Tag Archives: kim guzman

#FlashbackFriday Crochet Link Blast: Week 2: Softies

#FlashbackFriday crochet link blast by @ucrafter: softies

On Fridays, I share a link blast on Twitter and Facebook to get you excited about crocheting all weekend! Keeping with the #FlashbackFriday meme, I’m sharing patterns were first released at least 12 months ago.

Here’s an archive of this week’s crochet softies picks! All patterns and tutorials are free unless otherwise noted. All photos are copyright the respective designers and used with permission.

This post contains affiliate links.

Gift Pocket Bear, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares.

Gift Pocket Bear, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares.

Tessie Bear, free crochet pattern by Deborah Ziegler.

Tessie Bear, free crochet pattern by Deborah Ziegler.

Owlet Lovey, free crochet pattern by Jessie Rayot.

Owlet Lovey, free crochet pattern by Jessie Rayot.

Logan Baby Pig AmiPal, free crochet pattern by Mary Walker.

Logan Baby Pig AmiPal, free crochet pattern by Mary Walker.

Kaguya Hime Kokeshi Doll, free crochet pattern by The Sun and the Turtle.

Kaguya Hime Kokeshi Doll, free crochet pattern by The Sun and the Turtle.

Gema my kokeshi doll, free crochet pattern by Teresa Alvarez.

Gema my kokeshi doll, free crochet pattern by Teresa Alvarez.

Baby Duck, free crochet pattern by Corina Gray.

Baby Duck, free crochet pattern by Corina Gray.

Puppy Lovie, free crochet pattern by Sara Sach.

Puppy Lovie, free crochet pattern by Sara Sach.

Find more amigurumi books on Leisure Arts!

More Cute Little Animals Amy Gaines

Rainbow Rachael Doll, free crochet pattern by Beatrice Ryan Designs.

Rainbow Rachael Doll, free crochet pattern by Beatrice Ryan Designs.

Napolion Lion, free crochet pattern by Dedri Uys.

Napolion Lion, free crochet pattern by Dedri Uys.

Mike the Monster, free crochet pattern by Stacey Trock.

Mike the Monster, free crochet pattern by Stacey Trock.

Kelly's Teddy and Ball, free crochet pattern by Rebeckah Ferger.

Kelly’s Teddy and Ball, free crochet pattern by Rebeckah Ferger.

Easy Amigurumi Bunny, free crochet pattern by Sara Freisberg.

Easy Amigurumi Bunny, free crochet pattern by Sara Freisberg.

Dog Woobie, free crochet pattern by Posh Pooch Designs.

Dog Woobie, free crochet pattern by Posh Pooch Designs.

Baby Bunny, free crochet pattern by Celina Lane.

Baby Bunny, free crochet pattern by Celina Lane.

Design Your Own Monster Class, online crochet class on Craftsy!

Chenille Stuffed Easter Bunny, free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman.

Chenille Stuffed Easter Bunny, free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman.

Leonard & Lucy, free crochet pattern by Deborah Ziegler.

Leonard & Lucy, free crochet pattern by Deborah Ziegler.

I hope you enjoyed this roundup of free crochet softies patterns! If you like crochet lace, check out my Amigurumi – Crochet Pinterest board!

Follow Underground Crafter’s board Amigurumi – Crochet on Pinterest.

#FlashbackFriday Crochet Link Blast: Week 1: Lace

#FlashbackFriday crochet link blast by @ucrafter: lace

On Fridays, I share a link blast on Twitter and Facebook to get you excited about crocheting all weekend! Keeping with the #FlashbackFriday meme, I’m sharing patterns were first released at least 12 months ago.

Here’s an archive of this week’s crochet lace picks (along with a time-sensitive coupon code for a free Ravelry download)! All patterns and tutorials are free unless otherwise noted. All photos are copyright the respective designers and used with permission.

This post contains affiliate links.

  • Visit to the Kantcentrum, a beginner Bruges lace pattern with a photo tutorial by @UCrafter (me)! This crochet pattern is usually for sale but for the next 24 hours, this pattern will be free on Ravelry with coupon code #FFLace (through 3 p.m. Eastern on Saturday, April 11, 2015)!
Visit to the Kantcentrum, crochet pattern by Marie Segares.

Visit to the Kantcentrum, crochet pattern by Marie Segares.

Craftsy

Vintage Ruffled Coaster, free crochet pattern on the Crochet Memories Blog.

Vintage Ruffled Coaster, free crochet pattern on the Crochet Memories Blog.

Butterflies Shawl, free crochet pattern by Cheri McEwen.

Butterflies Shawl, free crochet pattern by Cheri McEwen.

Waves Scarf, free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman.

Waves Scarf, free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman.

