Tag Archives: weaving

Hispanic Heritage Month 2013 Interview Series: Daniela Montelongo from Pompon’s Party

Today, I’m pleased to interview Daniela Montelongo.  She’s an architect and crafter that lives between Ciudad Juarez, Mexico and El Paso, Texas. Her company, Pompon’s Party, is now her full time job.  Daniela sells crochet and knit accessories and kits for a variety of craft projects through her Etsy shop, and also teaches classes.
You can also find Daniela online on the Pompon’s Party blog, Instagram, Tumblr, Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter.  All photos are copyright Daniela Montelongo/Pompon’s Party and are used with permission.
Daniela Montelongo.

 

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you learn to crochet, knit, and loom knit?
Daniela: I started crocheting when I was 8 years old.  One day, I told my mom to buy me a crochet hook and a ball of yarn.  Then I asked an aunt to teach me because no one in my family knew [how to crochet]. From there I started to crochet, knit and loom (self-taught).  Recently I traveled to Chile to take weaving courses that helped me understand things better.

The Pompon's Party table at a craft fair.

UC: What inspired you to start selling your crafts on Etsy?
Daniela: I started with my shop in 2004, selling at fairs in my city, but it wasn’t until 2010 that I decided to open my Etsy shop.  I wanted to branch out and sell my products around the world.  It was certainly one of the best decisions.

A Pompon's Party crafts workshop.

UC: In addition to your handcrafted items, you sell a lot of kits.  Tell me about your decision to sell kits.
Daniela: Yes, my little shop has grown every year.  When my shop was 8 years old (and two years old on Etsy), I decided to give workshops of things that I love to do.  I found it important to be able to contribute a little with the craft scene and began to teach techniques that I love and I practice for my accessories.
The people outside of my city began to asking me on the blog for the materials that I used in my workshops, so that’s why I decided to also sell the kits online, so they can learn too.

Participants at a Pompon's Party crafts workshop.

UC: You’ve had success in selling your kits and handmade items on Etsy. What tips do you have for a new Etsy seller?
Daniela: The most important thing is to believe in your product.  The rest just flows.
In terms of design,  I think you need to be very careful about the images you upload to your store.  You must describe and show your product the best you can for the customer to fall in love with it since the moment he sees it on the screen.

A crocheted Peter Pan collar by Pompon's Party.  (Click picture to link to Etsy listing.)

UC: Your company started out in Ciudad Juarez and now you’re in El Paso.  What are the yarn crafting scenes like in these two cities?
Daniela: In Mexico, there are very few young creative projects with wool.  Usually in both cities the yarn crafty scene focuses on adults and often their ideas are a little more conservative. However, there is a scene that buys crocheted and knitted projects, and that is a good sign.
It’s about taste.  Definitely in Mexico, people prefer more color than in America, but in America, people prefer more design.

A rectangular loom knitting kit from Pompon's Party.  (Click picture to link to Etsy listing.)

UC: Does your cultural background influence your crafting? If so, how?
Daniela: Definitely.  (The city) I live in is more Americanized.  However, when I came to study architecture in college, I had some teachers who made ​​me love my country. I started to read more about their native culture, customs, etc.
Definitely, I live on the border, and here we don’t have much influence from our roots and our culture. There is no Mexican culture that we all know, and that’s why I try to capture in my accessories all of the color that I would like to come to my city, to bring the beauty of Mexico for people to fall in love with.

Pompon's Party Best Neckwarmer Ever, also known as an Infinity Bohemian Scarf.  (Click picture to link to Etsy listing.)

UC: Do you have any favorite Spanish or English language crochet, knitting, or craft blogs to share?
Daniela: Sure, my favorite blogs are:

 

Thanks so much for stopping by, Daniela!  We wish you continued success.

The next interview in the series will be posted on September 30 with Ruth Garcia-Alcantud/rock+purl.

Interview with Virginia Scholomiti from Yellowfarm

While at Vogue Knitting Live in January, I was introduced to a local, New York State Capital region yarn vendor, Yellowfarm.  The Yellowfarm booth had an interesting display featuring “long locks” art yarns.  The display really highlighted the beautiful fiber from Yellowfarm’s longwool Wensleydale and Teeswater sheep.

