Book Review: Learn How to English Paper Piece by Carolina Moore

Learn How to English Paper Piece by Carolina Moore book review on Underground Crafter - book cover

Are you looking for an on-the-go sewing project? Do you want to expand your sewing skills? When you’re learning a new technique, do you like step-by-step instructions? Then, you’ll love the latest book from Carolina Moore! Check out today’s post for my review, along with a chance to win a copy of the book and a starter kit of supplies.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. A free review copy of Learn How to English Paper Piece by Carolina Moore was provided to me by Nancy’s Notions. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Book Review

Learn How to English Paper Piece: 10 Start-to-Finish English Paper Piecing Projects and the Techniques to Make Them! is the latest book by Carolina Moore. You may know Carolina as the blogger behind 30 Minute Crafts and Always Expect Moore, or as the co-author of Hot Glue Hacks and Crafts, which I reviewed here. I’m happy to say that I know Carolina in real life, and she’s a woman after my own heart. In addition to all of her creative talents, she’s also smart, assertive, and fun!

Now, that’s fascinating, you’re thinking, but what about the book? Let me tell you a bit about Learn How to English Paper Piece. It starts with an introduction to English paper piecing (also known as EPP), a hand-sewing technique to make shaped pieces for patchwork, applique, and quilting projects. As the name suggests, there is paper involved! The paper backing is removable but provides a structure so that sewists of all skill levels can make shapes like hexagons without learning complicated machine-sewing techniques.

Carolina’s introduction explains that EPP is portable, which makes it ideal for crafters like me who are always on-the-go. She also explains that you can make projects that combine multiple shapes, as long as the sides are the same length. This may seem obvious, but often times when you start a new technique, the “common sense” stuff isn’t all that obvious! The book then moves on to provide an overview of the tools you would use for EPP. Since the fabric needs to be basted to the paper, Carolina shares two basting methods. She also provides written instructions with photos to explain stitching methods for both hexagons and diamonds.

The book then moves on to the projects. I love that Carolina has included projects of different sizes and with different ratios of English paper piecing to machine sewing. Each project includes a list of supplies and written instructions with numerous progress pictures. There is also a large (generally full-page) photograph of each finished project shown in use with measurements. My favorite projects in the book are the Dream Catchers, which look like an amazing way to use up fabric scraps while getting near instant project gratification…

Learn How to English Paper Piece by Carolina Moore book review on Underground Crafter - Dream Catchers

the Diamond Tote, which is just sooooo pretty…

Learn How to English Paper Piece by Carolina Moore book review on Underground Crafter - Diamond Tote

and the Hexi Placemats, which would make a great gift.

Learn How to English Paper Piece by Carolina Moore book review on Underground Crafter - Hexi Placemats

Other projects include a pillow, two pouches, coasters, a mason jar cozy, a pillowcase dress, and a quilt.

Learn How to English Paper Piece by Carolina Moore book review on Underground Crafter - project list

Although the book does have lots of photographs and helpful instructions, it isn’t there to teach you how to sew or how to use your sewing machine. All of the projects in the book are finished with machine sewing and it’s assumed that readers know the basics. The book is compact but it’s also affordably priced at $9.99. I reviewed a PDF version of the book, but it’s available as a softcover exclusively on Nancy’s Notions here.

I will mention that while the book makes it seem completely attainable to do your own English paper piecing projects, the idea of cutting out lots of precise little hexagons and diamonds is a bit daunting. Of course, if you have a Cricut or another cutting machine, you can use that to cut out each piece. But, you’ll be glad to know that Nancy’s Notions also sells a Learn How to English Paper Piece Starter Set that includes the book along with 400 pre-cut hexagons (in two different sizes), fabric glue for basting, scissors, starch, and thread.

I recommend Learn How to English Paper Piece: 10 Start-to-Finish English Paper Piecing Projects and the Techniques to Make Them! for any sewist that is looking to expand skills, find project inspiration, or sew while on-the-go.

Would you like to find out more about the book? Check out the rest of the posts on the Learn How to English Paper Piece blog tour.

Giveaway

Now that you’ve read my review of Learn How to English Paper Piece: 10 Start-to-Finish English Paper Piecing Projects and the Techniques to Make Them! by Carolina Moore, I’m guessing you’re ready to get your hands on the book. Well, the nice folks at Nancy’s Notions have set aside a Learn How to English Paper Piece Starter Set for one lucky winner!
This giveaway is happening on Instagram and you can find all the details about how to enter in the embedded post below (or here, if it isn’t loading). Enter by midnight Eastern on Saturday, February 9, 2019. Good luck!

