Category Archives: New York

New knitting patterns!

I’m really excited to share two new knitting patterns today. Both patterns are 50% off through Tuesday, November 4, 2014 with coupon code pioneers!

This post contains affiliate links.

Both are inspired by pioneer women of aviation, and I had a great time taking pictures up at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodome.

Old Rhinebeck Aerodome on Underground Crafter blog

It’s a great aviation museum just about 90 minutes outside of New York City.

Old Rhinebeck Aerodome on Underground Crafter blogAlthough it rained most of the day and we didn’t get to see the famous air show, I’m still glad we visited. My friend, JS, modeled for both of these patterns.

The first pattern is the Alaskan Moonrise Scarf.

Alaskan Moonrise Scarf, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

The inspiration behind this pattern was pioneering aviatrix, Marvel Crosson, who had a wonderful, flirty sense of style.

Marvel Crosson. Image via San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive on Flickr.

Marvel Crosson. Image via San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive on Flickr.

(You can see more pictures of Marvel here on my Marvel Crosson Pinterest board.) Marvel was the first woman to earn a pilot’s license in Alaska and was posthumously inducted into the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame in 2011.

Alaskan Moonrise Scarf, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

I love this leather jacket, which was loaned to us for the day by a phenomenal local artisan, Carla Dawn Behrle. Carla makes stunning custom-made leather clothing from her studio in New York City, but you can shop in her virtual store from anywhere!

Like many early aviation pioneers, Marvel’s life was cut tragically short. She died in a mysterious crash in Arizona during the first Women’s Air Derby in 1929 when she was 25.

The combination of the semi-circle formed by the stitch pattern and the stunning and icy blue of the Miss Babs hand-dyed yarn (in the Faded colorway) remind me of an Alaskan moonrise, something Marvel might have seen up close during one of her afternoon flights.

Alaskan Moonrise Scarf, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

By the way, with the jumbo Miss Babs Yowza! Whatta Skein!, this is a one-skein project, even though it measures 69” (175 cm) x 6.5” (17 cm) after blocking. (There’s even enough yarn left to make something small, like a pair of fingerless mitts.)

I used two different shawl pins from Michelle’s Assortment in the photos. I love her wire work. You may remember that I had the chance to meet her at Vogue Knitting Live in New York earlier this year.

If you like the pattern, please show the Alaskan Moonrise Scarf some love on Ravelry here!

The next pattern is Thaden’s Ridged Shawlette.

Thaden's Ridged Shawlette, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

This asymmetrical shawlette is inspired by a different pioneering aviatrix, Louise Thaden.

Louise Thaden. Image from the San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive Flickr stream.

Louise Thaden. Image from the San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive Flickr stream.

Thaden also had a wonderful sense of style and frequently wore neckwear. (You can see some great pictures of her on my Louise Thaden Pinterest board here.)

Thaden's Ridged Shawlette, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

This picture includes another shawl pin from Michelle’s Assortment.

Thaden won the first Women’s Air Derby in 1929, and was the first woman to win the Bendix Trophy (in 1936, the first year women could compete against men).

She wrote an amazing biography, High, Wide, and FrightenedI had the opportunity to skim through a first edition copy (held together by lace!) via interlibrary loan.

Thaden book

Thaden’s story is fascinating. Essentially, she was playing hooky from work by hanging around air fields, dreaming of learning to fly. Eventually, Walter Beech noticed her and worked out a sort of trade with her boss. Beech negotiated an entry level job for Thaden – at reduced pay – which included flight lessons. She was also able to use Beech Aircraft Company planes for many of her flights, which helped her defray the costs that became so challenging to other early pilots.

Thaden's Ridged Shawlette, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

This mostly stockinette shawlette features asymmetry in the garter ridged “stripes” and in the asymmetrical picot bind off.

Thaden's Ridged Shawlette, knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

The design is perfect for the hand dyed yarn I used, Mountain Colors Twizzle, because the stitch pattern is subtle enough to let the yarn shine. This is also a one-skein project.

If you like the pattern, please show the Thaden’s Ridged Shawlette some love on Ravelry here! And, don’t forget: both patterns are 50% off through Tuesday, November 4, 2014 with coupon code pioneers!

