Tag Archives: crochet hook

Craftwich Creations: Interview, Crochet Hook Review, and Giveaway!

Interview with Monica Lowe from Craftwich Creations with crochet hook review and giveaway on Underground Crafter

Today is the last in a series of weekly (Inter)National Crochet Month posts where I feature an artisanal crochet hook maker, share a review of the hooks, and offer up a giveaway where you can win your very own hand crafted crochet hook necklace!

Craftwich likes to add a touch of mystery to the packaging.

Craftwich likes to add a touch of mystery to the packaging.

This post contains affiliate links.

Today’s post features Monica Lowe of Craftwich Creations. Monica can be found online in the Craftwich Creations Etsy shop, and on Facebook, Instagram, Ravelry, and Twitter. Today, I’ll be sharing an interview with Monica, followed by a review of her crochet hooks, and a giveaway for you to win your very own Craftwich portable crochet hook necklace! Read on for more details.

Left: My custom Craftwich hook. Right: The giveaway prize!

Left: My custom Craftwich hook. Right: The giveaway prize!

Interview

All images in the interview are copyright Craftwich Creations and used with permission.

Interview with Monica Lowe from Craftwich Creations with crochet hook review and giveaway on Underground Crafter

Underground Crafter (UC) How did you first get started working with wood?

Monica: I tried making my first hook a few years ago, and boy did it SUCK. HA! I used an oak dowel, which was so hard to hand carve with an Xacto blade. But I really got the hang of it after taking a class on hook carving with Jimbo (of Jimbo’s Front Porch) at Crochet@Cama four years ago. Once I started, I couldn’t seem to stop, and soon my husband was asking me WHAT was I going to do with all those hooks? Worked out how I liked to make my hooks, what worked best for me, and a business was born.

Craftwich Creations Studio.

Craftwich Creations Studio.

UC: What initially inspired you to make handmade crochet hooks?

Monica: In my crafting, I always have enjoyed the process more than the finished piece. It’s always a bit disappointing when it’s finished, no mater how cool it is. SO, when I moved to the Pacific Northwest, and was able to stay home with the kids, it was a natural progression to first wanting to know how to make my own yarn, and then my own tools. I want to know my craft from the beginning to end.

Craftwich Creations shawl pins, crochet hook necklaces, and other and accessories

Craftwich Creations shawl pins, crochet hook necklaces, and other and accessories

UC: Do you crochet yourself? If not, who tests out your new hook designs?

Monica: I crochet every night, on the couch, with my Ott light and my pillow, LOL! I’m a more advant-garde hooker, so I like unusual designs, and since I tend to have crafting Short Attention Span, I like to make shawls (asymmetrical are my faves) and other patterns with a variety of stitches. I do like to have anyone I see in person test my hooks – one can never have enough feedback.

Craftwich Creations knitting needles.

Craftwich Creations knitting needles.

UC: Many crocheters have never owned a handmade hook before, and you prefer to make custom hooks. Talk us through the process of working with a customer to create a great hook.

Monica: Well, my goal with my business is to make a piece of art for everyone, that is a useful tool also. If I don’t make something with someone in mind, then I want to make something that the wood tells me it wants to be. If someone is interested in my hooks, but doesn’t see one that leaps out at them (don’t laugh, it has literally happened at a craft show!) then they can request a custom order, which is SO much fun.

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First, I need to ask what kind of grip they have, small or larger hands, and whether they use a thumb, forefinger, etc. Any quirks they might have in their hook hold. For example, I have a knife hold in my left hand, and I use my fingers to throw off the yarn. (it was dubbed the “spider crawl” by Julia M. Chambers, who wrote an excellent series of articles in Interweave Crochet on hook holds). Since crochet hooks are held differently by literally each person, some of my natural hooks will NOT work for some people, and others will be PERFECT. I want to match people up with THEIR hook. Nothing makes me more pleased than hearing someone tell me, “it fits like it was made for my hand,” or “it caught my eye right away and I love it.” That means more to me than the money (although getting paid to make people happy is nice too).