Shell Baby Slippers, free crochet pattern by Rebeckahs Treasures.

Shell Baby Slippers, free crochet pattern by Rebeckah’s Treasures.

Mayan Sunset Shawl, free crochet pattern by Jaime George.

Mayan Sunset Shawl, free crochet pattern by Jaime George.

Extended Ripple, free crochet pattern by Jessie at Home.

Extended Ripple, free crochet pattern by Jessie at Home.

Broomstick Lace Baby Blanket, free crochet pattern and photo tutorial by Simply Collectible.

Broomstick Lace Baby Blanket, free crochet pattern and photo tutorial by Simply Collectible.

Spider Lace Throw, free crochet pattern by Heather Tucker.

Spider Lace Throw, free crochet pattern by Heather Tucker.

Penelope Shawl, free crochet pattern by Carolyn Christmas.

Penelope Shawl, free crochet pattern by Carolyn Christmas.

Easy Star Stitch Baby Blanket, free crochet pattern by AG Handmades.

Easy Star Stitch Baby Blanket, free crochet pattern by AG Handmades.

Bohemian Rhapsody Dress, free crochet pattern by High Strung Designs.

Bohemian Rhapsody Dress, free crochet pattern by High Strung Designs.

 I hope you enjoyed this roundup of free crochet lace patterns! If you like crochet lace, check out my Crochet Lace Pinterest board!

Follow Underground Crafter’s board Crochet Lace on Pinterest.

Interview with Rhelena from CrochetN’Crafts

Underground Crafter Crochet Specialty of the Month 2015

Welcome to my themed blog series, Crochet Specialty of the Month! Each month in 2015, I’ll feature a specialized crochet technique, stitch pattern, or project type through several posts.

As part of this month’s focus on broomstick lace, I’m sharing an interview today with Rhelena, the blogger behind CrochetN’Crafts. Rhelena shares free crochet patterns along with craft and sewing tutorials on her blog. Rhelena happens to have quite a few broomstick lace patterns and tutorials available, and I’m also sharing a mini roundup of my 4 favorite free broomstick lace crochet patterns from her collection.

This post contains affiliate links.

You can find Rhelena online at CrochetN’Crafts, or on Facebook, Pinterest, Ravelry, and Twitter. She also maintains a free pattern directory, Crochet Pattern Bonanza. All photos are copyright Rhelena/CrochetN’Crafts and are used with permission.

Interview with Rhelena from CrochetNCrafts on Underground Crafter with free crochet pattern roundup

Rhelena from CrochetN’Crafts.

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you first learn to crochet?

Rhelena: My sisters taught me the double crochet when I was kid. One of my older sisters and I crocheted a huge blanket using scrap yarn that someone had given us. After that I learned by following pattern books. In my late teens/early 20s, I began working with crochet thread and enjoyed making pretty doilies.

Broomstick Lace Wrap, free crochet pattern by CrochetN'Crafts.

Broomstick Lace Wrap, free crochet pattern by CrochetN’Crafts.

UC: What inspired you to start designing?

Rhelena: One of the biggest reasons behind it was that nothing ever fit me when I followed patterns. I’m very short, and it didn’t matter what pattern I followed it was always way too big for me. So I found it easier to just design my own from scratch. A few of my first patterns were a pair of slippers and a tank top.

Broomstick Lace Cowl, free crochet pattern by CrochetN'Crafts.

Broomstick Lace Cowl, free crochet pattern by CrochetN’Crafts.

UC: Several of your patterns include broomstick lace. How were you introduced to broomstick lace, and what do you enjoy about designing with it?

Rhelena: I learned about broomstick lace when I began to study the history of crochet. I was intrigued to discover that in the olden days, they had used actual broom sticks to create the lace. Knitting needles are commonly used today, which in my mind makes broomstick lace a cross between crochet and knitting. And for me it’s simpler than knitting because you work with only one needle and one crochet hook.

Kids Knook Value Pack

Another reason why I love broomstick lace is because it creates a nice lacy texture on the fabric. It’s great for wraps, blankets, and pretty much anything else you can think of.

An 18-inch doll dress Rhelena sewed for her niece.

An 18-inch doll dress Rhelena sewed for her niece.

UC: You also sew and share sewing tips on your blog. Do you have a favorite craft or does it depend on the project or season?

Rhelena: Crochet is by far my favorite hobby because it’s so easy to do. In school I was taught the very basics of knitting, but I soon discovered that holding one hook was far less complicated than trying to work with two knitting needles. At the same time, I love the gorgeous drape of knit fabrics and I hope to one day learn how to knit beautiful sweaters and other tops.

