Tag Archives: leisure arts

#FlashbackFriday Crochet Link Blast: Week 3: Kitchen

Roundup of over 25 free crochet patterns for the kitchen on Underground Crafter

On Fridays, I share a link blast on Twitter and Facebook to get you excited about crocheting all weekend! Keeping with the #FlashbackFriday meme, I’m sharing patterns were first released at least 12 months ago.

Here’s an archive of this week’s crochet kitchen picks! There are over 30 patterns in all!

All patterns and tutorials are free unless otherwise noted. All photos are copyright the respective designers and used with permission.

This post contains affiliate links.

Filet Table Runners

Filet Table Runners pattern booklet by Joyce Geisler for sale on @LeisureArtsInc. Threadies will love decorating their kitchens with these table runners! Add all 8 patterns to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Granny Square Apron, free crochet pattern by Sara Freisberg.

Granny Square Apron, free crochet pattern by Sara Freisberg.

Granny Square Apron by @TangledHappy: This quick and easy apron will add some flare to your cooking routine. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Set of Ombre Coasters, free crochet pattern and photo tutorial by Marinke Slump.

Set of Ombre Coasters, free crochet pattern and photo tutorial by Marinke Slump.

Bread Basket kit, for sale on @beCraftsy. Free crochet pattern by @mymountainus is available here. This basket would make a great centerpiece for an eat-in kitchen table! Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Ripple Puff Cleaning Cloth, free crochet pattern by Tamara Kelly.

Ripple Puff Cleaning Cloth, free crochet pattern by Tamara Kelly.

Cozies and Mug Hugs

Easter Crochet Fishes by @MYpicot: These adorable hard boiled egg cozies will brighten up lunchtime year round. This pattern uses international crochet stitch symbols. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Basketweave Cup Cozy, free crochet pattern by One Dog Woof.

Basketweave Cup Cozy, free crochet pattern by One Dog Woof.

Basketweave Cup Cozy by @1dogwoof: This one fits a Starbucks style cup, so it’s perfect for those of you without a coffee maker. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Textured Coffee Mug Hug, free crochet pattern by Articles of a Domestic Goddess.

Textured Coffee Mug Hug, free crochet pattern by Articles of a Domestic Goddess.

Textured Coffee Mug Cozy by @ArtofaDG: I love the gentle texture combined with the button! Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Good Night Mug Hug by Michele Wilcox on @RedHeartYarns: This cute mug hug is perfect for a late night cup of tea or hot milk. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Leah's Tea Rose Cozies, free crochet pattern by Leah Maxwell.

Leah’s Tea Rose Cozies, free crochet pattern by Leah Maxwell.

Leah’s Rose Tea Cosies by Leah Maxwell: Big roses add a striking look to your teapot! Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Coffee Cup Cozy, free crochet pattern by Mistie Bush.

Coffee Cup Cozy, free crochet pattern by Mistie Bush.

Coffee Cup Cozy by @CrochetAmerican: This simple cozies can be easily customized with different color yarn. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites hereI previously shared a roundup of Mistie Bush’s free crochet patterns here.

Criss-Cross Reversible Mug Cozy, free crochet pattern by CrochetN'Crafts.

Criss-Cross Reversible Mug Cozy, free crochet pattern by CrochetN’Crafts.

Criss-Cross Reversible Mug Cozy by @crochetncrafts: This easy pattern makes a great last minute gift. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites hereI previously interviewed Rhelena from CrochetN’Crafts and shared a roundup of her free crochet patterns here.

Twisted Stitches Coffee Cozy, free crochet pattern by Beatrice Ryan Designs.

Twisted Stitches Coffee Cozy, free crochet pattern by Beatrice Ryan Designs.

Twisted Stitches Coffee Cozy by @BeaRyanDesigns: There are already several variations in the picture, but this design is just calling out for you to add your own! Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Personalized Mother's Day Gifts

 

Coasters and Potholders

Flower Coasters, free crochet pattern by Janaya Chouinard.

Flower Coasters, free crochet pattern by Janaya Chouinard.

Flower Coasters by @CharmedByEwe: These also make great face scrubbies. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Bean Stitch Coasters, free crochet pattern with photo and video tutorials by Meladora's Creations.

Bean Stitch Coasters, free crochet pattern with photo and video tutorials by Meladora’s Creations.

Bean Stitch Coasters by @MeladoraCrochet: This pattern includes both video and photo tutorials. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Platypus Potholder, free crochet pattern by Cordelia Serene.

Platypus Potholder, free crochet pattern by Cordelia Serene.

Platypus Potholder by Cordelia Serene: This cute potholder features one of my favorite mammals and will bring a smile to your face. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Chain Stitch Coasters, free crochet pattern by Sarah Zimmerman.

Chain Stitch Coasters, free crochet pattern by Sarah Zimmerman.