Dyed long locks on display in the Yellowfarm booth at Vogue Knitting Live.
Dyed long locks on display in the Yellowfarm booth at Vogue Knitting Live.

Today, I’m interviewing Virginia Scholomiti from Yellowfarm.  You can find Yellowfarm on their website, Etsy, and Facebook.  All farm pictures are (c) Yellowfarm and are used with permission.

 

Yellowfarm, Delanson, NY.
Yellowfarm, Delanson, NY.

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you get started with yarn crafts?

Virginia: I started knitting as a child.  My mother and grandmother both knit, and of course I wanted to be just like them. I was never a very good knitter, but always enjoyed the process. Later on I learned to crochet, but just the basics. It wasn’t until I was much older that I really delved into fiber arts.

I love to knit, and somehow seem to go through periods of no knitting, and then I reacquaint myself with my needles, and really enjoy remembering how much I love the process. Right now I am playing with some Wensleydale lace weight yarn and working on a lace shawl. I have done some weaving on a triangle loom, but never attempted the real thing with all its intricacies. That is something that I have on my list of things I want to spend some time learning.

I also find freeform crochet extremely appealing, and hope to be able to concentrate on learning more crochet stitches and techniques to perhaps enable me to play with that too!

Yellowfarm sheep closeup

UC: Tell us about how you became involved with Yellowfarm.

Virginia: Well, our two girls were grown and we decided to look around to see if we could find an older property that would offer us the country lifestyle we have always yearned for.  We saw this farm and fell in love with it.  It has served us well so far. Both our mothers came here to live out their last years on the farm and now we have two granddaughters that relish coming to visit the farm.

Yellowfarm double sheep closeup

UC: Some of us urban dwellers have fantasies about moving out to the country and starting a farm.  Can you tell us a bit about the realities of farm living and working (the good and the bad)?

Virginia: My husband grew up in the Bronx, and I grew up outside of New York City.  My first career was riding and teaching hunter seat equitation, show hunters and jumpers. I have worked on farms and managed stables just about all of my life, but never owned one.

A kit project on display in the Yellowfarm booth at Vogue Knitting Live.
A kit project on display in the Yellowfarm booth at Vogue Knitting Live.

 

You are absolutely right about the plusses and the minuses involved. Once you involve yourself with keeping animals on your property, you assume a responsibility that must never fail. No days off, no skipping work, or heading off on a spur of the moment whim. There are animals that need you to feed, water, check for any health issues, administer medications, treat wounds, give shots, or call a vet if the situation warrants. Not to mention the physical necessities of farm life: the fences that need fixing, the fields that need tending, manure that needs spreading. There is ALWAYS a list of things that you just can’t quite finish that are waiting for you to do.

 

The flip side is that you get to watch lambs being born and help them to stand and nurse for the first time, see stars that you didn’t know were there, and appreciate the seasons with the amazing changes they bring to the farm.

Yellowfarm Stanley

 

UC: Yellowfarm raises American Wensleydale and Teeswater luster longwool sheep.Can you tell us a bit about the yarn properties from each of these animals?

Virginia: The Wensleydale and Teeswater sheep produce long lustrous ringlets of fiber. The breeds are quite similar and stem from the same long wool lines as the Lester Longwool and Cotswold breeds. What distinguishes their fiber is the silky handle, the intense sheen and the fabulous curl. We are breeding both as we have yet to discern which fiber is superior. If processed in a traditional way, the fiber results in a strong, silky yarn. Worsted yarns have an incredible drape, and a bit of a halo. Hand spinners adore these fleeces as they can be used to create amazing textured art yarns. The longer locks from animals allowed to grow for a longer period are perfect for tailspining. The integrity of the lock is incredibly unique.

Yellowfarm Gunner closeup

UC: One of the things that struck me about your booth at Vogue Knitting Live was your “yarn locks” art yarn. Can you tell us about the difference between your standard and art yarn?  What are the processes they go through?

Virginia: More traditional yarns start with raw fiber that is then washed, picked (fluffed to open the locks and allow vegetable matter to drop out), carded (or combed), and spun by hand (or commercially at a mill) into strands which are then plied together to form various weights of yarns. This is what you are used to seeing as a skein of yarn. In this form of processing the fibers have been made smooth, and lie next to each other forming a uniform strand.