Shop Indie Patterns

As for sewing, at one point I had this crazy dream to be a seamstress. During the course of that dream I made quite a few pajamas and simple clothes for myself. I also made a graduation dress for my one niece and a doll dress for her younger sister. Both dresses were done in a satin material, which is difficult to work with. As a matter of fact, I ruined the first dress and had to go back to buy new material and start over. At that point I realized that although I enjoyed sewing, it wasn’t something I wanted to do for a living.

Broomstick Lace Chunky Crochet Scarf, free crochet pattern by CrochetN'Crafts.

Broomstick Lace Chunky Crochet Scarf, free crochet pattern by CrochetN’Crafts.

UC: What are your favorite crochet and sewing books in your collection?

Rhelena: The books that taught me how to read and follow crochet patterns will always be my personal favorites. My sister-in-law once gave me an old worn out book that gave you basic instructions on various arts and crafts, including crochet. I no longer have that book, but it will always have a special place in my heart because that book taught me how to read a crochet pattern. After that I resorted to those Leisure Arts pattern booklets that I picked up at Walmart. Two of my personal favorites are Dainty Little Doilies and Pineapple Doilies.

I also have a digital stitch directory that I’m finding very inspirational, especially when it comes to designing patterns.

Broomstick Lace Beaded Valance, free crochet pattern by CrochetN'Crafts.

Broomstick Lace Beaded Valance, free crochet pattern by CrochetN’Crafts.

UC: Do you have any crafty blogs or websites you visit regularly for inspiration or community?

Rhelena: Yes, there are many designers who inspire me. A few of my favorite websites are Cre8tion Crochet, Jessie At Home, Kim GuzmanPatterns For Crochet, and Red Heart. (UC comment: I previously interviewed Kim Guzman here.) I love their designs and seeing them inspires me to bring out my own creativity.

Thanks so much for stopping by, Rhelena, and sharing your love of broomstick lace with us!

April, 2015 Crochet Specialty of the Month: Broomstick Lace Crochet

Underground Crafter Crochet Specialty of the Month 2015

Welcome to my themed blog series, Crochet Specialty of the Month! Each month in 2015, I’ll feature a specialized crochet technique, stitch pattern, or project type through several posts.

I first discovered broomstick lace back in 2007. I was taking the Craft Yarn Council’s Certified Instructors Program in Crochet at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Arnetta Kenney, the fabulous instructor, gave us a sampling of different crochet techniques including broomstick lace.

This post contains affiliate links.

After the class,  I forgot about broomstick lace for a while. It was a tough time for me because my grandmother became ill and passed away shortly afterwards. She was my first crochet teacher and she inspired my love of the craft. One of the books I inherited from her happened to have a very well illustrated broomstick lace tutorial, which I later used to refresh my memory about Arnetta’s lesson.

Crocheting for Pleasure from my grandmother's collection.

Crocheting for Pleasure from my grandmother’s collection. You can read more about it in this post.

So, what is broomstick lace anyway?

Broomstick lace is a technique where you form loops with the aid of an object with a large diameter – such as a broomstick, knitting needle, large emory board, or folded cardboard – and then crochet into these loops to create lace. It’s also sometimes called jiffy lace.

300x250bAprilBanners

What’s special about broomstick lace?

To make broomstick lace, you only need to know basic crochet stitches, such as the chain and single crochet, but it looks much more complex.

Many broomstick lace patterns can be crocheted without turning with the right side facing.

To see more examples, check out my growing Broomstick Lace Crochet Pinterest board!

Follow Underground Crafter’s board Broomstick Lace Crochet on Pinterest.

Free Broomstick Lace Crochet Tutorials for Beginners Roundup

Roundup of 7 free broomstick lace tutorials for beginners on Underground Crafter

There are many great beginner broomstick lace tutorials online! Here are a few of my favorites.

blog Broomstick lace tutorial 4

  • Crochet Spot has a series of beginner and intermediate broomstick lace photo tutorials that you can access from this page. Each tutorial included step-by-step photos for righties and lefties.
From Crochet Spot's broomstick lace tutorials. Photo (c) Crochet Spot. Used with permission.

From Crochet Spot’s broomstick lace tutorials. Photo (c) Crochet Spot. Used with permission.

Beyond Basic Broomstick Lace Class on Craftsy!

I hope you enjoyed this post! I’ll be back later this month to share more broomstick lace crochet fun!

Have you tried broomstick lace crochet? If not, do you plan to try it now?

Giving Tuesday – The Crochet (and Knitting) Way

Today is Giving Tuesday, a national day of giving. I’m sharing some of my favorite crochet and knitting related charity links today in honor of this event, which encourages us to put aside the shopping for a moment during the holiday season. I hope this roundup with inspire you to share your talent (or money!) with charities that are important to you.