I send pictures of the hook in progress as needed. It’s a small step to take, to make sure someone loves what they get.

Craftwich Creations kits and more.

Craftwich Creations kits and more.

UC: Do you have any crochet/crafty blogs or websites you visit regularly for inspiration or community?

Monica: I wish I had more time to visit all the blogs i WANT to! I spend most of my time on Facebook, I’m afraid. But some of the blogs I have visited, besides yours, include Moogly, ReCrochetions (Laurinda Reddig, the crochet designer, is a good friend of mine), Cre8tion Crochet, Crochet Concupiscence, Fresh Stitches, and….there’s more but my brain is not working.

Craftwich Creations crochet hooks and knitting needles.

Craftwich Creations crochet hooks and knitting needles.

UC: How are you celebrating NatCroMo this year?

Monica: I am actually going to keep doing what I am doing! I have sold most of last year’s hooks, so March will be a big carving month for me – more gorgeous crochet tools for all my fellow hookers!

UC: What’s coming up for Craftwich Creations?

Monica: I will be at a few craft shows this year around the Pacific Northwest, so watch my Facebook page for details.

I always like to explore fun new fiber crafting ideas that I can make for people…at the end of last year, I really got into the large Tunisian hooks, so I’m gong to be making more and trying to get more people to try it! What a blast.

Most exciting of all for me, I’m partnering up with Laurinda Reddig of Reversible Color Crochet book fame, to create an exciting new tri-monthly crochet kit. We’ll have top notch hand painted yarn, an exciting pattern, an accessory that goes with them that I make (AND an option to get a custom hook to go with!), and best of all – a story that ties everything together and adds excitement to the kit. We’re putting together the details now, and I can’t wait to introduce the kits to everyone! Watch for details on the Ficstitches Yarn website!

Thanks so much for stopping by, Monica, and sharing your love of creativity with us!


Craftwich Creations CrochetHook Review

My custom crochet hook from Craftwich Creations.

My custom crochet hook from Craftwich Creations.

I had a great conversation with Monica via Etsy convo and email. The process was just as she describes in the interview above, where I shared my preferences (for a tapered hook), my grip (knife hold), my eccentricities (using my forefinger heavily), and my favorite hook sizes (I through K). After back and forth discussion, I even sent her a video of me crocheting, and ultimately, she created a custom US K-10.5 (6.5 mm) crochet hook for me to review. You can see the hook in action and hear my full review in the video below.

What I like about this hook:

    • It’s visually appealing.
    • It’s very smooth.
    • It’s extremely lightweight.
    • It has a long handle to avoid the abrasion against the side of your hand that sometimes happens when you use the knife grip to hold your hook.
    • The hook has a tapered throat, which I prefer to an inline hook.
    • It has a wider circumference on the handle, allowing for a more relaxed grip while crocheting.
    • It’s custom made and it actually feels custom made. It’s like Monica jumped into my mind and knew exactly what I wanted! What an awesome conversation starter.

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What might take some getting used to about this hook:

  • Crocheters who prefer hooks with inline throats to tapered hooks may find it harder to pull the yarn through their loops with this hook – but I’m sure Monica could make another one that suits inline hook lovers.
  • Neither the company name nor the hook size are indicated on the hook, so you may not remember where to order from again. Similarly, you will need a Susan Bates Knit-Chek (or something similar) to check the hook size if you have multiple Craftwich hooks.
  • The hooks has a non-standard shape, so it may not fit into your existing hook holders.

Craftwich Creations crochet hooks currently sell for $18 – $26, depending on the size, style, and wood used. You can find more of Monica’s hooks and her other products, including wood buttons and knitting needles, in the Etsy shop here.

Full disclosure: A free review sample was provided by Craftwich Creations. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

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Giveaway

Monica from Craftwich Creation is offering up a portable crochet hook necklace for one lucky U.S. reader!

This could be yours! Perfect for crocheting on the go, or to pick up dropped stitches in knitting!

