Tag Archives: alpaca

Free pattern: Alpaca Caress Infinity Scarf

Alpaca Caress Infinity Scarf, free crochet pattern by Underground CrafterI love the feel of alpaca yarn. It’s so soft and silky. It’s just perfect for wearing around the neck, especially if you have sensitive skin.

This post contains affiliate links. Yarn for this sample was generously provided by Galler Yarns. I also loved marled yarns where two different colors of fiber are twisted together to create a tweedy look. Galler Yarns Peruvian Tweed brings together soft alpaca, a marled yarn, and a jumbo skein (8 ounces/227 grams!), and you can make two of these infinity scarves out of one skein – one for you, and one for a gift. Alpaca Caress Infinity Scarf, free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter Don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or with my Facebook page if you make one! Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy


Alpaca Caress Infinity Scarf

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

03-intermediateUS terms 504-medium 50This lacy and textured infinity scarf is perfect for transitional weather. The soft alpaca yarn will caress your neck and can be wrapped around up to three times.

Finished Size

  • Adult: 60” (152 cm) long x 4” (10 cm) wide after blocking.


  • Galler Yarns Peruvian Tweed (100% superfine alpaca, 8 oz/227 g/600 yds/550 m) – 1 skein in 121 Pewter Black, or approximately 295 yds (270 m) in any medium weight alpaca yarn.
  • US Size H-8 (5 mm) crochet hook or any size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn needle.
  • Stitch marker or scrap yarn (optional).


  • 13 sts x 10 rows = 4” (10 cm) in pattern. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

CraftsyAbbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • ch – chain
  • cdc – crossed double crochet – Skip st, dc in next st, dc in skipped st.
  • dc – double crochet
  • FPsc – front post single crochet – Insert hook from front around back to front of pf in previous round, yo and draw up a loop, yo and draw through 2 loops, sk st behind FPsc.
  • hdc – half double crochet
  • pf – puff stitch – (Yo, insert hook in sts, yo and draw up a loop) 4 times, yo and draw through all 9 loops.
  • rep – repeat
  • Rnd(s) – Round(s)
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • * Repeat instructions after asterisks as indicated.

Pattern Instructions

  • Ch 252 (or any multiple of 10 sts, + 2 sts). For tips on how to work with a long foundation chain, read Easy fixes for a foundation chain with too few or too many chains.
  • Set up row: Turn, sk 1 ch, sc in next st and in ea st across. Being careful not to twist, join with sl st to first sc to begin working in the round. (251 sts) Optional: mark last stitch of Round with stitch marker. Move stitch marker up each Round.
  • Rnd 1: Ch 3 (counts as dc, here and throughout), cdc around, join with sl st to top of first ch 3.
  • Rnd 2: Rep Rnd 1.
  • Rnd 3: Ch 1, sc in same st and in each around.
  • Rnd 4: Ch 3, *dc in next st, ch 1, sk 1; rep from * around, join with sl st to top of first ch 3.
  • Rnd 5: Ch 2 (counts as hdc, here and throughout), *pf in next st, hdc in ch-1 sp; rep from * around, join with sl st to top of first ch 2.
  • Rnd 6: Ch 1, sc in same st, *FPsc around next pf, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * around.
  • Rnd 7: Rep Rnd 4.
  • Rnd 8: Ch 1, starting in same st *sc in next st, sc in next ch-1 sp; rep from * around.
  • Rnds 9-11: Rep Rnds 1-3. Fasten off.


  • With yarn needle, weave in yarn tails. Gently spray block if desired.
© 2015 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2015/11/11/free-pattern-alpaca-caress-infinity-scarf. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or with my Facebook page if you make one! Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy

Vogue Knitting Live, Day 1

Yesterday, Vogue Knitting Live 2013 opened in New York.  If you’re in the New York area this weekend, you should stop by!  Here’s a quick wrap up of some of what I’ve seen so far.


The gallery exhibits were being set up in the morning, and I had a chance to photograph most of them before it got too crowded.  Here are some of the highlights.  (And speaking of highlights, keep in mind that these photos were taken in dimly lit hotel corridors.)