Chain Stitch Coasters by @RepeatCrafterMe: These coasters are a great beginner project since they are constructed with a hot glue gun. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Roller Coasters, free crochet pattern by Haak Maar Raak.

Roller Coasters, free crochet pattern and tutorial by Haak Maar Raak.

Roller Coasters by @HaakMaarRaak: This crochet pattern also includes a tutorial for the surface embroidery. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Vintage Coasters, free crochet pattern by Anabelia Handmade.

Vintage Coasters, free crochet pattern by Anabelia Handmade.

Vintage Coasters by Anabelia Handmade: These stunning thread crochet coasters have a delightful look. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Coffee Hot Pad, free crochet pattern by Sara Sach.

Coffee Hot Pad, free crochet pattern by Sara Sach.

Coffee Cup Hot Pad by @PoshPoochDesign: This is the perfect gift for your favorite caffeine addict, er, um, I mean, your favorite coffee lover. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Tutti Frutti Potholders, free crochet pattern and tutorial by Marinke Slump.

Tutti Frutti Potholders, free crochet pattern and tutorial by Marinke Slump.

Set of Ombre Coasters (add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here) and Tutti Frutti Potholders (add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here) by @acreativebeing: These patterns include photo tutorials and options for customization.

Wiggle It Crochet Trivet and Dishcloth Set, free crochet pattern by Tamara Kelly.

Wiggle It Crochet Trivet and Dishcloth Set, free crochet pattern by Tamara Kelly.

Wiggle It Trivet and Dishcloth Set by @mooglyblog: This set adds bright colors and texture to your kitchen. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites hereI previously shared an interview with Tamara Kelly here.

RSS Feed Potholder, free crochet pattern by Book People Studio.

RSS Feed Potholder, free crochet pattern by Book People Studio.

RSS Potholder by Book People Studio: This makes a great gift for your favorite blog or podcast lover! Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Towels, Scrubbies, and Cloths

Spring Granny Dishcloth, free crochet pattern by Tia Davis.

Spring Granny Dishcloth, free crochet pattern by Tia Davis.

Spring Granny Dishcloth by @CrochetRochelle on @craftown: These brightly colored dishcloths will make dishwashing less of a chore. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Crochet Edged Tea Towels, free crochet pattern by Kara Gunza.

Crochet Edged Tea Towels, free crochet pattern by Kara Gunza.

Crochet Edged Tea Towel by @petalstopicots: Customize your store bought tea towels with a lovely crochet edging! Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Sigmund Wash Cloth, free crochet pattern by Snappy Tots.

Sigmund Wash Cloth, free crochet pattern by Snappy Tots.

Sigmund Wash Cloth by @SnappyTots: This cute washcloth pattern includes a photo tutorial. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Cross-Stitched Cloths Kitfor sale on @beCraftsy. Free crochet pattern by @LionBrandYarn is available here. This simple pattern has a vintage look. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Tartan Plaid Wash Cloths by @HappyBerryUK: There is a video tutorial, as well as a written pattern, for crocheting these cheery washcloths. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Cotton Pot Holder with a Flower, free crochet pattern by What You Sow.

Cotton Pot Holder with a Flower, free crochet pattern and tutorial by What You Sow.

Cotton Pot Holder with a Flower by @whatyousow: This pattern includes a step-by-step photo tutorial. Add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

Strawberry Basket Tunisian Dishcloth, free crochet pattern by Tamara Kelly.

Strawberry Basket Tunisian Dishcloth, free crochet pattern by Tamara Kelly.

Ripple Puff Cleaning Cloth (add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here); Rainbow Flower Scrubby Dishcloth (add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here); and Strawberry Basket Tunisian Dishcloth (add to your Ravelry queue or favorites here) by @mooglyblog: These patterns are a great way to add color to your kitchen!

Rainbow Flower Scrubby Dishcloth, free crochet pattern by Tamara Kelly,

Rainbow Flower Scrubby Dishcloth, free crochet pattern by Tamara Kelly,

I hope you enjoyed this roundup of free crochet patterns for the kitchen! If you like crochet home decor, check out my Crochet for Home Pinterest board!

Follow Underground Crafter’s board Crochet for Home on Pinterest.

Blog Tour: Tunisian Crochet for Baby – Mini Interview with Sharon Silverman

This post contains affiliate links.

I’m excited to share a mini interview with Sharon Silverman today as part of her blog tour for Tunisian Crochet for Baby. Sharon is a designer, author, and instructor based in West Chester, Pennsylvania. Tunisian Crochet for Baby is her seventh crochet book, and she has more in the works. I previously interviewed Sharon here and she wrote a guest post here.

Like me, Sharon is a professional member of the Crochet Guild of America, and she is also a design member of The National NeedleArts Association. You can find her online on her website, on Ravelry (as CrochetSharon or on her designer page), on Facebook, and on Pinterest. I’ll also be sharing a giveaway for the new book at the end of this post, so read on for details!

Mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her book Tunisian Crochet for Baby on Underground Crafter blog.

Sharon Silverman

Underground Crafter (UC): What was your inspiration for writing Tunisian Crochet for Baby?

Sharon: On the design side, I have been a huge fan of Tunisian crochet ever since I came upon it in a stitch dictionary. It lets me create all sorts of fabrics and textures that are impossible in regular crochet. I am always glad to find an opportunity to share Tunisian techniques with other crocheters. Baby items, including garments, are very popular and seemed to be the logical next step after my books on scarves and pillows (both from Stackpole Books), and a Leisure Arts title, Tunisian Baby Blankets.

Mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her book Tunisian Crochet for Baby.

Washcloth Quartet.

UC: In your guest post, you mentioned some of the things you love about the look of Tunisian crochet. What about it do you find especially suited to baby projects?

Sharon: Because of their small size, baby projects aren’t too intimidating. The investment in time and materials is much less than it would be for something like an adult sweater. Baby items present a unique opportunity to learn a new skill and end up with a great finished project that can be crocheted quickly. Tunisian crochet stitch patterns seem very well suited to baby items, refreshingly different from typical double crochet fabric. I think crocheters will welcome the opportunity to try these new designs.

And with new babies entering the world all the time, crocheters always need things to make for those precious bundles! I included a variety of items to fit different skill levels, styles, and sizes from newborn through 12 months.

Mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her book Tunisian Crochet for Baby on Underground Crafter blog.

Sherbet Stripes Blanket.

UC: If a Tunisian crochet newbie was to pick up this book, what’s the first project you’d recommend to get them hooked, so to speak?

Sharon: Start with the Nursery Box and the simple stitch washcloth from the Washcloth Quartet. I would also suggest the Sherbet Stripes Blanket. It has some color changes, but the pattern itself is simple and straightforward. The matching Sherbet Stripes Hat would be a good follow-up for someone who is ready to go to the next level.

UC: And which project would you recommend for an experienced Tunisian crocheter who wants to try something new?

Sharon: The Christening Gown (with matching bonnet and booties) is a complex project with a Tunisian X-stitch pattern and some intricate shaping. For something that will be worn more often, the Zippered Hoodie will keep experienced crocheters engaged.

Mini interview with Sharon Silverman about her book Tunisian Crochet for Baby on Underground Crafter blog.

Christening Gown, Bonnet, and Booties.

UC: What else would you like us to know about Tunisian Crochet for Baby?

Sharon: All of the yarn I chose is washable. Every pattern includes written instructions and at least one symbol chart. Photo tutorials are included.

Thanks so much for stopping by Sharon! 

If you’d like to learn Tunisian crochet online, try these Craftsy classes: Online Tunisian Crochet Class and Custom-Fit Tunisian Crochet (w/ Dora Ohrenstein)!

Giveaway

Stackpole Books is giving a copy of Tunisian Crochet for Baby to one lucky reader with a U.S. mailing address! For your chance to win, check out Stackpole’s lookbook for Tunisian Crochet for Baby, and let me know which project you would make first. Then be sure to log your entry into Rafflecopter! One winner will be chosen at random. Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday, September 16, 2014.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Guest Post: Sharon Silverman on Tunisian Crochet

This post contains affiliate links.

Today, I’m sharing a guest post with Sharon Silverman as part of her blog tour for her latest book, Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets.  I previously interviewed Sharon here as part of her blog tour for Crochet Scarves: Fabulous Fashions – Various Techniques.  I was all ready to write an introduction to Sharon, but she’s been kind enough to introduce herself in the guest post!  You can also find links to where to find her online at the end of her post.  All photos are copyright Sharon Silverman and used with permission.

I’ve inserted a few comments in purple.  Enjoy the post!

Tunisian Crochet Hits Its Stride

by Sharon Silverman

Tunisian Honeycomb Stitch.

Tunisian Honeycomb Stitch.

Thank you to Underground Crafter for the invitation to write a guest blog. I’m delighted to have the opportunity to share my thoughts on Tunisian crochet.

First, a little bit about me. I became a crochet designer in a roundabout way. After writing several travel guides for Stackpole Books, editor Kyle Weaver asked me to do another guide to an area about ninety minutes away from my home. It just wasn’t the right project for me. My children were little, it would have involved a lot of commuting, and I didn’t have the essential insider knowledge that the book deserved. However, we really liked working together, and Kyle mentioned that Stackpole had just started a craft line. His exact question to me was, “Can you do anything?”