Yellowfarm locks closeup

Art yarns and textured yarns are hand spun yarns. They allow the spinner to create unique and individual yarns with all varieties of textures and colors using an array of techniques. The yarn may be spun directly from the lock of wool in a way that retains the characteristics of those amazing fibers. It also can be lightly carded with a wide range of add ins that give special texture and glitz to the finished yarn. Each skein is completely individual and a reflection of the spinners imagination and spinning prowess.  A work of art.

From the Yellowfarm display at Vogue Knitting Live.
From the Yellowfarm display at Vogue Knitting Live.

UC: Where else can people buy your yarns and meet with Yellowfarm?

Virginia: I sell online via Etsy, but to be truthful, don’t get a chance to update very often. We are highlighting the luster long wool sheep, the Teeswater in particular, at STITCHES East this fall. NYS Sheep and Wool is the granddaddy of fiber festivals in the East. We bring sheep to show there, and are unable to also man a booth. We always welcome people to come up to the sheep barn and say hello, and see where their fiber comes from!

 

Thanks so much for stopping by, Virginia!

 

Hispanic Heritage Month 2012 Interview Series: Charles Voth a.k.a. Stitch Stud

This post is part of my 2012 Hispanic Heritage Month interview series.

I’m really excited to interview Charles Voth, also known as Stitch Stud, today.  Charles is a crochet and knitting designer and tech editor.  (If you’re not sure what a tech editor is, you may want to check out this interview with Juanita Quinones.  And if you get really excited about tech editing, you may want to sign up for these upcoming tech editing classes Charles is teaching at online at Crochet Insider.)  Charles is an active participant in several online forums for crochet designers, and over the years I’ve seen him generously sharing his knowledge with more junior designers (including me!).  In the past year, I’ve had the great pleasure of getting to (virtually) meet Charles when he tech edited one of my patterns.

You can find Charles online at his website, Charles Voth Designs, on Ravelry (as StitchStud and on his designer page), and on Twitter.  All photos are used with permission.

Charles Voth.

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you learn to crochet and knit?

Charles: When I was 5, a woman visiting my mother was crocheting a blue hat. I was fascinated with the movement of her hands and that a 3-d object was appearing from a piece of yarn. I asked her to teach me. She taught me to finger chain that day, and came back another time to teach me how to use a hook. What I made after with the basic stitches I learned, I can’t recall.

 

I remember making a doily in thread following a pattern when I was 8 or 9. I had no-one to help me crack the code of pattern text and abbreviations, but somehow with the photo and the index of stitches I figured it out. When I was 10 or 11, I saw some Guambiano tribesmen knitting and spinning with drop-spindles (in Popayan, Colombia) and I asked my dad what they were doing. He explained what it was and I asked him if I could learn to knit. Fortunately, my grade 5 teacher was a knitter and my dad asked her to teach me. He bought me my first yarn and needles.

 

I am a “thrower”, and faster at it than at “picking”, but when my Russian-born grandmother saw me throwing upon my visit with her in Canada, she was dismayed, and tried to get me to knit Russian-continental. Which I can now do fairly well, but at that age, I found it hopeless to change over.

 

UC: What inspired you to start designing?

Charles: The yarn store I frequented in Medellin, Colombia only had yarn, no pattern booklets. The women would sketch a schematic, do a swatch, and figure out the sweater. They taught me how to do that so I could make my mom a sweater and a vest. But I wanted to knit something for myself. Fortunately, another expat woman lent me an English pattern book with women’s patterns. I analysed the shaping, schematic, gauge, etc, and with the help of my math teacher I designed a men’s sweater based on the woman’s pattern, making it more masculine. I even got a home-ec credit for that. I just kept going from there and only stopped during the first 10 years of my kids’ lives. I was the full-time stay at home parent for half of those years and just didn’t have time.

 

Joni Kimono by Charles Voth, published in Inside Crochet, Issue 33. Photo (c) Inside Crochet 2012 via Ravelry.com.

