Tag Archives: patons classic wool

Free knitting pattern: Ladder Stitch Cowl

Ladder Stitch Cowl (or Scarf), free #knitting pattern by Underground CrafterWhen I discovered knitting slip stitches, I became a much happier person.



This post contains affiliate links. Yarn for the sample was generously provided by Spinrite LP.

That may sound like a bold statement, but it’s true! I always liked the look of knitting color work, but have realized over the years that maintaining tension for stranded knitting some times drives me mad and working with bobbins for intarsia doesn’t seem to go over so well with my cats.

I still love to play around with colors, so slip stitches are the perfect solution. I can make vibrant, colorful projects while using just one color on each row.

Ladder Stitch Cowl (or Scarf), free #knitting pattern by Underground CrafterI made this cowl as a sample of the Ladder Stitch pattern for one of my knitting classes, using the yarn I had left over from the Hearts and Kisses Cowl, a pattern that was published in the February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.

Hearts and Kisses Cowl, crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.

The Hearts and Kisses Cowl, published in I Like Crochet.

I  have to say that I really liked the way it turned out. The texture is wonderful, and I love the colors, too. I’ve included instructions for making a scarf, too. And, if you’d like a felted version, you can find a tutorial for felting in the washer and dryer here.

Don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or with my Facebook page if you make one!

Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy

Creative Crochet Workshop

ILK 300x250b February 2016 BannersLadder Stitch Cowl (or Scarf)

Knitting Pattern by Underground Crafter

02-easy 50US terms 504-medium 50Use slip stitches to easily create a seemingly complex color and texture pattern while using just one yarn in each row.

Finished Size

  • Adult: 7” (18 cm) width x 22.5” (57 cm) circumference (unblocked).

Materials

  • Patons Classic Wool Worsted (100% wool, 3.5 oz/100 g, 210 yd/192 m) – 1 skein each in 77308 Wisteria (CA) and 77404 Orchid (CB), or approximately 100 yd (91.5 m) in each of 2 colors in any medium weight yarn.
  • US 7/4.5 mm knitting needles, or any size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn needle.

Shop for Patons Classic Wool Yarn on Craftsy | Amazon

Gauge

  • 21 sts x 29 rows in pattern = 4” (10 cm) unblocked. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • BO – bind off
  • CA – Color A
  • CB – Color B
  • CO – cast on
  • k – knit
  • p – purl
  • rep – repeat
  • RS – right (front) side
  • sl – slip stitch
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • wyib – with yarn in back
  • wyif – with yarn in front
  • * Rep instructions after asterisk as indicated.

Pattern Notes

  • Always slip first stitch of each row knitwise with yarn in back.
  • Always slip all other stitches purlwise with yarn positioned as indicated in the pattern.
  • Cowl is knit flat and then seamed. Instructions for making a scarf instead are included in the directions. Yarn requirements will vary.

Pattern Instructions

Cowl

  • With CA, C0 37 sts (or a multiple of 6 sts, +13).
  • Border Row 1: With CA, sl l 1, k to last st, p1.
  • For cowl, continue to Row 1. For scarf, rep Border Row 1 – 3 times.
  • Row 1: (RS) With CA, sl 1, k5, *sl 1 wyib, k5; rep from * across to last 7 sts, sl 1 wyib, k5, p1.
  • Row 2: With CA, sl 1, k3, p2, *sl 1 wyif, p5; rep from * across to last 7 sts, sl 1 wyif, p2, k3, p1.
  • Row 3: With CB, sl 1, k3, *k5, sl 1 wyib; rep from * across to last 9 sts, k8, p1.
  • Row 4: With CB, sl 1, k3, p5, *sl 1 wyif, p5; rep from * across to last 4 sts, k3, p1.
  • Rep Rows 1-4 until cowl measures approximately 22” (56 cm) long, or until desired length is reached. Fasten off CB.
  • Rep Rows 1 & 2 once more.
  • For cowl, BO in pattern for Border Row 1. Fasten off CA with long yarn tail for seaming.
  • For scarf, rep Border Row 1 – 4 times, BO in pattern for Border Row 1. Fasten off CA.

Finishing

  • Spray block if desired.
  • For cowl, thread yarn tail through yarn needle and seam short edges together on wrong side with whipstitch join. (A photo tutorial for a whipstitch join is available here.) Turn cowl right side out.
  • For cowl and scarf, weave in ends with yarn needle.
© 2016 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link:  http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2016/03/30/free-knitting-pattern-ladder-stitch-cowl. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or with my Facebook page if you make one!

Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy

New Patterns in February, 2016 Issue of I Like Crochet

This post contains affiliate links.

ILC-February 2016-coverI’ve mentioned before how much I enjoy I Like Crochet magazine. I’ve had the pleasure of designing patterns and writing articles for several issues of this digital magazine since it launched in 2014.


I recently designed two patterns for the February, 2016 issue. (All photos in this post are © I Like Crochet and used with permission.)

The Hearts and Kisses Cowl is a great project for Valentine’s Day, or just to keep warm on a chilly afternoon.

Hearts and Kisses Cowl, crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.This buttoned cowl is crocheted flat, with heart appliques added for visual interest.

Hearts and Kisses Cowl, crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.My version was crocheted with one skein each of Patons Classic Wool Worsted yarn in Orchid and Wisteria. You can add it to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

The Hooked Haberdasher

The other pattern I designed for this issue is the Oceanic Chevron Pillow.

Oceanic Chevron Pillow, crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.I don’t think my love of chevrons and ripples is a secret…

Oceanic Chevron Pillow, crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.The same could probably be said for my fascination with buttons. This was made with one skein each of Lion Brand Heartland in Glacier Bay and Olympic. I used a 12″ (30.5 cm) pillow form, but you could stuff the pillowcase with fiber filling instead. Add the Oceanic Chevron Pillow to your Ravelry queue or favorites here.

There are almost 30 other designs in this issue, but I’ve picked out three favorites.

Pineapple Lace Wrap, crochet pattern by Kristen TenDyke, in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.

Pineapple Lace Wrap, crochet pattern by Kristen TenDyke in the February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.

Fantasic Plum Colorwork Set, crochet pattern by Sarah Jane, in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.

Fantasic Plum Colorwork Set, crochet pattern by Sarah Jane, in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet. You can read my interview with Sarah Jane here.

Snow Blossom Shawl, crochet pattern by Laura Krzak, in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.

Snow Blossom Shawl, crochet pattern by Laura Krzak, in February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet.

You can find the table of contents for the February, 2016 issue of I Like Crochet here, or subscribe to the digital magazine here. Issues are released 6 times a year, and each one is packed with at least 28 patterns as well as tutorials and articles.

2012 Year in Review: Frog Fest!

I’m not the type of crocheter (or knitter) who feels the need to complete every project I start.  Sometimes I start a project for stress relief, other times I make a bad yarn choice, and then there are times when the project just isn’t really something I want to work on anymore.

Today, I’m celebrating all those creations that actually made it as far as into my Ravelry projects but were later unraveled.  While I actually unraveled 12 projects in 2012 (freaky, huh?), I’m just going to talk about the three most significant ones today.

If you followed my second Year of Projects posts, you may remember that I was working on my first pair of knit socks.

I started these during the Ravellenic Games, hoping that would be the push I needed to actually get excited about making knitted socks.  I love looking at other people’s knit socks and I love wearing hand-knit socks, but something about actually knitting socks never seemed all that appealing to me.

I think I’ll stick with crochet socks.  I’m not all that comfortable knitting with small needles or with lightweight yarn and I just don’t feel committed to spending the amount of time needed to knit a single pair of socks.

Another learning experience was the slip stitch scarf I started for the Red Scarf Project.  Vashti Braha‘s newsletters got me very excited about using more slip stitches in my projects.  Unfortunately, I didn’t really think this one through.

Let’s just say that the combination of not so great quality acrylic yarn, watching a movie while crocheting, and slip stitches is not a good one.  I decided to unravel this, along with a Christmas stocking I made last year (in red wool)…

…and give slip stitch crochet another try in wool in 2013.

 

I think the addition of this hook I found at a shop near my job, which looks like a pjoning hook, will also help to make the stitches more even.

And finally, there’s the Pineapple Doily Shawl I started.

Several students in my crochet class were working on it, and I decided to start one, too.  I don’t usually work on projects with my students (besides a little swatch I make in class), and this experience hasn’t encouraged me to make it a habit.

I inherited this yarn from my grandmother and I eventually want to make it into something special for my mom.  So far, the perfect project for this yarn hasn’t revealed itself.

 

Do you unravel projects, do you always finish what you start, or do you abandon projects that aren’t working out?