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Do you EPP? Do you want to learn how? … If you answered “YES!” to either of those questions, then I have the perfect giveaway for you! To celebrate the launch of my new book “Learn How to English Paper Piece” that has been published with @NancysNotions, we’re giving away everything you need to learn how to English Paper Piece (my book and all the items pictured)! To enter to win, make sure you are following each of the accounts listed below, then leave a comment. A comment on each account is an individual entry. For additional entries, you can leave a second comment on each account with a different quilty friend who might want to win! Winner will be selected Saturday, February 9th at Midnight, EST and has 24 hours after being contacted to respond. Good Luck! @craftmoore @poweredbyquilting @twomakerchicks @homecraftsbyali @phatquarters @snowydaysquilting @charmedlifequilting @swoodsonsays @linda_bratten .. .. Per Instagram rules, this promotion is in no way sponsored, administered, or associated with Instagram, Inc. By entering, entrants confirm that they are 13+ years of age, release Instagram of responsibility, and agree to Instagram’s terms of use. #quilt #epp #englishpaperpiecing #giveaway #quilter #handsewing #isew #ilovetosew

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Book Review: Yarn Pooling Made Easy by Marly Bird

Book review: Yarn Pooling by Marly Bird via Underground CrafterI’m so excited to be part of Marly Bird’s blog tour for her latest pattern booklet, which will help you explore planned color pooling in crochet. If you’ve ever wondered how to control those pools of color your variegated yarn makes when you’re crocheting, you may have found your book. Oh, and did I mention the giveaway? Yeah, there’s one of those, too, so read on for details.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. A free review copy of Yarn Pooling Made Easy was provided to me by Leisure Arts. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Book Review

Book review: Yarn Pooling Made Easy by Marly Bird via Underground Crafter

Many crocheters (and knitters) already know Marly Bird as a designer, the National Spokesperson for Red Heart Yarns, and/or as the host of the Yarn Thing Podcast. She’s also a teacher on Craftsy and Creativebug, and, of course, an author.


Marly’s latest is Yarn Pooling Made Easy, a crochet pattern booklet focused on creating argyle patterns using planned color pooling with variegated yarns. The booklet opens with a brief introduction and a link to Marly’s blog section on planned pooling. (She also has a YouTube playlist with all of her planned pooling videos.) It continues on to providing some planned pooling tips and a biography of Marly.

The booklet then moves right into the patterns. There are 10 patterns in total, including 4 scarves/cowls, 3 women’s accessories, 2 baby/child wearables, and a car seat blanket. All of the patterns are rated as easy and use medium weight yarns from Red Heart. Each pattern includes the finished size, a shopping (materials) list, gauge information (including tips for creating a gauge swatch), a stitch guide, and detailed instructions using U.S. pattern abbreviations. Each pattern includes at least one large photograph (on a model or in use), but most include several pictures.

The booklet ends with a General Instructions section that includes yarn and hook size information, a comparison of U.S. to U.K./international abbreviations, a glossary of abbreviations and symbols, information about gauge, instructions for joining with single crochet, and written and illustrated instructions for the magic ring and reverse single crochet. The book ends with Yarn Information that provides details on the yarn used in each project.

Yarn Pooling Made Easy is a paperback pattern booklet that lays flat so you can read and crochet at the same time. Like all pattern booklets, you will enjoy the book more if you want to make the included patterns. The patterns aren’t posted to Ravelry yet, but you can see them in a series of videos on Marly’s YouTube channel. My favorite patterns are the Wristers, Cowl, & Hat Set…

…and the Poncho with Raglan Yoke.

If you’re interested in planned color pooling and you like the patterns you see on Marly’s YouTube channel, check out Yarn Pooling Made Easy!

Giveaway

Book review: Yarn Pooling Made Easy by Marly Bird via Underground Crafter | Enter through September 25, 2017 for your chance to win a copy, courtesy of Leisure Arts!Now that you’ve read my review, are you ready to get your hands on a copy of Yarn Pooling Made Easy? The nice folks at Leisure Arts have set aside a copy for one reader.

This giveaway is open to readers worldwide, except where prohibited by law. Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Monday, September 25, 2017. One winner will be chosen at random from the entries submitted via the Rafflecopter widget. The winner will receive Yarn Pooling Made Easy by Marly Bird, courtesy of Leisure Arts. Winners will U.S. mailing addresses will receive a print copy. International winners will receive an electronic book. Good luck!