UC: Many of your patterns are available in both English and Spanish.  Tell us about your decision to offer your patterns in both languages.  Are Spanish language patterns universally understand by Spanish speakers, or is there a great divide like we see between U.S. & U.K. terminology?  If so, how do you address that in your work.

Charles: I wish I could spend more time writing my patterns in both languages. I know that Spanish-speaking knitters and crocheters don’t cling to patterns the way English-speakers do…and seem to thrive on the “swatch, and follow a schematic” formula, but there are many learners and intermediate crocheters who perhaps haven’t benefited from a relative who could teach them the intricacies of shaping, etc, and they do look for patterns. The many Spanish groups of Ravelry who translate with designers’ permission are a testimony to this growing need.

 

While there are differences in the names of stitches, for knitting needles, the crochet hook, and even yarn, the labels do seem immaterial to Spanish-speaking crafters. Rather than stigmatizing one set of labels as incorrect or inferior, each geographic region is happy to use what they know and even to borrow from each other. It’s rather refreshing. The other mentality that I enjoy and return to often for a breath of fresh air, is that there is no knit-crochet dichotomy like in North America. In Colombia, as in many other countries, the word “tejer” is universal for “weaving, knitting, and crochet” and the tool that is used is given when the activity is being described.  So I would “weave with a loom,” “weave with 2 needles,” or “weave with a hook,” for example. I use the words that I was taught in Colombia and the terms and abbreviations I first found when I found other Hispanic  bloggers and stitchers online.

 

UC: In addition to your crochet life, you’re also an ESL teacher.  Does your teaching experience impact your design or pattern writing process, and if so, how?

Charles: Second language learners struggle constantly with accuracy and fluency, and the two aspects of language compete with each other. Either one can talk with native-like speed and tone yet have many embedded grammatical or micro-level pronunciation errors, or one can speak/write accurately, with near perfect grammar and spelling, but it takes forever and the speech is robotic and the writing painfully slow.

 

Crocheters and knitters, depending on their exposure to patterns and the time they’ve been stitching, and what kind of support they’ve had, and more importantly, what kind of learner they are (visual, aural, kinesthetic, text-biased) often struggle with the same fits and false starts when they encounter pattern instructions and charts until they are more experienced, but if a stitcher works faster than they are ready to, things get missed and frogging is more common.

 

I have written patterns that bore the experienced knitter/crocheter to tears because they are full of pedagogical text, and I’ve written patterns that are so sparse that a newbie takes up hours of my time on Ravelry giving pattern support. I’m a visual learner, so I’m fine with a chart, a schematic and minimal text, yet I know that if my patterns were only like that I’d loose 75% of stitchers out there, so I now try to find a happy medium.

 

Crantini Sophisticate by Charles Voth, published on the Annie's website. Photo (c) Annie's 2010.

UC: You were born and raised in Colombia.  What was the yarn crafts scene like there when you were growing up?

Charles: From what I recall, different tribes of pre-European Colombians have a vibrant craft movement and the lore is well documented and perpetuated. Colombia is the textile centre of Latin America, and Medellin, where I grew up, has many textile corporations. The tallest sky scraper in the city is actually a stylized sewing needle. When I was there, mostly grandmothers were the knitters and depending on the social class, younger women either learned out of necessity (to make blankets and clothes for themselves and/or for sale) or if they were middle or upper class, they just dabbled in it once in a while. I’m not at all in touch with the current knitting/crochet culture in Colombia. Colombians on Ravelry appear to come from all age groups.

 

When I lived there, the main yarn purveyors were the French company Pinguoin, and Cisne yarns (from Chile), and I believe Coats had and still has a line of yarn with Spanish labels. These yarns were in the store at the mall near my house. The yarns were mostly acrylic. My favourite store was a different one, 15 blocks from my house and it was frequented mostly by little grandmothers from working class families. The store consisted of a small room with walls made of cinderblock and red-clay brick; it was poorly lit, and had a very sparse non-yarn décor. But it had wall-to-wall cones of what now would be deemed lace-weight acrylic yarn in about 100 colours. I would go there, ask for 15, 23, 60, or any number of grams of yarn, and I could specify the number of strands they would hold together and wind off into cakes. 4 yarns together worked great on my 3.5mm or 4mm needles, so it must have been somewhere been a sport or DK weight.  I’d ask for 3 strands together to make baby booties and 6 strands together to work at a worsted weight gauge. It was VERY splitty, naturally, but I think my getting control of this was what really helped me develop a very even tension.  (UC comment: This sounds like a really fun store!)