Temperature Cowl for Mom

In 2013, I had a great time crocheting my temperature scarf, and having a 365 row scarf certainly came in handy during the brutal cold of January and February.

blog Temperature scarf folded flatIf you’re new to the temperature scarf phenomenon, it’s a conceptual project where you link a particular colorway to a set of temperatures, and then allow the weather to dictate your striping pattern. (You can find my free temperature scarf crochet pattern here.)

I promised my mom that I’d make her a temperature scarf before this winter. The catch was she only wanted to include the dates between my sister’s birthday and her birthday. (My birthday happens to be in the middle of theirs.) So, instead I decided to make a cowl.

Last weekend, I picked up some cozy and monochrome yarns from Frog Tree Alpaca that I thought would be perfect at Knitty City during the New York City Yarn Crawl.

FrogTreeAlpaca

Earlier this week, I looked through the weather from December 20, 2013 through February 23, 2014.

TempScarftracking I assigned the colors and charted out the striping pattern.

TempScarfdetailsNow, I just need to pick out a stitch pattern. I’m thinking this may be a knit version, with cables. I know my mom likes cables, but I’m not sure which stitch pattern might look best with frequent color changes. I guess I’ll get swatching!

Interview with Pam Hoffman from Indian Lake Artisans

I’m really excited to share an interview today with Pam Hoffman from Indian Lake Artisans. I had the pleasure of meeting Pam at Vogue Knitting Live in 2013, and then again in 2014. Pam and her husband, Mark, make these amazing hexagonal knitting needles (and other knitting and crochet accessories) using locally sourced materials. If you are at the New York Sheep and Wool Festival this weekend (also known as “Rhinebeck”), please check out their booth!

Pam and Mark also generously sponsored my 2014 Sampler Mystery Knit-a-Long by providing a set of hexagonal knitting needles to the winner of our August giveaway. (If you want to join in on the MKAL, you can buy the pattern here on Ravelry and chat in the Underground Crafter group here. There are more fun prizes to come in October, November, and December!)

You can find Indian Lake Artisans online on their website, Facebook page, and Twitter. Product photos are copyright Indian Lake Artisans and used with permission.

This post contains affiliate links.

Interview with Pam from Indian Lake Artisans on Underground Crafter blog

Pam at Vogue Knitting Live in 2013. I loved the booth as soon as I saw it!

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you start Indian Lake Artisans?

Pam: We live in a little log cabin, on a little island, on a little lake, in southeastern Michigan, north of Detroit named Indian Lake. Mark and I have always loved the outdoors and find much inspiration in our life from nature. We love arts and crafts so when we began making knitting needles we wanted a name that would grow with the company and encompass multiple art forms and artisans, thus Indian Lake Artisans was born. We launched the company in May 2010 with 9 products and we now make over 200 items. We make single point, double point and circular knitting needles. We have shawl pins, cable needles, stitch markers and our very own unique hexagonal wooden yarn bowls.

Interview with Pam from Indian Lake Artisans on Underground Crafter blog

Straight hexagonal knitting needles by Indian Lake Artisans.

UC: What inspired you to create your signature line of hexagonal knitting needles?

Pam: I was shopping for a Christmas present at my local yarn shop and I wanted to buy some knitting needles, yarn and a book for my daughter who was in her mid twenties and a beginning knitter.

The expert knitter at the shop thought square needles would be a good idea for her. She took a set down and began casting on to show me how easy it is to knit with the square needles. She was all thumbs and really struggling, and she was the expert. It sure didn’t look easy to me!

I declined on the square needles and bought a traditional pair instead but I couldn’t stop thinking about different shapes that might be beneficial for knitters. Back in my Jeep and driving to pick up my son, I came to a stop sign. Octagonal? No, too many flat sides. I had a Dixon Ticonderoga pencil on my dash board and that triggered my brain. Hexagonal! Easy to hold, round in nature. Returned home, grabbed my pencils and yarn, and began knitting. This felt really great.