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Visit the Other Stops on the Blog Tour!

Be sure to check out the previous stops on the blog tour. Many are also offering giveaways for the book so you can increase your chances of winning. Also, don’t forget to stop by Marly’s YouTube channel, where she will be hosting a giveaway throughout the blog tour where you can win the Red Heart yarn to make different projects from the booklet.

 

Book Review: Emoji Crochet by Charles Voth

I’m sharing a review of a new crochet pattern book from Charles Voth, along with a giveaway for your chance to win a copy, so read on for details! I first “met” Charles back in 2011 when he tech edited one of my first published crochet patterns, Quadrilateral: A broomstick lace shawl. (It’s now available as a free blog pattern and broomstick lace tutorial here.) Charles was also one of the first people to be interviewed in my Hispanic Heritage Month series, back in 2012. In all of these years, we’ve never met in person, but it has been great to get to know Charles as a crochet and knitting designer, tech editor, and author.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. A free review copy of Emoji Crochet: 20 Easy-to-Make Projects Expressing Attitude & Style was provided to me by Spring House Press. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Book Review

Book review: Emoji Crochet: 20 Easy-to-Make Projects Expressing Attitude & Style by Charles Voth via Underground Crafter

Emoji Crochet: 20 Easy-to-Make Projects Expressing Attitude & Style by Charles Voth is a crochet pattern collection filled with tips and tricks for customizing your crochet with emojis. It opens with Acknowledgements by Charles and then moves into a visual Table of Contents with thumbnails of the patterns included in the book.

Crochet Stitches and Techniques includes written and illustrated instructions for the slip knot, yarn over, six basic crochet stitches (chain, slip stitch, single crochet, half double crochet, double crochet, and treble crochet), post stitches, decreases, and special stitches. It also explains how to crochet in the front, back, and under both loops; how to work flat in rows and in the round; how to crochet into the foundation chain and the adjustable ring; the difference between the right and wrong side; tips for changing colors; and how to work several seams, joins, finishes, and decorative stitches.

Adding Faces to Your Projects includes 36 patterns for crocheted features. Each pattern includes a close up photo of the expression and a written pattern using U.S. abbreviations. There are also tips for making embroidered and pom pom facial expressions, as well as tips for crocheting faces using charts (with reference to charted facial expressions later in the book).

The book then moves into the patterns, which are arranged by type. There are six home decor patterns (including pillows, blankets, and an ottoman cover), eight clothing and wearable accessories patterns (including hats, slippers, mittens, a hoodie, a scarf, and a bib), and five accessories patterns (including cases and bags, earrings, a washcloth, and a hacky sack). Each of the patterns includes a description, finished measurements, gauge information, and materials, including the yarn weight symbol. Patterns with crocheted emojis also include a Facial Features Directory that explains which elements are used from Adding Facing to Your Projects. There are 31 emoji charts (in addition to the 36 crocheted emoji patterns) as well as blank charts with just a face for every pattern that uses charts. These charts and the features from Adding Faces to Your Projects allow you to customize the emojis for each project included in the book, and, of course, help you to customize other projects to add characters. The patterns include multiple project photos and charted emojis typically include charts and a photo of the completed emoji.

Project Colors provides details on the yarn used for each project, including brand and color. Resources includes a U.S. crochet pattern abbreviation key and information about yarn weights and hook sizes. The book ends with two blank grids that can be used to make your own picture charts, along with tips for doing so.

Like all paperbacks, it doesn’t lay flat easily so it will be difficult to crochet while reading. While the patterns don’t include difficulty levels, each pattern is clearly divided up into sections and most use simple stitches.

Emoji Crochet: 20 Easy-to-Make Projects Expressing Attitude & Style is more than a pattern book. While there are (as advertised in the title) 20 projects, there are actually over 50 facial expressions (including crocheted features and charted emojis) that can be used to customize other projects. Charles is a great teacher, and you will get some great tips about adding character to your projects from reading his suggestions. If you love emojis, or want to crochet for kids or teens who do, you’ll find a lot of inspiration in this book.

Giveaway

Book review: Emoji Crochet: 20 Easy-to-Make Projects Expressing Attitude & Style by Charles Voth via Underground Crafter | Enter through September 21, 2017 for your chance to win a copy, courtesy of Spring House Press.

I hope my review has you excited about getting your hands on Emoji Crochet: 20 Easy-to-Make Projects Expressing Attitude & Style. The folks at Spring House Press were nice enough to put aside a copy for one lucky winner!