 

Mock Cable Men's Pullover by Charles Voth.

UC: Does your cultural background influence your crafting?  If so, how?

Charles: The deepest influence my cultural heritage gives me is my sense of colour and of proportion. I know it’s nothing unusual now, but when I first arrived in Canada and made things with orange, fuschia, and red right beside each other, I sure got looks. Naturally, when I discovered Kaffe Fasset at 19 and saw that colours transcended culture, I feel liberated.

 

I don’t know whether I can say this here, but as a teenage boy interested in the local beauties, I was drawn to girls that had curves, naturally, but it was the relative proportion that mattered. The guys and I would comment on how North American models were twiggy and sickly and we were never surprised that Miss Universe was often won by a South American beauty queen. To be beautiful in our eyes, a girl had to have calves and thighs, but it was just as important to have narrow ankles and knees, and so on—proportion was key. This definitely has influenced my design aesthetic, when designing women’s garments, because I like to accentuate curves and relative differences in proportion rather than create the baggy box or the wraith-like sack-on-a-scare-crow look. You could say that my muse for women’s designs is “la belleza latina.”  Of course, for men’s designs, I now consult my 2 teenage sons and what they and their friends would wear.

 

UC: You’ve held a lot of roles in the yarn industry, including designer, podcaster, tech editor, and magazine editor.  What advice do you have for aspiring professionals?

Charles: I would say,

  • “Don’t ever think you’re too young to start, or too old to start.
  • Don’t give up, take small steps, be humble amongst the great talent that’s around you, but don’t hide your skills and art out of sight.
  • Embrace technology.
  • Don’t have a sense of entitlement, accept rejection without tears.  A rejected design only means your creation doesn’t fit in someone else’s big picture creative concept; it doesn’t mean it’s a terrible design.
  • Act professionally, and as much as you can, don’t let emotions cloud business matters, particularly in public.
  • Befriend many, but give to many in return.
  • Find one or two trustworthy and extremely honest (even painfully so, sometimes) mentors to guide you and to listen to your emotional venting privately.
  • Most of all, enjoy creating, have a knitting or crochet project that doesn’t have a deadline, and is just there to be savoured, touched, and to fill the senses.
  • If you have a life-partner, engage in, and support his/her passion without expecting the same in return.
  • Lastly, be a life-long learner.”
All in One Cardi by Charles Voth.

UC: Do you have any favorite Spanish or English language crochet or craft blogs to share?

Charles:

 

UC: What are you working on right now?

Charles: I’m busy tech-editing mostly. A few designs in the works, but nothing I can talk about at the moment.  (UC comment: And if you’re interested in becoming a tech editor, don’t forget to sign up for Charles’s upcoming classes at Crochet Insider!)

 

Thank you, Charles, for sharing your thoughts with us, and for giving some great advice!

I’m  blogging daily throughout October.  Visit I Saw You Dancing for more Blogtoberfest bloggers and CurlyPops for Blogtoberfest giveaways.  Search #blogtoberfest12 on Twitter.

Interview with Vivian Osborne from Arctic Qiviut Yarns

Way back in January, I had the pleasure of meeting Vivian Osborne  in real life at Vogue Knitting Live.  As the President of Arctic Qiviut Yarns, she was busy selling in the marketplace, so I contacted her for an email interview later.  (And if you’re new to qiviut, as I was, Vivian’s website tell us that it is pronounced “kiv-ee-ute.”)

Vivian Osborne at the Arctic Qiviut booth at a trade show.

Underground Crafter (UC): What are your personal favorite fiber crafts? How did you get started with these crafts?
Vivian: I admire all fiber crafts. Two of my grandmothers taught me to crochet. As a teenager, I crocheted show horse blankets and braid reins. I set up shop at horse shows and made a bundle. My focus now is to create beautiful luxurious yarn out of the downy underwool of the Arctic Muskox – “qiviut.” It’s such a soft, exotic fiber that’s perfect for heirloom creations.