The hexagonal shape is easy to hold. You do not have to grip the needles tightly to control them. The hexagonal shape is round in nature and creates beautiful stitches with uniform tension, and your stitch gauge stays true to size. If you think about the hexagonal shape, the yarn stretches from point to point around the hexagon. The flat side is slightly under the yarn and this creates a tiny gap or ease in the yarn. This makes it very easy for you to slide your knitting needle under your stitch, making it very easy to knit and purl. You never have to force anything.

The minute you have to force your knitting needles, you need to grip them tighter and that action tenses everything…hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, back and brain. When you are holding our needles in one hand, they rest comfortably flat side to flat side. You don’t have to try to control two round objects that want to spin against each other. The hexagonal shape makes knitting multiple stitches together, or knitting into the front and back of a stitch, so much easier because you have just a little extra wiggle room to work your stitches. The needles are recyclable and non toxic. Allergy sufferers really love our needles as they are nickel free. We hear from our customers all of the time how our needles have changed their lives. They are able to knit again and their hands no longer ache. Our needles are very ergonomic.

Indian Lake Artisans single point knitting needles are available in US size 6 through size 15. Each single point size has a decorative copper topper unique to that particular size. I designed all of the tops and they are made with a very lightweight and recyclable plastic that is copper plated. The toppers from small to large are as follows; feather, owl, fish, rowboat, arrowhead, lantern, acorn, turtle, and cabin.

The double points are available in size 2 through size 15. The DPN’s are wonderful as they provide control for your hands and your stitches. No need to worry about your stitches dancing off the needles while resting on the table.

The circular needles are available in size 3 through 15. We make standard lengths 16″, 24″, 32″ and 40″. We are also able to make custom lengths. We have made 12″ and 60″ length circulars for customers and everything in between. We love customizing needles for a particular project need. The circular needles swivel on the connector and this relieves twisting of the cord as the needles move with you.

Hexagonal knitting needles make happy knitting!

Interview with Pam from Indian Lake Artisans on Underground Crafter blog

Hexagonal circular knitting needles by Indian Lake Artisans.

UC: Tell us more about your commitment to using locally sourced materials.

Pam: On receiving the first patent, we had to figure out how to make the needles. What an adventure it has been! Michigan had not rebounded from the recession of the early 2000s and was devastated by the financial crash of 2008. I wanted to utilize every Michigan company I could to produce the needles. If we couldn’t find a Michigan source, it would have to be a USA company. I was determined to avoid overseas, outsourced, cheap labor and components.

We are extremely proud to say that we have succeeded in our “Michigan made” mission. We use more than ten Michigan companies that help employ roughly 500 people to produce our needles. The individual decorative tops for the single points are made in Grandville, MI along with the tooling for these tops. They are copper plated in Warren, MI. The wood we use is from sustainable forests in the Great Lakes and a mill in Highland prepares the native wood, walnut, cherry, and maple, for Mark. The two custom made machines Mark uses to cut the needles were made in Ann Arbor and Lapeer. The cutting blades for the machines are made in Flint. The US stainless steel connector parts for the circular needles are made in Saint Clair. The packaging is made in Rochester and is die cut in Dexter. The brands to mark the needle sizes and our logo for the beautiful yarn bowls were made in Madison Heights. The 100% natural beeswax we use to finish the needles comes from Benzonia. We use local patent attorneys, lawyers and accountants.

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And there is us, me and Mark, our labor force of two. Yes, indeed, the needles are handcrafted by us, every single one, hand cut, hand sanded, and hand polished. The needles are beautiful! We both try very, very hard to make the best quality knitting needle available in the marketplace today and we think we have succeeded in this mission. There is nothing more satisfying than knowing you are knitting with a locally sourced, locally handcrafted product, helping to provide economic support to your local community.

Interview with Pam from Indian Lake Artisans on Underground Crafter blog

Shawl pins by Indian Lake Artisans.

UC: You travel to a lot of fiber festivals to showcase the Indian Lake Artisans products. (In fact, I met you at Vogue Knitting Live in 2013.) What are some of your favorite memories from the fiber festivals you’ve visited?

