes stunning custom-made leather clothing from her studio in New York City, but you can shop in her virtual store from anywhere!

Like many early aviation pioneers, Marvel’s life was cut tragically short. She died in a mysterious crash in Arizona during the first Women’s Air Derby in 1929 when she was 25.

The combination of the semi-circle formed by the stitch pattern and the stunning and icy blue of the Miss Babs hand-dyed yarn (in the Faded colorway) remind me of an Alaskan moonrise, something Marvel might have seen up close during one of her afternoon flights.

Alaskan Moonrise Scarf, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

By the way, with the jumbo Miss Babs Yowza! Whatta Skein!, this is a one-skein project, even though it measures 69” (175 cm) x 6.5” (17 cm) after blocking. (There’s even enough yarn left to make something small, like a pair of fingerless mitts.)

I used two different shawl pins from Michelle’s Assortment in the photos. I love her wire work. You may remember that I had the chance to meet her at Vogue Knitting Live in New York earlier this year.

If you like the pattern, please show the Alaskan Moonrise Scarf some love on Ravelry here!

The next pattern is Thaden’s Ridged Shawlette.

Thaden's Ridged Shawlette, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

This asymmetrical shawlette is inspired by a different pioneering aviatrix, Louise Thaden.

Louise Thaden. Image from the San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive Flickr stream.

Louise Thaden. Image from the San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive Flickr stream.

Thaden also had a wonderful sense of style and frequently wore neckwear. (You can see some great pictures of her on my Louise Thaden Pinterest board here.)

Thaden's Ridged Shawlette, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

This picture includes another shawl pin from Michelle’s Assortment.

Thaden won the first Women’s Air Derby in 1929, and was the first woman to win the Bendix Trophy (in 1936, the first year women could compete against men).

She wrote an amazing biography, High, Wide, and FrightenedI had the opportunity to skim through a first edition copy (held together by lace!) via interlibrary loan.

Thaden book

Thaden’s story is fascinating. Essentially, she was playing hooky from work by hanging around air fields, dreaming of learning to fly. Eventually, Walter Beech noticed her and worked out a sort of trade with her boss. Beech negotiated an entry level job for Thaden – at reduced pay – which included flight lessons. She was also able to use Beech Aircraft Company planes for many of her flights, which helped her defray the costs that became so challenging to other early pilots.

Thaden's Ridged Shawlette, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

This mostly stockinette shawlette features asymmetry in the garter ridged “stripes” and in the asymmetrical picot bind off.

Thaden's Ridged Shawlette, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

The design is perfect for the hand dyed yarn I used, Mountain Colors Twizzle, because the stitch pattern is subtle enough to let the yarn shine. This is also a one-skein project.

If you like the pattern, please show the Thaden’s Ridged Shawlette some love on Ravelry here! And, don’t forget: both patterns are 50% off through Tuesday, November 4, 2014 with coupon code pioneers!

The Flamies Nominations!

FlamiesI’m excited that the Flamies crochet awards are back this year after a two year absence. I’ve seen some great posts by other crochet bloggers sharing their nominations (like this one from Stitch Story and this one on Ambassador Crochet), and I decided to do the same! If you’re going to nominate, do it today! Voting starts in November.

This post contains affiliate links.

Best crochet blog

I read so many crochet blogs that it was tough to narrow it down. I decided to nominate two: Crochet Concupiscence and Fresh Stitches. You can read my interviews with Kathryn Vercillo from Crochet Concupiscence here and here, as well as a post I did for National Crochet Month talking about why I love her blog here. I interviewed Stacey Trock from Fresh Stitches here, reviewed her book, Modern Baby, here, and talked about why I love the tips she shares on her blog here.

Best crochet YouTube channel

I nominated Tamara Kelly from Moogly for her YouTube channel. I previously interviewed Tamara here. Truthfully, I don’t watch many YouTube videos. However, I have seen that over the past few months, Tamara has been posting videos for many of her new patterns, and I watched a few to check out her video technique (hoping for some tips!). Her videos have clear audio and video and seem really integrated into her blog.

Best crochet magazine and digital magazine

I nominated the newcomer, I Like Crochet, in both categories. (If Crochet Today hadn’t shut down, it would probably have gotten my vote for best print magazine.) I Like Crochet is a new digital subscription magazine that includes a range of different designs. I’ve had my patterns and articles published in several issues and so I’ve had a chance to read through those issues and find some fun projects.

Best handcrafted or artisan made crochet hooks

I nominated Diane Soper from Sistermaide on Etsy. I developed a bit of a fascination with bullion stitches a few years ago, and Sistermaide sells these wonderful tapered crochet hooks that make bullions so easy to crochet. You can see the two hooks I ordered from her below.