UC: What inspired you to make yarn out of the underwool of a musk ox?
Vivian: I was running my nonprofit organization, Just For Kids, Inc., as part of the Choosing A Safe Camp For Your Child Program.  Someone donated one pound of raw qiviut fiber, stinky and complete with guard hair and vegetation, and matted in a sheet.  It was an absolute mess.  Some local Boy Scouts helped me, and we spent a year hand cleaning the raw musk ox fiber.  I learned how to use a drop spindle at the local guild.  It just grew from there.  (UC comment: Wow, that is some start!  It makes me want to learn to use my drop spindle even more, just in case I unexpectedly receive some awesome, mystery fiber!)

Vivian cleaning those guard hairs, about 12 years ago.

UC: You’ve had the opportunity to visit various fiber events to promote Arctic Qiviut Yarns. Tell us about some of your favorite experiences at these events.
Vivian: My first event was the NW Needle Market wholesale show in Seattle. Everyone was so excited about what I had to offer. They liked that I’m from North Pole, Alaska; that I use the underwool of the arctic musk ox to make 100% qiviut yarn and 5 exclusive qiviut yarn blends; that my yarn has a beautiful twist; and that it is available in 28 incredible hand dyed and hand painted colors. I have also exhibited my yarn at TNNA wholesale tradeshows in Long Beach and Columbus,  Knitters Connection, and at Vogue Knitting Live in New York. People love learning about qiviut. Vogue Knitting Live was fun because I met the knitters, crocheters, and weavers. They truly enjoy touching the yarn and seeing all the colors. They liked meeting the manufacturer – me! They liked that I manufacture something different not found anywhere else in the world. My qiviut sock yarn was a hit at all the shows.  (UC comment: As one of the crocheters who was visiting Vivian’s booth at Vogue Knitting Live, I can tell you that the yarn is really amazing to feel and that people did respond very well to the colors!)

UC: Not many crocheters and knitters are familiar with qiviut fiber. What are some of the properties of your yarn that you’d like people to know about?
Vivian: Qiviut is truly an amazing fiber. It is the delicate underwool of the Arctic muskox. It is one of the most sought after fibers in the world because of its rarity, softness, and warmth. Qiviut is softer than cashmere and is light as a feather. It’s an insulating fiber and is comfortable to wear in any climate.

Qiviut is the only fiber in the US that is an heirloom fiber that can be treasured for generations. The value goes up over time. Qiviut yarnwear or yarn is a unique gift for yourself or that special person. Only the best delicate underwool of the Arctic muskox is used to produce Arctic Qiviuts’ yarn. We offer 100% qiviut and qiviut blends. We only use the highest grade, finest quality German angora, cashmere, baby alpaca, cultivated Bombay silk, superwash merino, bamboo, and nylon in our blends.

A musk ox.

Muskox is a very old species they have been around since the time of the woolly mammoth. Most live in the Arctic, in Canada, Alaska, and Greenland. Qiviut is not another term for the muskox but refers to the soft, downy undercoat. A mature male produces around 6 to 8 pounds of muskox raw fleece fiber. After processing the raw fleece fiber you will yield about 2 to 3 pounds of cleaned qiviut ready for spinning into yarn. It is one of the lightest and warmest of all the natural fibers. Qiviut feels wonderful next to the skin.

Some of the characteristics and properties of qiviut:

  • It is 8 times warmer than wool,
  • Very light weight,
  • It is comfortable in any climate,
  • It doesn’t shrink, felt, or inch,
  • It is safe for people who suffer from wool allergies,
  • It is softer than cashmere
  • Wild muskox averages from 16.5 microns in yearlings to 18.2 microns in adults,
  • The undyed color is gray-brown, but qiviut dyes easily, and
  • The staple length is 3.5–7 cm (1.5–3 inches).

UC: What are your plans for 2012? Will be you be at any other events?
Vivian: On May 24, I will be meeting and greeting passengers from a knitting cruise ship in Anchorage, Alaska at the Quilted Raven. I’ll be at TNNA from June 21 to 25 in Columbus, Ohio and at the Twisted Thread Knit and Stitch Tradeshow at Alexander Palace in London, England from October 11 to 14.