Pam: We have been participating at fiber festivals for roughly two years and we absolutely love it. Mark and I love adventure and travel and we enjoy meeting people everywhere we go. Having a booth at a fiber show allows us to meet our fellow fiber enthusiasts and tell them all about our wonderful knitting needles. We always have a few different sets with some yarn for knitters to test drive the knitting needles and experience the hexagonal shape. We just have the best time and it is always fun to see a beautifully finished project the following year from a satisfied customer.

We have exhibited at  the Vogue Knitting LIVE events, STITCHES, and many local fiber festivals. We have a lot of fun at the New York Sheep and Wool Festival in Rhinebeck, NY and will be there again this October. We are busy right now preparing for the Michigan Fiber Festival held in Allegan, MI (UC comment: This event was held on August 15 – 17, 2014). We hope to exhibit at more festivals in the future and see more of our great country. We really like driving to our shows to help keep the travel costs down. Plus driving allows us to take more products along too. We met Marie at VKLive in New York last year.

Interview with Pam from Indian Lake Artisans on Underground Crafter blog

Hexagonal yarn bowls by Indian Lake Artisans.

UC: If people aren’t able to meet you at a local fiber festival, where else can they buy your needles?

Pam: We of course sell the needles and accessories at the fiber festivals we attend. Our complete product line is available on our Indian Lake Artisans website marketplace. We are lucky to have about 75 retailers across the country that carry our needles and that list of retailers is on our website. We are constantly surprised by the number of people who have never heard about our fantastic knitting needles and we are always looking for opportunities to reach more people. So please spread the word to your favorite local shop owners and friends.

Interview with Pam from Indian Lake Artisans on Underground Crafter blog

Stitch markers by Indian Lake Artisans.

UC: Do you and Mark knit?

Pam: I learned to knit as a teenager and  almost finished a sweater but really took up knitting with interest in 2003. Mark just learned to knit last year and was only using size 10 needles to make his first scarves and hats that sent him on his knitting adventure. He challenged himself recently though, and picked up some size 6 double points to knit a pair of fingerless gloves with flaps. The fingerless gloves are a very complicated pattern for a new knitter and pose additional challenges with a first attempt using double points. You can see photos of Mark’s gloves in progress on the Indian Lake Artisans Facebook page. I think you will agree that Mark is doing a great job!! I firmly believe the hexagonal shape facilitates learning to knit and purl, and control of the knitting needles. Mark’s very first scarf was even and straight. For a first project I attribute his success to our hexagonal needles as his stitches were well formed and very nice. Successful beginnings lead to a life long hobby.

UC: What’s next for Indian Lake Artisans?

Pam: We are in the process of developing interchangeable circular needles and designer needle cases. We plan to launch a Kickstarter campaign to raise funding for the project. This is a very exciting undertaking for Mark and me. We will be sure to announce the Kickstarter on Facebook and Twitter so friends can help us reach our goal.

Thank you so much for stopping by, Pam! We look forward to seeing those interchangeables on the market, so let us know when the Kickstarter launches! 

Interview with Letty Giron (Hispanic Heritage Month series)

HHM Letty Giron

I’m continuing my Hispanic Heritage Month series today with an interview with fellow New Yorker and Etsy seller, Letty Giron. Letty is a Guatemalan-American crocheter and maker sells her creations as Simply Baby by Letty. Letty can also be found on Instagram as SimplyBabyByLetty.

 

All images are copyright Letty Giron and are used with permission. Click on the image to be brought to the listing in Letty’s Etsy shop.

This post contains affiliate links.

Letty Giron.

Letty Giron.

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you first learn to crochet?

Letty: As a young girl, I always saw my mother with a crochet hook in hand doing little dresses and sweaters for babies in pastel colors and I remember thinking that they looked like cotton candy, because she used to hang them in a line.  They were beautiful and she made them all herself after going to craft classes.

Then, as a teenager, my older sister taught me the basic stitches. As my mother had so many magazines, all of them about doilies and tablecloths, I started to read them and learned more about stitches, and I started to follow the instructions. So in the beginning I only learned how to make doilies. Not major items. But that’s how I began and slowly it grew from there.

A dress combining a sewn cotton skirt with a crocheted, mercerized cotton top. (Size 6-12 months.)

A dress combining a sewn cotton skirt with a crocheted, mercerized cotton top. (Size 6-12 months.)