Colorful Stitches had an awesome array of knit food displayed like a picnic table.  This bowl of cereal with a strawberry was my favorite!

Alyssa Ettinger is a ceramic artist with a studio in my native Brooklyn.  I love the soothing pastels of her work.

Rhonda Fargnoli‘s continuing education students at the Rhode Island School of Design created some beautiful designs with mill ends from Koigu.

I got to meet Anna Hrachovec of Mochimochi Land fame.  I’ve been an admirer of Anna’s work since I first saw it at the Lion Brand Yarn Studio in 2011.  We’ll both be at the 9th Annual Pittsburgh Knit and Crochet Festival in March.  (I’m teaching and she’s exhibiting.)

Adrian Kershaw is a crocheter and knitter working with upcycled VHS tapes as yarn.  Because her work is black and the lighting was so dim, the pictures don’t really convey the projects.  They’re pretty cool!

Carol MacDonald is a printmaker who makes prints, cards, and tags using her images from her knitting.

Edwina Sutherland is a fiber artist working primarily with needlefelting.  She shared her secret for successfully transporting her projects for display with me – wrap them in quilt batting.

And last – but certainly not least – was the crochet artist, Jo Hamilton.  I’ve seen her crochet portraits online and was really looking forward to seeing them in real life.  They are much cooler in person because there is much more texture and subtle color variations than a photo can convey.

Interview Teaser

I met with Danielle Chalson from Makewise Designs for a quick interview after lunch.   Until I publish it, I’ll just share this picture of Danielle’s enthusiastic smile.

Send your happy thoughts her way. She'll be working at the String booth at the Marketplace tomorrow!

The Marketplace

Apparently I wasn't the only one trying to get into the Marketplace when it opened.

With over 70 vendors, the Vogue Knitting Marketplace alone could take up many blog posts.  So I’ll just concentrate on the colleagues I visited and my purchases.

Kollabora's booth during set up.

I stopped by Kollabora‘s booth a few times to say hi and to see my samples on display.  Here’s a sneak peak of two of my upcoming crochet designs that they are debuting at Vogue Knitting Live.  (The patterns aren’t available yet.)

It was also cool to see two of my other designs featured in their ad in the program.

The patterns for the Givin’ Me Fever Pom Pom Hat (knit) and the Chevron Shell Cowl (crochet) are available as free downloads.

I also took a picture of their schedule so I can remember to stop by their events. With a program this packed, every reminder helps!

Then I got the chance to meet Shannon Okey (a.k.a. Knitgrrl) in person.  I have a pattern in one of the upcoming Cooperative Press Fresh Designs: Crochet books so we chatted about that briefly.  I somehow forgot to take a picture of Shannon, but here is a picture of the Cooperative Press booth :).I had a chance to check out Dishcloth Diva by Deb Buckingham in person.  It looked just as scrumptious as I thought it would!  (And I love that I can feel glamorous about making dishcloths!)

You may remember from Vogue Knitting Live last year that my first purchase was at the Kinokuniya booth.  Well, ever since I bought this awesome Japanese knitting stitch guide from Knitty City in the fall, I’ve realized that I don’t know nearly as much about knitting stitch symbols as I do about crochet stitch symbols, and I’ve been thinking about buying Clear & Simple Knitting Symbols.

A taste of the crochet selection at the Kinokuniya booth.

And then I saw the North Light Fibers booth.  I was drawn in because their tagline is “Block Island made,” and MC used to vacation in Block Island as a kid.  In addition to great natural fiber yarns, they sell these cozy alpaca socks.

After that, I saw a local vendor, the Long Island Livestock Company.

This chair from the Long Island Livestock Company booth is made from three spinning wheels from the 1930s.

I had a great chat with the owner and her husband, and I was drawn to their natural care products.

So what did I end up buying?

I bought a pair of cozy alpaca socks for MC, a book for me, and some handmade soap and lip butter from a local company.

