Pineapple Lace! Roundup of 12 free crochet patterns #FlashbackFriday #LinkBlast

Pineapple Lace! 12 free crochet patterns, roundup curated by Underground CrafterOn Fridays, I share a link blast on Twitter and Facebook to get you excited about crocheting all weekend! In keeping with the #FlashbackFriday meme, I’m sharing patterns that were first released at least 12 months ago.

I love pineapple lace! (If you love crochet lace, too, or just want to try it out, you may enjoy my guide to 7 types of crochet lace.) It’s the perfect motif for the summer but, truth be told, I could crochet pineapples all year long.

All images are copyright the respective designer and are used with permission.



This post contains affiliate links.

Pineapple Lace! 12 free crochet patterns, roundup curated by Underground CrafterPicnic Basket Shawl (photo 5), free crochet pattern by @UCrafter (that’s me!): This lacy shawl in Malabrigo Sock includes 4 video tutorials.

Doubled Pineapples Fling Wrap (photo 9), free crochet pattern by @CrochetKim: This long rectangular wrap makes a bold statement.

Pineapple Tunic (photo 12), free crochet pattern by @MazKwok: This stunning tunic can be worn over a top. The free version of this pattern is available in size large. A paid version is available in sizes XXS through XXL.

Classic Crochet Openwork
Pineapple stitches are just one type of crochet lace in Jennifer Hansen’s Classic Crochet Openwork class on Craftsy. The class also covers filet crochet, Irish and Bruges lace, hairpin lace, and Solomon’s knot.

Berry Harvest Bandana Cowl (photo 11), free crochet pattern by @mooglyblog: This striking project can be worn as a buttoned cowl or triangular shawlette.

Pineapples for Everyone Shawl (photo 8), free crochet pattern by @UCrafter (that’s me!): This triangular shawl can be adapted in any yarn to your custom size and includes helpful progress photos.

Pineapple Sun Dress (photo 10), free crochet pattern by @CrochetKitten: This tutorial explains how to turn a pineapple motif into a fitted dress.

Pineapple Suncatcher (photo 2), free crochet pattern by @crochetmemories: This suncatcher includes 8 dainty pineapples and would look lovely in any window.

Pineapple Lace Stitch Shawl (photo 6), free crochet pattern by @MeladoraCrochet: This shawl can also be worn as a cape and includes both video and photo tutorials.

Berry Scarf (photo 3), free crochet pattern by @fivelittlemonst: This lacy scarf is made with just one skein of Red Heart Boutique Unforgettable.

Shop for Red Heart Boutique Unforgettable at your favorite retailer! Jo-Ann | Annie’s | Michaels | Amazon

Pineapple Expression 9”/12” Afghan Block Square (photo 7), free crochet pattern by Designs by Muggins: This pattern includes variations for a 9” and 12” version of a pineapple square.

Boutique Baby Top (photo 4), free crochet pattern by @CrochetKim: This adorable top is available in sizes 12 months and 18 months and is embellished with flowers and leaves.

Faerie Ears (photo 1), free crochet pattern by @CrochetKitten: These decorative ears are crocheted with silver wire.

If you enjoyed this roundup, follow my Crochet Lace board on Pinterest!

Crochet Lace Guide: An Introduction to 7 Types of Crochet Lace | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

Crochet Lace Guide: An Introduction to 7 Types of Crochet Lace by Underground Crafter with links to patterns and tutorials in broomstick lace, Bruges lace, filet crochet, hairpin lace, Irish crochet lace, pineapple stitch lace, and Tunisian crochet lace,A few weeks ago, I shared four tips to keep you crocheting in the heat of summer, and today, I’m adding another: working with crochet lace.

Summer is the perfect time to explore the many varieties of crochet lace. You can make stunning projects and learn new skills at the same time! In this post, I’ll be talking about seven different types of lace and sharing patterns, tutorials, books, and classes to help you get started.

This post contains affiliate links. All pattern images are copyright the respective designer and are used with permission.

Broomstick Lace

Broomstick lace is made using a broomstick handle or large knitting needle and a crochet hook. Get started with my free crochet pattern and tutorial, Quadrilateral: A Broomstick Lace Shawl.

Quadrilateral, a broomstick lace shawl, free crochet pattern and step-by-step photo tutorial by Underground Crafter.
Quadrilateral, a broomstick lace shawl, free crochet pattern and step-by-step photo tutorial by Underground Crafter.