This giveaway is open to readers in the U.S. and Canada, except where prohibited by law. Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Thursday, September 21, 2017. One winner will be chosen at random from the entries submitted via the Rafflecopter widget. The winner will receive 1 copy of Emoji Crochet: 20 Easy-to-Make Projects Expressing Attitude & Style by Charles Voth, courtesy of Spring House Press. Good luck!

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Every Which Way Crochet Borders by Edie Eckman: Book Review with Excerpted Pattern (Border #32)

Every Which Way Crochet Borders: 139 Patterns for Customized Edgings by Edie Eckman | Book review, excerpted pattern (Border #32), and giveaway on Underground CrafterI’m excited to share a crochet book review with a giveaway today as part of a blog tour. I’ve also included an excerpted pattern, so read on for details!

This post contains affiliate links. A free review copy of Every Which Way Crochet Borders was provided to me by Storey Publishing. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Book Review

Back in January, I had the opportunity to meet one of my crochet (and knitting) heroes, Edie Eckman, in person at Creativation. (I always forget to take pictures in moments like these, so you’ll have to trust me on this one!) I have several, well-loved books by Edie in my crochet library, including two of my favorite crochet books ever, Beyond the Square Crochet Motifs (reviewed here in my roundup of 10 granny square books) and Around the Corner Crochet Borders (reviewed here in my roundup of over 20 crochet stitch guides). When Edie asked if I would be part of the blog tour for her new book, Every Which Way Crochet Borders: 139 Patterns for Customized Edgings, I jumped at the chance. (Even though I’m nerding out, I did review the book thoroughly. Or, is that because I’m nerding out?)

Every Which Way Crochet Borders: 139 Patterns for Customized Edgings by Edie Eckman | Book review, excerpted pattern (Border #32), and giveaway on Underground CrafterEvery Which Way Crochet Borders is kind of a sequel to Around the Corner Crochet Borders, but each book is an independent work so you don’t need both to enjoy the one in hand. You also won’t find it a repeat in terms of the information presented.

If you like to nerd out on crochet, if you dream about what border to add to your project (and then wake up looking for your hook), or if you just wish you had a fabulous crochet teacher at your side to guide you through designing your next project, then Every Which Way Crochet Borders is a great book for you. Edie generously shares her years of crochet knowledge with readers in an understandable way, along with plenty of beautiful border patterns.

The book opens with 30-page section called Design Concepts where Edie shares tips for choosing a border to complement or contrast your project and on color and customization, provides photo tutorials and detailed explanations to help you place borders in crochet fabric (as well as knitted fabric, non-woven fleece, and woven fabrics), walks you through the math of stitch counts (in a very non-scary way, for all of you that are afraid of math), and shares several methods for joining a new yarn and ending rounds. This section includes plenty of detailed, color photographs as well as text and is written in a conversational tone. Edie also provides pattern reading tips at the end of this section.

There is also an 18-page Appendix section with more information about reading pattern abbreviations and international stitch symbols; a table of attributes which helps you choose borders based on width, reversibility, and several other options; thumbnails of each border; and an illustrated glossary of terms and stitches. The book also includes a helpful index.

But what about the patterns? The Border Designs section includes the patterns in no particular order (which is why you may find the table of attributes or thumbnails helpful). Each border includes stitch multiples for the base round and a note about where to begin the border (e.g., “Begin in corner st”), a large color photo of the border (including the corner and two sides) against a white background, and the pattern instructions in both U.S. pattern abbreviations and international stitch symbols. Each pattern also lists the attributes (such as “Narrow” or “Undulating”) that you will find in the table of attributes. Some patterns also include notes, like special stitch patterns.

The book is spiral bound with a hard cover, so you can keep it flat while reading and expect it to stand up to years of use. The border samples are photographed clearly and are in bright and inviting colors.


In her introduction, Going ‘Round the Bend, Edie says:

To encourage browsing, the borders are arranged on the following pages in no particular order. Browsing can pay off in a big way. You may think you want a ruffled edging, but when you see that textured border, you’ll realize it’s just the thing!

I debated with myself about the value of putting the borders in random order. On the one hand, it might have been helpful to have patterns with similar attributes (e.g., “Undulating” or “Straight”) together, and beginners might feel more confident if the patterns were ordered by difficulty. Ultimately, I think Edie’s logic about this actually makes sense. I know that from years of leafing through stitch guides, I don’t always end up using the pattern that I came in search of.