This could be yours! Perfect for crocheting on the go, or to pick up dropped stitches in knitting!

So stop by Craftwich Creations and let us know your favorite hook from the shop in the comments! Follow the instructions in the Rafflecopter widget below to enter for your chance to win by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday, April 7, 2015. Only entries logged through the widget will be eligible to win. Good luck!

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Swamp Hooks: Guest Post, Crochet Hook Review, and Giveaway!

Swamp Hooks Guest Post, Crochet Hook Review, and Giveaway on Underground CrafterToday is the third in a series of weekly posts where I feature an artisanal crochet hook maker, share a review of the hooks, and offer up a giveaway where you can win your very own hand crafted crochet hook!

Today’s post features Swamp Hooks. Amy Surratt is the maker behind the shop. All of Amy’s hooks are hand carved from genuine Southern swamp wood, and her shop’s tagline is “Southern grown, American made.” Amy stopped by today for a guest post, followed by my review of two Swamp Hooks, and a giveaway for a custom, wood carved crochet hook (!), so read on for details! UPDATE: Amy is also offering a 20% discount on anything in the Swamp Hooks Etsy shop for my readers with coupon code UNDERGROUND through Friday, April 10, 2015.

This post contains affiliate links.

Swamp Hooks Guest Post, Crochet Hook Review, and Giveaway on Underground CrafterGuest Post: Zen Lessons and Making Crochet Hooks

By Amy Surratt, Swamp Hooks

Carving crochet hooks was never something I had given much thought to. It was not on a bucket list or in some greater design for my life. It was something that just dropped in on me, unexpectedly and quite literally.

A branch from a cypress tree fell and landed just outside the door and it was pretty. It looked like it should be something and not just refuse left behind by a storm. After long consideration, my fiancé and I decided to try and see what we could do with it. Unfortunately the first few tries ended badly and didn’t really resemble crochet hooks all that much. As a matter of fact, many of the first hooks ended up being kindling in the fire place when the heads popped off or the entire thing just seemed to implode so I don’t really have a finished hook to hold up and say “This is it, the first hook from that first branch.”

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It did start a curiosity in both of us, though, that eventually blossomed into a joy, especially when the heads stopped popping off quite as often. It started us both looking around at trees and branches and wondering, “What could I make from that?” and “I wonder what the wood looks like.”

That was the first lesson I learned from carving crochet hooks. . . Sometimes happiness is not a goal to be struggled towards. Sometimes it drops out of the sky and lands at your feet. You just have to recognize it and the possibilities it opens up for you. We have both found that carving the hooks is something we enjoy to do. The way this branch or that will look when oiled, the smoothness of the hook when it is fully polished, using the natural curves and bends in a design. It is fun to do and we really enjoy it and we would never have tried it if Cypress trees didn’t have a habit of dropping branches at startlingly regular intervals.

The second lesson I learned was that carving random knobs and bumps is anything but a random act. I thought it would be easy — what could be easier than doing something completely random? I was wrong. To make something look random requires more thought than making it look like a swirly-doo. Humans tend to look for patterns in things and when you are carving that natural instinct sneaks in and before you know it, you are carving a set of uniform random bumps, evenly spaced and sized. To create something random you have to stop trying to create something random. You have to carve a bunch of separate things and focus not on the whole but on each thing and just trust the whole will work itself out in the end. It is not nearly as easy as it looks but it is also fun too. Pushing yourself to be random makes you see the wood grains and the knots and bends and work with them to create something different and unique.

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The third lesson is that it takes a whole lot of effort to make something look natural. This sounds paradoxical but as soon as you start carving something, the naturalness of it is harder to maintain because you’ve changed it. It’s the whole physics “observation changes things” paradox I think. Instead of trying to push your idea of the natural look, you have to work with the wood to see what it wants to be. The grain of the wood might want to flow one way even if you planned on it going another. The tightness of the grain pattern or shape of the grain swirls might make things you thought of doing not work as well. To make it look natural you have to stop being in control of the carving in a way and let go, see the wood and let all of those things show you how to make it natural looking. You have to surrender creative control to the wood so it can show you what it wants to be. Wow, that sounded amazingly hokey but it is true. Sometimes the wood has a personality to it and you have to work with that and allow it to guide you.