If you’re looking for a crochet-a-long, Sunset Family Living is hosting the annual 12 Days of Christmas Charity Challenge (also known as the NICU charity challenge). She is challenging people to crochet 12 hats for preemies in their local neonatal intensive care unit. Last year, over 26,000 (!) hats were donated as part of the challenge, which runs through January 6, 2015. 20 crochet designers have donated hat patterns, and if you’d like to sign up to participate, you can read more about the project here.

Dozen Baby Hats (in the round), a free knitting pattern by Denise Balvanz. Image (c) Denise Balvanz.

Dozen Baby Hats (in the round), a free knitting pattern by Denise Balvanz. Image (c) Denise Balvanz.

If you’re more of a hat knitter, check out Denise Balvanz’s free patterns, Dozen Baby Hats (in the round) and Dozen Baby Hats (knit flat). Both patterns were inspired by the Afghans for Afghans June-July Baby Shower, and are great projects to donate to a local charity, too.

Some designers sell specific patterns to raise funds for a favorite charity. Some of my favorites are the Mitered Cross Blanket (knitting) by Kay Gardiner. All proceeds from the sale of this pattern are donated to Mercy Corps, an international emergency response/disaster relief organization.

Mitered Crosses Blanket by Kay Gardiner. Image (c) Kay Gardiner.

Mitered Crosses Blanket by Kay Gardiner. Image (c) Kay Gardiner.

Dawn Hansen donates a portion of the proceeds from the sales of her Autism Awareness Puzzle Hat (knitting) pattern to the Autism SocietyCharity Windham’s Ten Stitch Twist for loom knitters pattern raises funds for Frankie Brown’s (interviewed here) favorite charity, the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation.  And speaking of Frankie Brown, she has has over 240 (!) free crochet and knitting patterns. She would greatly appreciate a donation to the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation through her Just Giving page.

Wheels within Wheels, one of my favorite patterns by Frankie Brown. Image (c) Frankie Brown.

Anastacia Zittel uses the same model, and appreciates a contribution to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America in exchange for her free knitting pattern, Armwarmers, or for any of her over 65 free crochet patterns. (I also interviewed Anastacia here.)

Alexis Winslow’s Caring Cowl (knitting) is another fundraiser pattern. Alexis donates proceeds from this pattern to the American Red Cross.

Caring Cowl by Alexis Winslow. Image (c) Alexis Winslow.

Caring Cowl by Alexis Winslow. Image (c) Alexis Winslow.

I donate $1 from each sale of my 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets ebook, which includes 20 crochet and 10 Tunisian crochet patterns that are great for pet blankets, to a local no-kill pet charity each year.

A selection of stitches included in 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets.

A selection of stitch patterns included in 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets.

I also donate pet blankets in the sizes suggested by the Snuggles Project. (I interviewed Deborah Green from Bideawee about blanket donations here, if you’d like to hear how local shelters use these blankets.) The website allows you to search for a local pet charity that accepts handmade blankets. The Snuggles Project is a program of Hugs for Homeless Animals.

Another organization that accepts handmade goodies is Project Linus. Their mission is to “provide love, a sense of security, warmth and comfort to children who are seriously ill, traumatized, or otherwise in need through the gifts of new, handmade blankets and afghans, lovingly created by volunteer ‘blanketeers.'”You can find out more about donating a crocheted or knit (or sewn) blanket to a local chapter, contributing funds to help defray shipping costs or volunteering on their website.

The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet. Image (c) Bella Crochet.

The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet. Image (c) Bella Crochet.

If donating an entire blanket is out of your crochet comfort zone, Warm Up America is another charity that distributes blankets and accessories to a variety of social services agencies. You can send a blanket square, or accessories such as hats or scarves to them for distribution. The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet is a great free crochet pattern for making children’s hats for charity.

Twisted Cable Scarf and Headband, a free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman. Image (c) Kim Guzman.

Twisted Cable Scarf and Headband, a free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman. Image (c) Kim Guzman.

You might also be interested in the Red Scarf Project from Foster Care to Success. Each year, they coordinate the delivery of Valentine’s Day care packages, including handmade scarves, to young adults who have aged out of foster care as they experience life on their own at college. You can learn more about this charity in the current issue of Crochetvolution here. There are also two great free crochet patterns in this issue, Big Red and Vino Scarf, that would make great projects for the Red Scarf Project. You can also try some of Kim Guzman’s many great free winter patterns. (I interviewed Kim here.) Two of my favorites that would be perfect for the Red Scarf Project are the Reversible Pinstripe Scarf (double-ended crochet) or the Twisted Cable Scarf.

What are your favorite charities to share your crochet and knitting with?