UC: What inspired you to open an Etsy shop?

Letty: I’ve always made baby clothes for friends and family who are expecting and sometimes they would ask me to make something for their friends.  Also, I’ve been working with children for four years and it helped me learn the different sizes of babies as they grow.  Someone suggested that I open an Etsy shop and just see if these little things I make might be of interest to other people.  Although I’ve only just started, I’ve already had some success and I imagine more is to come.

A unisex, crocheted sweater and hat set, featuring moon and star buttons. (Size 3-9 months)

A unisex, crocheted sweater and hat set, featuring moon and star buttons. (Size 3-9 months.)

UC: Your shop focuses on crochet for baby. What do you enjoy about baby projects?

Letty: I really do enjoy all kind of projects for babies, but I’m more focused on sweaters, hats, and dresses that I combine with fabric, because I love prints – specifically floral, animals, and galaxy print – but really all kinds in general.

UC: What was the yarn craft scene like in your community when you where growing up?

Letty: I grew up in a small town outside of the city in Guatemala, and as a child I can remember my maternal grandma baking all kind of bread and cakes and different kind of food. She really enjoyed her kitchen.

Since she used a lot of eggs for her baking, I remember when she broke the eggs she did it very carefully, breaking them only on one side because she used to decorate the shells with so many different colors and fill them up with confetti. Then all the kids in our neighborhood used them for a celebration that we call Carnaval and also for Easter time which in Spanish we call Semana Santa. It was a great activity for the children to be involved in the creative process of decorating them.

We didn’t have so much yarn around in my family before my mother began her crochet classes, though my maternal grandma often sewed shirts for all the boys in the family.

A crocheted brown and pink set including a hat, booties, and a cardigan. (Size 3-9 months.)

A crocheted brown and pink set including a hat, booties, and a cardigan. (Size 3-9 months.)

UC: How does that compare with the current scene in your neighborhood in New York?

Letty: When I came to New York at age 21, I knew very little English. I was interested in continuing my crochet skills but could not find any magazines in Spanish so I started to buy in English and with a dictionary in hand I could read and translate all the abbreviation into Spanish and that is how I managed to continue doing it. Similarly, in the beginning I did not know where to find yarn. Now it is possible and easy to find stores with many magazines, yarn brands, fibers, and some of them even offer courses for sewing, crochet, and knitting.

Additionally, the internet makes the whole community much wider and easier to find.  Today the scope and reach of crafters is truly global – I have followers on Instagram from all over and we share our projects and tips. 

A crocheted hat and sweater set. (Size 3-9 months.)

A crocheted hat and sweater set. (Size 3-9 months.)

UC: Does your cultural background influence your crafting? If so how?

Letty: Yes, as when I was young I had an aunt who had a sewing machine, a very old machine.  I used to sit on her chair and pretend to sew. But mostly I think I was influence by my maternal grandma, she really had very good hands – baking all kinds of goods, sewing by hand, and also embroidering. And of course, by my mom and my sister.  As crafting and working with one’s hands was such a large part of my heritage, I have continued that relationship with physical objects.  We didn’t buy new things and continuously throw them away – we made our treasured items, put our time and effort into them, so they were special and unique.  It meant that we took care of them as they have a history.  Family is so important to me and my community so we also pass on objects that were important to one family member – we cherish these things as reminders of them – so we like to make things that will last.


As time passed by I have learn to crochet so many things, like scarf, hats, for adult and young ones.  Then I started to crochet blankets, sweater, hats, booties, to give as a gift. By now I can crochet all kind of items and I don’t have to follow a magazine but design it myself.
Knitting I know very little, but what I most love and enjoy is doing crochet and work with fabric. All handmade, special items.

Crochet receiving blanket.

Crochet receiving blanket.

UC: What are your favorite crochet books and magazines in your collection?

Letty:

Crocheted striped sweater set. (Size: 3 to 9 months.)

Crocheted striped sweater set. (Size: 3 to 9 months.)

UC: Are there any Spanish or English language crafty website/blogs you visit regularly for inspiration or community?