The fourth and last lesson is harder to put into words. When creating artwork, I find it easy to step back and know that what my finished product is, is what I wanted it to be. I can see the results and feel the pride of accomplishment. When we create a hook, we can see if it is neat looking and can feel if it is smooth but that final step is not ours. The creation of the hook is actually a two-step process. We love making the hooks but even when we are done and the hook is finished and it looks just like we wanted it to, that final validation doesn’t come until the person we gave it to or who bought it tells us, “I love the hook and it works great for me.”

The final product of our labors is the start, not the end. That final moment of stepping back and taking pride in what we have created happens when the hook finds a home and a hand that will use it. Hearing about people’s projects with our hooks is great. It is like we are part of a bigger series of events. What we love to do just flows into what other’s love and that is a very cool thing in my book.

So carving hooks is more than just a way to make money for us. It has been a very fun journey so far that has taught us things. We never thought it would or that we’d enjoy it so much but, the fact is, that stick on the ground started a passion in us. Today, I carved a butterfly on the end of a crochet hook made from an orange tree that has been giving us oranges for 20 years and finally got caught by a frost. It is beautiful and the tree, which by the way had the best oranges, becomes something new. That is a cool feeling to have.

The giveaway we are doing is for a hook of whatever size you want and whatever kind of handle design you like best. You can choose cypress, swamp mahogany, melaleuca, or orange wood as the material. We’ll work with you to make whatever kind of hook and size of hook that you want and it will be a one of a kind thing, just for you.

Swamp Hooks crochet hook review and giveaway on Underground Crafter

Swamp Hooks. From left to right: Original Swamp Hook in Cypress and Love Hook in Melaleuca.

Swamp Hooks Crochet Hook Review

Amy sent me two hooks to try out: a Melaleuca “Love Hook” in US H-8 (5mm) and a Cypress hook in US K-10.5 (6.5 mm). You can see the hooks in action and watch my full review video below.

Swamp Hooks are tapered crochet hooks available in several different styles.

The “Love Hook” has the type of “random” knobs that Amy discusses in her guest posts along with a heart shaped end. The Cypress hook is in their signature “Original Swamp Hook” style with bark on it for a rustic look.

What I like about these hooks:

  • Both hooks are incredibly smooth. I assume this is to the natural oils and beeswax Swamp Hooks uses to finish each hook. These are probably the smoothest wooden hooks I have ever worked with.
  • Both styles are visually appealing.
  • The Original Swamp Hook had a long handle to avoid the abrasion against the side of your hand that sometimes happens when you use the knife grip to hold your hook.
  • Both hooks have a tapered throat, which I prefer to an inline hook.
  • Both hooks have a wider circumference on the handle, allowing for a more relaxed grip while crocheting.
  • These hooks are created in a sustainable, ecologically friendly manner. The wood is gathered from fallen trees on their property and after hand carving, each is finished with natural oils and beeswax.

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What might take some getting used to about these hooks:

  • Most crocheters would probably take several uses to find a comfortable grip on the hooks with “random” knobs.
  • Crocheters who prefer hooks with inline throats to tapered hooks may find it harder to pull the yarn through their loops with this hook.
  • Both styles of hook have non-standard shapes, so they may not fit into your existing hook holders.

Swamp Hooks currently sell for $15 – $25, depending on the size, style, and wood used. You can find more of their hooks and their other products, including aprons and hair sticks, in the Etsy shop here.

Full disclosure: Two free review samples were provided by Swamp Hooks. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Giveaway

Amy from Swamp Hooks is offering up a special hook to one lucky U.S. reader! The winner can choose hook size, handle type, and material from options including Cypress, Melaleuca, Swamp Mahogany, and Orange Tree wood!