You’re probably saying, “What?? No yarn??”  You know I’ve been working on stashbusting for the past 13 months.  I’m not sure if I’ll buy yarn at Vogue Knitting Live, but I promised myself that I wouldn’t on the first day.  I wanted the chance to look at everything and sleep on any potential yarn purchases…  Let’s see how I hold up today!

Interview with Karia from Kouture Crochet

Recently, I had the pleasure of meeting Karia (also known as KoutureCrochet on Ravelry).  As a Brooklyn native, I’m always excited to meet crocheters in my home borough online – somehow, it often seems easier than meeting them in real life!  Karia is organizing an interesting Kickstarter project and also co-owns an Etsy shop.  You can also find Kouture Crochet online on Facebook.

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you first get started crocheting and knitting?
Kouture Crochet (KC): I started crocheting as a teen. My sister was in high school taking an art class where she was learning to crochet. As any self respecting younger sister, I wanted to do what my big sister was doing.  So with the help of my mother, my sister taught me how to crochet. I crocheted all through high school, college and beyond. I learned to knit years later after graduating college. These two art forms quickly become a big part of who I am and how i relax, how I watch tv and why I love audio books.

A unisex black alpaca scarf by Kouture Crochet. (Click photo to link to Etsy shop.)

UC: What inspired you to start selling your creations on Etsy?
KC: I started selling on Etsy because I was going broke making scarves and gifts for friends and family! Selling on Etsy was a way to continue to craft without losing money. I quickly realized I wanted to make this into a career. I’ve been selling on Etsy since March 2011, and I hope to be selling my crafts for a long time to come.

Knit skinny tie made with handdyed yarn by Kouture Crochet.

UC: Tell us about your Handspun Single Sheep Breeds Yarn Kickstarter project and your inspiration for developing it.

KC: For my shop on Etsy and for my personal projects, I used only natural fibers. One thing I found is that the selection of high quality 100% natural yarns is limited and often extremely expensive. I was able to find easy accessible camel and alpaca yarns through some luck and research. Wool yarns was more difficult. It felt like I had one option: merino. I love working with merino but I wanted to try something different.

When I started trying to find wool from other sheep breeds I was completely overwhelmed. There are hundreds of breeds and countless varieties. Purchasing finished yarns from more than one or two breeds was just not in my budget. In the end, I taught myself to spin yarn on a drop spindle in order to be able to try different breeds and varieties. I was lucky enough to be able to make my own yarns and learn to spin on a drop spindle, but most people don’t have the time or patience to learn to make their own yarns. There is a such a need for single breed yarns and it seemed to me like the market was not filling that need.

The best way to know “what is what” is to feel the yarn and work with it. However, there are hundreds of breeds and thousands of varieties. One skein of single breed yarn can be anywhere from $15 – $70. I had been a backer of many Kickstarter projects, and Kickstarter was a perfect format for this kind of idea. The project took months to research and price even though the goal was simple: affordable, an easy to understand way to try different single breed yarns. I have narrowed down the list to just 26 breeds. They vary wildly in softness, crimp, coarseness, strength and even the natural colors the fibers come in. I don’t cut corners in quality, but by offering samples of one ounce mini skeins its possible to offer many breeds for an affordable price.

Few, if any, local yarn shops will have more than 5 breeds of yarn to try, let alone 26! As a lover of natural fibers, it is great to be able to feel and sample a yarn in your hand. My hope is there are just a few people like me who wanted to try these fibers and yarns. Crafters who love natural yarns will be able to do so at a very reasonable price. I also hope that people who think wool is that “itchy, expensive stuff” will also give it a try.  (UC comment: This is really a great project!  If you’d like to contribute, check out Kouture Crochet’s Kickstarter page here.)

Handdyed merino yarn by Kouture Crochet.

UC: Do you have any crafty websites or blogs you frequent for inspiration or community that you would like to share?

KC: I’m new to Ravelry, but I love having such a large and active community of crafters.


Thanks so much for stopping by for an interview, Karia!