You can take your broomstick lace to the next level in the Craftsy class, Beyond Basic Broomstick Lace, or with Donna Wolfe’s book, Broomstick Lace Crochet: A New Look at a Vintage Stitch with 20 Stylish Designs.

To learn more about broomstick lace, check out these posts:

Bruges Lace

Bruges lace, or Bruges crochet, mimics a style of lacework made famous in the Belgian city of Bruges. Learn Bruges Lace by Ellen Gormley is a great resource, or you can take her online class, Learn to Crochet Lace: Hairpin, Broomstick, and Bruges.

You may also enjoy the Bruges Lace Napkin Ring, a free crochet pattern by StitchesNScraps.

Bruges Lace Napkin Ring by StitchesNScrapsFilet Crochet

Filet crochet is a beginner-friendly type of lace using double crochet and chain stitches to form mesh. Filet crochet can be used to create simple or intricate designs. More intricate patterns are usually charted. If you’re new to filet crochet, use Kim Guzman’s tutorials to get started.

Crochet Lace Guide: An Introduction to 7 Types of Crochet Lace by Underground Crafter with links to patterns and tutorials in broomstick lace, Bruges lace, filet crochet, hairpin lace, Irish crochet lace, pineapple stitch lace, and Tunisian crochet lace,Or, try these four free filet crochet patterns! Clockwise from upper left corner:

Hairpin Lace

Hairpin lace is a technique where you create loops using a tool sometimes called a hairpin lace loom. This method takes a bit of getting used to since you have to hold an extra item in your hands, but it’s surprisingly simple once you get started. You can learn more about hairpin lace and find links to four free tutorials for beginners in this post, or in this tutorial by Celeste (Shellie) Dunn on AllFreeCrochet.

My favorite hairpin lace tool is the one made by Clover. I shared a detailed review here.

Hairpin lace1
A project on my Clover Hair Pin Lace Tool.

Irish Crochet Lace

Irish crochet lace was developed in the mid-1800s as an inexpensive alternative to Venetian lacework. It was taught by nuns to women throughout Ireland as a form of economic development.

So, what characterizes Irish crochet lace? Typically, motifs are crocheted and then joined on a mesh or lacy background.

The Mayapple Flower Square is one of my most popular free crochet patterns. The center flower is inspired by the traditional Irish crochet rose.

Mayapple Flower 6" Square, free #crochet pattern by Marie Segares @ucrafterIf you’re new to Irish crochet, my favorite resource is The Go-To Book of Irish Crochet Motifs by Kathryn White. (You can read my review here.)

If you’re ready to try an Irish lace garment, you may enjoy Myra Wood’s Learn Irish Freeform Crochet class on Craftsy.

Pineapple Stitch Lace

The pineapple stitch is a common vintage lace motif with many variations. It’s one of my personal favorite forms of crochet lace. I have several free crochet patterns featuring pineapple stitches including…

Picnic Basket Shawl, free #crochet pattern by Marie Segares in 4 parts with video #tutorial. Available at http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/picnic2015
Picnic Basket Shawl, a free crochet pattern that includes helpful video tutorials.
500 pix Pineapples for Everyone free pattern
Pineapples for Everyone Shawl, a free crochet pattern with helpful progress photos.
Tweedy Pineapples Scarf, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter
Tweedy Pineapples Scarf, a free crochet pattern.

I guess it isn’t really a form of lace, but rather a stitch pattern variation. But it’s a very fun way of playing with lace stitches!

Classic Crochet Openwork
Pineapple stitches are just one type of crochet lace in Jennifer Hansen’s Classic Crochet Openwork class on Craftsy. The class also covers filet crochet, Irish and Bruges lace, hairpin lace, and Solomon’s knot.

Tunisian Crochet Lace

While some people associate Tunisian crochet with a bulkier fabric, it can actually be used to make beautiful lace. If you’re new to Tunisian crochet, it’s a method using a specialized crochet hook with a stopper on the end because loops are left on the hook for the first part, or “forward” pass, of each row. These loops are then worked off in the second part, or “return pass” of each row.

Kim Guzman has done a lot of work to popularize Tunisian crochet lace. You can take her online Tunisian Cables & Lace class, and sometimes find her wonderful (but out-of-print) book, Learn to Do Tunisian Lace Stitches, used on Amazon. Although it isn’t lace-specific, you can find many lacy stitches in her Tunisian Crochet Stitch Guide, too.