So stop by Swamp Hooks and let us know your favorite hook from the shop in the comments! Follow the instructions in the Rafflecopter widget below to enter for your chance to win by Friday, April 3, 2015. Only entries logged through the widget will be eligible to win. Good luck! UPDATE: Amy is also offering a 20% discount on anything in the Swamp Hooks Etsy shop for my readers with coupon code UNDERGROUND through Friday, April 10, 2015.

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NelsonWood: Crochet Hook Review and Giveaway

NelsonWood handmade wooden crochet hook review and giveaway on Underground Crafter

This is the second in a series of weekly posts during (Inter)National Crochet Month where I will feature an artisanal crochet hook maker, share a review of their hooks, and offer up a giveaway where you can win your very own hand crafted crochet hook!

Today’s post features NELSONWOOD. Bryan Nelson is the full-time wood turner/woodworker behind this shop. His Etsy shop sells a wide variety of handmade wood items, and features a Hooks & Yarn Bowls section. You can also find Bryan online on the NELSONWOOD website, Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter.

Bryan’s niece is a crocheter, and he started wood turning crochet hooks because “she just had to have a hook!” Bryan’s hooks are truly one of a kind and he doesn’t try to replicate the exact diameter of the handles or the exact length. He does make an effort to keep the grip handle of the hook between 5/8″ (1.5 cm) and 7/8″ (2 cm), unless the crocheter requests a larger custom diameter. This uniqueness is what keeps his customers coming back. He says, differences in grip diameter “hasn’t been an issue thus far and I’ve turned and sold hundreds and a lot of customer order multiple hooks.”

NelsonWood handmade wooden crochet hook review and giveaway on Underground Crafter

NELSONWOOD crochet hooks, wood turned by Bryan Nelson.

 

This post contains affiliate links.

Bryan sent me two US H-8/5 mm crochet hook to sample for a review. You can see the hooks in action and watch my full review in the video below.

NELSONWOOD hooks are inline crochet hooks where the point, throat, and shaft of the hook have the same circumference. The hook then has a lovely shaped grip handle that is composed of a variety of curves.

What I like about this hook:

  • It’s very smooth. The finish does’t “grip” the yarn and allows you to crochet quickly.
  • The wood includes beautiful and detailed grain.
  • The large grip diameter allows a comfortable, relaxed grip.
  • The handles come in multiple lengths so you could choose the option that works best for you to avoid any abrasion against the side of your hand that sometimes happens when you use the knife grip to hold your hook.
  • It has a beautiful design and is a great conversation starter!
NelsonWood handmade wooden crochet hook review and giveaway on Underground Crafter

Identifying the hook size on my NELSONWOOD hook with a Susan Bates KnitChek.

What might take some getting used to about this hook:

  • Neither the company name nor the hook size are indicated on the hook, so you may not remember where to order from again. Similarly, you will need a Susan Bates Knit-Chek (or something similar) to check the hook size if you have multiple NELSONWOOD hooks.
  • The shorter shaft of the hook may make it challenging to quickly create stitches with multiple yarn overs, like bullions or puffs.
  • Crocheters who prefer hooks with tapered throats to inline hooks may find it harder to pull the yarn through their loops with this hook. (Though I generally prefer tapered hooks, I found this one easy to use.)

NELSONWOOD hooks currently sell for $37.50 – $125, depending on the size and wood used. You can find more of Bryan’s wood turned hooks and his other products, including yarn bowls, bowls, birdhouses, pepper mills, and more in the Etsy shop here.

Full disclosure: Free review and giveaway samples were provided by NELSONWOOD. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Giveaway

Bryan has been kind enough to offer a great giveaway to one lucky reader! Follow the instructions in the Rafflecopter widget below to enter for your chance to win one of these two delightful NELSONWOOD crochet hooks by Tuesday, March 24, 2015. Leave a comment letting me know which crochet hook currently on sale in the NELSONWOOD Etsy shop is your favorite. Only entries logged through the Rafflecopter widget will be eligible to win. Good luck!

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Shepherd’s Custom Woodworking: Interview, Crochet Hook Review, and Giveaway!