Letty: I mostly like to check Pinterest and Instagram for inspiration, and I also like to watch the cooking channels, particularly the baking shows – the colors and the softness of the confectionary items seem so much like a pile of soft yarn.

Dover Books

UC: What are you working on now?

Letty: I’m currently working on adding new items to my Etsy shop and experimenting with different shapes – I’ve done a lot of narrow sleeves for the baby sweaters but I’d like to try some variations.  I’m also adding new receiving blankets as these are great baby shower gifts.  All of my items are customizable, so someone could add a special fabric, color or print to the back of any of the blankets.

Thank you for sharing your time, Letty! Good luck with your Etsy shop!

Free Pattern: ’80s Remix Chain

'80s Remix Chain, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

I’ve seen my fair share of fat gold chains. After all, I grew up in New York City during the birth of the hip hop scene. In 2013, I was asked to make some samples for the Kollabora booth at Vogue Knitting Live, and this is one of them.

My friend, Carlota Zimmerman, also remembers those days. We shared a few laughs and memories during this summer time photo shoot. However, this eye catching necklace could be worn in any season.

I’m sharing this as a blog freebie. If you enjoy this pattern, show it some love on Ravelry here.

This post contains affiliate links.

'80s Remix Chain, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

’80s Remix Chain Crochet Pattern

By Underground Crafter

02-easy 50 US terms 50 3-light 50This necklace has enough bling to remind me of growing up during the early days of the hip hop scene.

Finished Size

  • Adjustable. Sample is 24” (61 cm) circumference.

Materials

  • Galler Yarns Kismet (87% polyester/13% nylon, 8 oz/227 g/1,400 yds/1,280 m) – 1 cone each in 902 Light Gold (CA) and 907 Fuchsia (CB), or approximately 170-210 yds (155.5-192 m) in each of 2 colors in any metallic, light weight yarn.
  • E-4/3.5 mm crochet hook, or any size needed to obtain correct gauge
  • Yarn needle.
  • Stitch marker (optional).

Gauge

    • Link Tube 1 in pattern = 4” (10 cm) long before joining. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Hooded Scarves to Crochet

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • CA – color A
  • CB – color B
  • ch – chain
  • ea – each
  • rep – repeat
  • Rnd(s) – Round(s)
  • sc – single crochet
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • * Rep instructions following asterisk as indicated.

Pattern Notes

  • Tubes are crocheted in the round. Do not join rnds unless indicated.

Pattern Instructions

Link Tube 1 (Make 9 in CA and 8 in CB)

    • Ch 9.
    • Set Up Row: Turn, sk first ch, sc in next ch and in ea ch across. Optional: Place marker in last st to indicate end of rnd, move marker up each rnd. (8 sts)
    • Rnd 1: Being careful not to twist, join with sc in next st and begin crocheting in spirals, sc in ea st around.
    • Rnd 2: Sc in ea st around.
    • Rep Rnd 2 until tube measures approximately 4” (10 cm) long, fasten off with long yarn tail of approximately 8” (20 cm) long. 

Dover Books

Link Tube 2 (Make 1 in CB)

  • Ch 9.
  • Set Up Row: Turn, sk first ch, sc in next ch and in ea ch across. Optional: Place marker in last st to indicate end of rnd, move marker up each rnd. (8 sts)
  • Rnd 1: Being careful not to twist, join with sc in next st and begin crocheting in spirals, sc in ea st around.
  • Rnd 2: Sc in ea st around.
  • Rep Rnd 2 until tube measures approximately 12” (30.5 cm) long, fasten off with long yarn tail of approximately 8” (20 cm) long.

'80s Remix Chain, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

Assembly

  • Starting with Link Tube 1 in CA, fold link in half with short ends together. Line up sts across sides (4 sts on ea side). Close edge of tube by working sl st through 4 layers of corresponding sts on each side across (4 sl sts). With yarn needle, weave in ends.
  • Attach remaining Link Tube 1 pieces by alternating colors and folding through previously joined link, using the pictures of the finished necklace as a guide.
  • Join Link Tube 2 by folding through links on ea end of necklace to close.

If you like this pattern, show it some love on Ravelry here.

© 2014 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use it to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2014/09/26/free-pattern-80s-remix-chain/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!