What’s your favorite form of crochet lace?

 

 

#Crochet #TipsTuesday: Take Your Crochet Skills Up a Notch with These Seven Tutorials

Take Your #Crochet Skills Up a Notch with These 7 Tutorials #TipsTuesdayAs this year’s celebration of (Inter)National Crochet Month starts winding down, I reached out to several other crochet designers to ask what skills and techniques were most helpful to them in building their crochet skills. I got back some great answers that I’m sharing with you today. These tutorials and tips include things you may not have learned along the way. (I know it took me over 20 years of crocheting before I even heard about some of these skills.)



This post contains affiliate links.

1) Starting with a magic ring

The magic ring (or magic adjustable ring) is a great way to start projects that are crocheted in the round. It’s particularly helpful for making top down hats without a little “air hole” at the top. It also helps keep the stuffing inside of your amigurumi projects. Kristine Mullen from Ambassador Crochet shares her magic ring tutorial here.

Ambassador Crochet: How to Make a Crochet Magic Ring | Take Your #Crochet Skills Up a Notch with These 7 Tutorials #TipsTuesday
How to Make a Crochet Magic Ring Tutorial. © Ambassador Crochet and used with permission.

If you’re ready to try that magic circle on a project, here are some of my free crochet patterns that start with a magic ring.

2) Using invisible decreases

Most crocheters are not in love with decreases. While they can be necessary for your project, sometimes they just look terrible. Rebekcah Ferger from Rebeckah’s Treasures shares her tips for making invisible decreases in this video tutorial.

If you’re ready to try out your invisible decreases, try my free amigurumi pattern for the Gift Pocket Bear. It uses the single crochet version of an invisible decrease.

Craftsy

3) Smoothly increasing in the round

If you’ve been crocheting circles in the round, you may have noticed that when you consistently increase in the same spot, you end up with a hexagon rather than a circle. Jess Mason from Screen to Stitch shares her method for crocheting a smooth circle in this video tutorial.

Try out staggered increases in my free amigurumi pattern for the Chubby Sheep.

4) Building your confidence with freeform crochet

Many crocheters work exclusively from patterns because they are worried about “doing it wrong.” Patrice Walker from Yarn Over, Pull Through shares 3 ways freeform crochet boosted her confidence.

3 Ways Freeform Crochet Boosted My Crochet Confidence by Yarn Over, Pull Through | Take Your #Crochet Skills Up a Notch with These 7 Tutorials #TipsTuesday
A freeform crochet project. © Yarn Over, Pull Through and used with permission.

I did my own exploration of freeform crochet back in 2012 and I completely agree with Patrice. I took a wonderful freeform crochet and knitting class with Margaret Hubert. If you’d like to start your own freeform journey, Myra Wood offers both Freeform Crochet and Modern Irish Freeform Crochet classes on Craftsy.

 Take Your #Crochet Skills Up a Notch with These 7 Tutorials #TipsTuesday Take Your #Crochet Skills Up a Notch with These 7 Tutorials #TipsTuesday

 

 

5) End your projects invisibly

Hmmm, invisibility seems to be a theme here! But those finishing details can really make your crochet projects look fabulous. Kristine from Ambassador Crochet shares a tutorial for fastening off your projects invisibly.

Ambassador Crochet: How to Invisibly Fasten Off Your Crochet Project | Take Your #Crochet Skills Up a Notch with These 7 Tutorials #TipsTuesday
How to Invisibly Fasten Off Your Crochet. © Ambassador Crochet and used with permission.

6) Lining your crochet bags

We continue the finishing theme with a tutorial from Maria Bittner at Pattern Paradise for lining a crochet bag with fabric. Another great way to make your crochet bag more sturdy is to felt it. You can find my felting tutorial here, and try lining or felting my free Tunisian crochet pattern for the Basketweave Mini Messenger Bag.

7) Blocking your projects

I’ll admit it, I was as (or more) resistent to blocking as most crocheters. But once I actually tried it, I found that it makes my finished projects look a lot better than they did before. You can learn the blocking basics in this post.

Blocking Basics | Take Your #Crochet Skills Up a Notch with These 7 Tutorials #TipsTuesday
Spray blocking my Pineapples for Everyone Shawl.

If you’d like to try out blocking, here are several free crochet shawl patterns that will just bloom after blocking.

And, a few bonus tips

What crochet skills and techniques have helped you out the most?