Shepherds Custom Woodworking Crochet Hook Review and Giveaway on Underground Crafter

I’m very excited to be (almost) recovered from a cold that wiped me out for a few days so I can jump right back into the NatCroMo excitement! Today is the first in a series of weekly posts where I will feature an artisanal crochet hook maker, share a review of the hooks, and offer up a giveaway where you can win your very own hand crafted crochet hook!

Today’s post features Shepherd’s Custom Woodworking LLC. David Shepherd is the woodworker and maker behind the shop, and Kelly is responsible for the administrative work including listing items on Etsy. You can also find David and Kelly online on the Shepherd’s Woodworking Facebook page. Both David and Kelly have stopped by today for an interview, followed by my review of a Shepherd’s Custom Woodworking crochet hook, and a giveaway for another hook from the shop, so read on for details!

This post contains affiliate links.

Interview

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you first get started working with wood?

David: I started woodworking when I was 7 years old with my father in his wood shop in the barn behind the house. When I was in high school, I went to work in a cabinetry shop with my father. When the shop closed, I decided to open my own shop, Shepherd’s Custom Woodworking LLC, making custom cabinetry, furniture, and refinishing and repairing wooden items. And, later making fiber art tools.

UC: What initially inspired you to make handmade crochet hooks?

Kelly: Making crochet hooks was my sister’s Idea. I had bought her a pair for rosewood crochet hooks for her birthday a few years earlier and not since then seen wooden hooks for sale.

David: I borrowed a few hooks for examples and started experimenting. I broke a lot of heads off the crochet hooks before I was able to get it just right.

UC: Do you crochet yourself? If not, who tests out your new hook designs?

David: I was taught by a teacher in school when I was 8-9? years old. But I do not use that skill very often.

Kelly: I am the official hook tester and my sister gets called in sometimes to help test products.

The lovely crochet hook that I received from Shepherd's Custom Woodworking for the review.

The lovely crochet hook that I received from Shepherd’s Custom Woodworking for the review.

UC: Many crocheters have never owned a handmade hook before. Do you have a recommended wood or size for someone venturing into a handmade hook for the first time?

David: The wood hook can be fit to the person and their style better then a one-size-fits-all store bought hook. If you like a light weight hook, sure. A domestic wood like elm or maple would be great. You like your hook to have some weight? Madagascar ebony or blood wood is the way to go. You don’t like dark colors, ok, so yellow heart or maybe oak. You just want a hook none of your friends have, maybe something playful like leopard wood or zebra wood or one of our dyed woods? As far as the size hook, our suggestion is to pick a size you use often or a new size you want to try. The length and wider handle will help with hand fatigue and just make crocheting more comfortable .

At the fiber shows, we encourage someone looking for a new hook to touch them all. Each one has its own unique feel, almost an energy of their own. And when you find your hook you will know it.

UC: Do you have any crochet/crafty blogs or websites you visit regularly for inspiration or community?

David: No?

Kelly: I am on Ravelry every day. I have also been on your blog and have found several wonderful patterns.

UC: How are you celebrating NatCroMo this year?

Kelly: We will be in Michigan for the Spring Fiber Expo at the end of March. We will be having a sale in our Etsy shop. (UC comment: Use coupon code NATCROMO for a 10% discount off anything in the shop through March, 2015!)

UC: Where can people find you at upcoming events?

Kelly: We will be at several shows this year:

Thanks so much for stopping by, David and Kelly!

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Hook Review

David and Kelly sent me a purple heart/purple wood US J-10/6 mm crochet hook to sample for a review. You can see the hook in action and watch my full review in the video below. I also demonstrate how you can use this hook to create plump bullion stitches.

This is an inline hook where the point, throat, and shaft of the hook have the same circumference. There is a thumb rest and the hook is unusually long (approximately 8.25″ (21 cm). After the thumb rest, the hook tapers quite a bit.