My two Sistermaide hooks.

My two Sistermaide hooks.

Best commercial crochet hook

Once again, I had to nominate two companies. I think it’s well established that I like Tulip Etimo hooks.

My trusty Tulip Etimo sneaking it's way into a tutorial picture.

My trusty Tulip Etimo sneaking its way into a tutorial picture.

But I recently discovered the Knitter’s Pride Symfonie Dreamz Interchangeable Tunisian Crochet Hook set when one of my free patterns, Tadley’s Diagonal Blanket, was featured on their blog here. These are now my go to hooks for Tunisian and double-ended crochet projects.

Best instructional crochet book

I gave a 5 star review to Kathryn White‘s The Go-To Book for Irish Crochet Motifs. (You can read the full review here on the CGOA blog.) I nominated this book because it finally demystified Irish crochet!

Go-to book of Irish crochet motifs

Best crochet technical editor

I nominated the wonderful Juanita Quinones, also known as BoricuaCrochet on Ravelry. After interviewing her as part of my Hispanic Heritage Month series in 2012, I started working with Juanita for my independently published patterns. She is very thorough, timely, and also provides great feedback and suggestions! (Hopefully, this nomination doesn’t lead to her becoming too busy to tech edit my patterns!)

Best new crochet designer

This was a tough category because it seems that many of the designers I’ve been following have been publishing since before 2012. I nominated Lorene Haythorn Eppolite from Cre8tion Crochet. You can find Lorene’s pattern page on Ravelry here. I love her color sense and the shapes and textures that she creates.

Lifetime achievement award

This was also a tough category, because Lifetime Achievement always implies that someone is about to retire. I decided to nominate Kim Guzman, even though I’m sure she has many more years of designing, teaching, and writing ahead of her. Kim is a very talented designer and she is always willing to share her advice and (virtually) mentor those entering the yarn industry. She is also a great teacher. I learned so much from her Pattern Grading class on Crochetville, and also from reading her many great books. I had the honor of interviewing her here, and you can read my reviews of three of her books here, here, and here.

Temperature Cowl for Mom

In 2013, I had a great time crocheting my temperature scarf, and having a 365 row scarf certainly came in handy during the brutal cold of January and February.

blog Temperature scarf folded flatIf you’re new to the temperature scarf phenomenon, it’s a conceptual project where you link a particular colorway to a set of temperatures, and then allow the weather to dictate your striping pattern. (You can find my free temperature scarf crochet pattern here.)

I promised my mom that I’d make her a temperature scarf before this winter. The catch was she only wanted to include the dates between my sister’s birthday and her birthday. (My birthday happens to be in the middle of theirs.) So, instead I decided to make a cowl.

Last weekend, I picked up some cozy and monochrome yarns from Frog Tree Alpaca that I thought would be perfect at Knitty City during the New York City Yarn Crawl.

FrogTreeAlpaca

Earlier this week, I looked through the weather from December 20, 2013 through February 23, 2014.

TempScarftracking I assigned the colors and charted out the striping pattern.

TempScarfdetailsNow, I just need to pick out a stitch pattern. I’m thinking this may be a knit version, with cables. I know my mom likes cables, but I’m not sure which stitch pattern might look best with frequent color changes. I guess I’ll get swatching!

Giveaway: 2015 Crochet Calendar

For the past few years, I’ve been submitting some of my patterns to the crochet and knitting pattern-a-day calendar series.

Giveaway for the 2015 Crochet Pattern-a-Day pattern on Underground Crafter blog

This post contains affiliate links.

Three of my crochet patterns are in the 2015 Crochet Day-to-Day Calendar:

Pineapples for Everyone Shawl (link to free pattern/link to Ravelry page)

Pineapples for Everyone Shawl, , free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

Rectangular Sampler Blanket (link to free pattern/link to Ravelry page)

Rectangular Sampler Blanket, free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

Quick, Fast in a Hurry Cowl (link to free pattern/link to Ravelry page)

Quickie fast in a hurry cowl, , free crochet pattern by Underground CrafterThis box calendar also includes over 100 other crochet patterns. I’m giving away a copy of the calendar. This giveaway is open to anyone with a U.S. mailing address. Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Sunday, October 26, 2014. One winner will be chosen at random.

I’ll be running the giveaway through Rafflecopter, so make sure you add your entry into the form!

Let me know in the comments: What do you plan to crochet in 2015? Do you have any specific projects you plan to make, skills you want to learn, or charities you want to crochet for?

a Rafflecopter giveaway