UC: Is there anything else you’d like to add about Arctic Qiviut?

Vivian: I am the exclusive manufacture of hand dyed and hand painted 100% Qiviut yarn and 5qiviut yarn blends. I only sell my yarns wholesale and at special events like wholesale and retail tradeshows. I also do trunk shows at retail shops that sell my yarns. On my website, you can find a worldwide list of shops that sell my yarn, properties of all fibers used in Arctic Qiviut yarns, more information on qiviut, free patterns including one designed by Alaskan designer, Beverly Shannon, and patterns using 1 skein of Arctic Qiviut yarns that you can purchase directly from the Alaskan designer, Nancy Davidson. On my website you can see all the beautiful hand dyed and hand painted colors of our yarns. Our slogan is “Experience the journey of the qiviut, from the muskox to your fingertips.”

Thanks so much for stopping by for an interview, Vivian, and for sharing so much about the qiviut fiber with us!

 

Credentials, or do I really need that certification? (Part 2: Getting started as a local needlecrafts teacher)

Now you’ve asked yourself some basic questions and you’ve decided you want to teach needlecrafts.  You may be wondering if you should get some sort of certification.

FULL DISCLOSURE ALERT!  I am a Craft Yarn Council (CYC) certified crochet instructor (level I) and certified crochet teacher (level II) and I’m in the process of getting my CYC certification for knitting.

There are several reasons you might get a teaching certification.

  • Some employers require certification. This is particularly true of national chain stores (e.g., Michaels, Joanns).
  • Some organizations prefer certification. While your local yarn shop, continuing education program, or regional needlearts conference probably don’t require you to be certified, having a credential may give you a boost over another interested teacher.  This could be particularly true if you don’t have other credentials in needlecrafts.  If you have other experience or education, the credential may not be as valuable.
  • You aren’t confident about your teaching abilities. Teaching certification programs focus on how to teach the craft.  If you don’t know how to explain things, or why something should be done a certain way, the certification program can help you prepare to teach.
  • Some certification programs provide exposure opportunities for their graduates. For example, the Embroiderer’s Guild of America includes the list of Graduate Certified Teachers on its website with contact information.  If you don’t have your own website or storefront, this extra publicity can help you find students.
  • You need a head start on developing your teaching resources. Many certification programs include materials in their training which you can adapt for use with your students.  Others include tips on publicizing your classes.
  • It just sounds cool. When I tell students about what I had to do to complete my certification, it often puts them at ease and makes them feel more comfortable about taking a class with me.

There are also reasons why you might not get certification.

  • It costs money. These programs are not cheap.  Most teacher certification programs cost at least $100 for a correspondence program.  Attending an on-site program can be very costly if you need to travel to the location.
  • It takes time. On-site programs generally have a minimum number of hours to participate.  Correspondence programs often have many tasks you must complete to show your mastery of the craft.  Many certification programs require you to teach a certain number of hours before granting certification.
  • It isn’t necessary because of your existing experience or education in needlecrafts. ‘Nuff said.
  • There isn’t much competition in your local area, so the certification provides no advantage. I live in New York City, and everyone and their mother wants to teach knitting and crocheting.  But perhaps where you live, you are the only game in town :).

If you do decide to seek certification, what are your options in the needlecrafts?  Here is a list I’ve compiled.  This is based only on a preliminary Google search.  I am not affiliated with any of these programs (other than being a CYC graduate and student as already mentioned).  This is not an endorsement of any of these programs, so don’t be mad at me if you don’t like them :).

Crochet:

Embroidery and Needlepoint:

Knitting:

Patchwork and Quilting:

Rug Hooking:

Sewing:

Another alternative to teaching certification is to become a master (insert needlecraft here).  While these programs do not specifically prepare you to teach, they provide advanced technical training and an assessment of your skills.  This can also be helpful from a “look, I have a cool credential” point of view as well as by providing you with additional skill development.

Some examples:

A less expensive and time consuming option is to buy a book on teaching or a teaching resource package from an existing organization.  This won’t provide the same level of preparation, but can be a great option if you are short on time and are confident in your teaching skills.  Here are some examples:

This list is by no means exhaustive.  I’d be interested in hearing from other teachers about their experiences related to certification.