What I like about this hook:

  • It’s very lightweight and smooth.
  • The purple heart/purple wood is a beautiful, purplish brown.
  • The company name and the year the hook was made are printed on the handle so you can easily find the artisan again if you’d like to order more.
  • The hook size is etched into the handle and filled in with a contrasting color so it’s easy to read.
  • The long handle allows you to avoid any abrasion against the side of your hand that sometimes happens when you use the knife grip to hold your hook.
  • The long handle’s taper makes it great for forming bullion stitches and other dimensional stitches like puffs that use many yarn overs.
  • The design is lovely so it’s a great conversation starter!

What might take some getting used to about this hook:

  • It is unusually long so it may not fit into your existing hook holders.
  • The finish, while smooth, grips the yarn a bit. I expect that over time/with frequent use this will diminish.
  • Crocheters who prefer hooks with tapered throats to inline hooks may find it harder to pull the yarn through their loops with this hook. (Though I generally prefer tapered hooks, I found this one easy to use.)

Shepherd’s Custom Woodworking hooks currently sell for $16.50 – $24, depending on the size and wood used. You can find more of their hooks and their other products, including yarn bowls, knitting needles, and more, in the Etsy shop here.

Full disclosure: A free review sample was provided by Shepherd’s Custom Woodworking LLC. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Giveaway

David and Kelly have been kind enough to offer a great giveaway to one lucky reader! Follow the instructions in the Rafflecopter widget below to enter for your chance to win a crochet hook from the Shepherd’s Custom Woodworking Etsy shop by Sunday, March 15, 2015. Only entries logged through the widget will be eligible to win. Good luck!

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NaBloPoMo BlogHer 2015-03  

I’m participating in BlogHer’s National Blog Post Month (also known as NaBloPoMo) by blogging daily through March, 2015.

Crochet Hook Review and Giveaway: Lantern Moon Featherlight Hooks

Every Sunday during National Crochet Month 2013, I’ll be reviewing crochet hooks.  Today’s post features Featherlight crochet hooks, along with a giveaway for one hook, courtesy of Lantern Moon Handcrafted.

Lantern Moon has a beautiful, sustainably produced wooden hook for all of you inline hook lovers!

Lantern Moon Featherlight crochet hook.

Lantern Moon Featherlight crochet hook.

The Featherlight is made with an eco-friendly wood with a rich, dark color.  Like most inline hooks, it has a flat throat.  The hook has a long thumb rest.  I found the tip to be slightly pointier than most inline hooks, which I liked.  The end of the handle has a nice decorative look to it.

The wood is finished smoothly, and has a wonderful feeling against the hand.  As the name suggests, it is very light weight.  According to Lantern Moon, the wood is “organically treated to add density and hardness.” The hook size (in US letter, number, and mm) is written in white towards the center of the handle, and is highly visible against the contrast of the dark wood.

There aren’t any unusual features on the handle that change its shape, so this hook would be ideal for all different types of crochet.  You could even make a small Tunisian crochet project on this hook, because while the thumb rest is long, it doesn’t taper outwards as so many do so it wouldn’t stretch out your stitches.

This would be a great hook for a crocheter who prefers an inline hook, who prefers purchasing eco-friendly and ethically produced products, and/or who enjoys the comfortable feeling of a wooden hook.

The hooks are available in US letter sizes from D through K.  The retail price of the hooks are $18.90.

And, it’s no secret that I love my Tulip Etimo crochet hooks.  These are probably the set I use most regularly.  Lantern Moon is now U.S. distributor for these and other Tulip products!

Full disclosure: A free review sample of this product was provided by Lantern Moon. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation from the distributor/manufacturer, nor do I guarantee a positive review.  My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions. You can read my complete review disclosure here.

Giveaway

When I contacted the nice folks at Lantern Moon to tell them about my plans to review a variety of crochet hooks during NatCroMo13, they were generous enough to send along a Featherlight US size I-9/5.5 mm hook for a giveaway for one lucky reader.

Lantern Moon prize pack

This giveaway is open internationally.  Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern time on Saturday, April 6, 2013.