Why, yes! I crochet. The timing was perfect, since Stackpole had just released Basic Knitting. They hired me to write Basic Crocheting: All the Skills and Tools You Need to Get Started. I rediscovered my love of the craft, was introduced to the fabulous yarn produced today, met a lot of fantastic designers, developed a great working relationship with photographer Alan Wycheck and editors Mark Allison and Kathryn Fulton at Stackpole, and have never looked back. After that first volume, I wrote Beyond Basic Crocheting, Tunisian Crochet: The Look of Knitting with the Ease of Crocheting, Crochet Pillows, Crochet Scarves, and Tunisian Crochet for Baby (coming September 2014), all for Stackpole; and Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets for Leisure Arts. My designs have appeared in the 2006 Crochet Pattern-a-Day Calendar and in Crochet Red: Crocheting for Women’s Heart Health (reviewed by Marie here).  I am a design member of The National NeedleArts Association and a professional member of the Crochet Guild of America. I have taught at venues large and small, and was featured on three episodes of HGTV’s “Uncommon Threads.”

When I was browsing through a stitch dictionary while designing for Beyond Basic Crocheting, I came across something I hadn’t seen before: Tunisian crochet. I didn’t have a long Tunisian hook, but I tried a few stitches on a regular crochet hook. Wow! I had never seen fabric like that created with a crochet hook. It immediately hit me that Tunisian crochet was the perfect solution to the problem I refer to as “rivers of double crochet.” That look does not have much to commend it, in my opinion, and I am always disappointed when I see it in today’s designs. (I think when people disparage crochet, that’s the style they’re reacting to. Can’t blame ’em.)

Anyway, Tunisian had none of that “loopy” look. I started with a swatch of Tunisian simple stitch. It went so fast! I remember laughing out loud because it was simply so much fun to do. Soon I grabbed some scrap variegated yarn to see how that would look. The way the colors on the return pass appeared between the vertical bars of the forward pass…it was stunning. In short order I tried every single Tunisian stitch pattern in that book. Wait a minute: you mean I can make fabric that looks knitted and purled? Lace? Cables? Relief stitches without having to work around a post? And I can do all of that with a crochet hook? I’m in!

Tunisian Checkerboard Stitch (Medium)

Tunisian Checkerboard Stitch.

After putting one Tunisian pattern in Beyond Basic Crocheting, I started thinking about a book with all Tunisian patterns. With the right size hook and the right weight of yarn, Tunisian didn’t have to be bulky or just for blankets. It was perfect for garments and accessories as well. I wanted to call the book Tunisian Crochet: Not Just for Afghans Anymore! but Stackpole preferred the more sedate Tunisian Crochet: The Look of Knitting with the Ease of Crocheting.

At that time is wasn’t unusual for crocheters to say, “Huh?” when I mentioned Tunisian crochet. But everyone I taught it to was crazy about it. This was near the beginning of what I happily think of as the Tunisian crochet renaissance. Other designers were discovering or re-discovering Tunisian and doing fantastic things with it.

Fast forward to today. The Tunisian crochet group on Ravelry has almost 5,000 members—we’re waiting for you! Major magazines now feature Tunisian patterns as a matter of course. And the books! Scads of books either exclusively Tunisian crochet, or with a substantial number of patterns. The Tunisian Crochet Group on Yahoo is an excellent resource and a place to get questions answered. And, of course, you can check YouTube for tutorials.

One indefatigable proponent of Tunisian crochet is Kim Guzman (interviewed by Marie here). I think I have all of her Tunisian crochet books. Kim wrote a wonderful post encouraging all of us to be Tunisian crochet cheerleaders. You can read it here.

Along with Kim, many other designers are hard at work creating fantastic Tunisian patterns. I hesitate to name them because I know I’ll forget somebody—whoever you are, please forgive me, and post your name in the comments!—but some people whose work you might be interested in are Doris Chan, Dora Ohrenstein (interviewed here, book reviews here and here), Kristin Omdahl, Robyn Chachula (book review here), Vashti Braha (interviewed by Marie here), Marty Miller, Lily Chin, Karen Whooley, Sheryl Thies (book review by Marie here), Tammy Hildebrand (interviewed by Marie here), Darla Fanton, Jennifer Hansen, and others. A quick search for “Tunisian crochet” on Amazon gives a long list of titles.

As for my own work, my most recent Tunisian publication is Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets from Leisure Arts, available here.  (Ravelry members can see the book’s patterns on its source page here.)

TCBB cover (Medium)

The book gave me the opportunity to try some interesting Tunisian techniques, including stranded colorwork. I used that for the Bright Strands blanket.

Bright Strands (Medium)

Tunisian Crochet for Baby is currently going through the editing process. Here is a sneak peek at some of the projects.

Sharon Silverman Sneak Peak Collage

I hope you are inspired to do some projects in Tunisian crochet! Please share them with me on my Facebook page and my website. You are welcome to visit my Pinterest page also. Happy crocheting!

 

Thanks for stopping by, Sharon!