I’m giving this book 5 stars. It includes a lot of helpful information that will improve your crochet skills,  beautiful eye candy, and plenty of great patterns for every type of taste. The border patterns don’t indicate a skill level, but Edie encourages swatching and experimentation at the beginning of the book. Crocheters who have the basic stitches down will find plenty to work with in this book, and more advanced crocheters can dive into more complex border or experiment with design.

Find Join as You Go: Seamless Crochet Techniques and other online classes by Edie Eckman on Craftsy.

Border #32

Crochet Pattern by Edie Eckman

Excerpted from Every Which Way Crochet Borders

© 2017 by Edith L. Eckman. Photography by John Polak. Charts by Karen Manthey. Shared with permission from Storey Publishing.

Every Which Way Crochet Borders: 139 Patterns for Customized Edgings by Edie Eckman | Book review, excerpted pattern (Border #32), and giveaway on Underground Crafter

Stitches & Notes

  • The first two rounds of Border #32 are the same as Border #31, but the third round is more solid and substantial.
  • Picot-3: Ch 3, slip st in third chain from hook.
  • V-st (V-stitch): (Dc, ch 1, dc) in st or space indicated.
  • Pattern attributes: Reversible, Medium, Undulating, Open/Lacy

Pattern Instructions

Every Which Way Crochet Borders: 139 Patterns for Customized Edgings by Edie Eckman | Book review, excerpted pattern (Border #32), and giveaway on Underground Crafter
Click to enlarge chart.

  • Base rnd, each side: Multiple of 6 + 3 + corners.
  • Begin 5 sts to left of corner st.
  • Rnd 1: Ch 1, sc in first st, ch 3, skip 2 sts, *V-st in next st, [ch 3, skip 2 sts, sc in next st, ch 3, skip 2 sts, V-st in next st] to 1 st before corner, ch 3, skip 1 st, sc in corner st, ch 3, skip 1 st; rep from * around, ending last rep V-st in next st, ch 3, skip 2 sts, join with slip st to first sc.
  • Rnd 2: Ch 1, sc in same st, *ch 3, (dc, ch 3, dc) in center of next V-st, ch 3, sc in next sc; rep from * around, omitting last sc, join with slip st to first sc.
  • Rnd 3: Ch 1, sc in same st, *ch 3, skip ch-3 space, (3 dc, picot-3, 3 dc) in next ch-3 space, ch 3, sc in next sc; rep from * around, omitting last sc, join with slip st to first sc. Fasten off.

Giveaway

Every Which Way Crochet Borders: 139 Patterns for Customized Edgings by Edie Eckman | Book review, excerpted pattern (Border #32), and giveaway on Underground CrafterSo now that you’ve read the review and checked out the sample pattern, I’m sure you’d like to get your hands on a copy of Every Which Way Crochet Borders: 139 Patterns for Customized Edgings. The nice folks at Storey Publishing have set aside a copy for one lucky reader!

This giveaway is open to readers with mailing addresses in the United States, except where prohibited by law. Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. One winner will be chosen at random from the entries submitted via the Rafflecopter widget. The winner will receive one copy of Every Which Way Crochet Borders, courtesy of Storey Publishing.

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If you’re looking for other chances to win, follow along with the rest of the blog tour!

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground CrafterThis is a mega post as part of the virtual tour for my new book, Make Money Teaching Crochet. I’m going to be sharing a tutorial for making your very own Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) mug, along with tips for customizing it with your own images using Canva and Pixabay. And, if you’re seeing this on or before Monday, June 27, 2016, you can also enter the giveaway for the book, so read on for details!

This post contains affiliate links. Washi tape for this project was generously provided by Duck Brand.

Start with Your Rebus Design

Did you love rebuses as a kid or did they leave you confused? Honestly, I could never really understand them so I tried to make an easy one for you today!

You can skip ahead to the next section to download the same designs I used on my mug, or read this section where I’ll show you how to customize your own rebus design using Canva and Pixabay.

How To Design Custom Images Using Canva and Pixabay | Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground Crafter

  • To start, you’ll need a free Canva account.
  • Login and on the top right corner, click on “Use Custom Dimensions.”
  • When the measurements pop up, click on “in” (inches) from the drop down menu.
  • I used 3″ x 3″ (7.5 cm x 7.5 cm) for a small mug. This will leave about an inch from the top so your lips don’t touch the drawing. Click on “Design.”
  • A new tab will open up with your design. On the left menu, click on “Elements.”
  • Use the search bar to find images. I searched for “eye” in the example. You will find a mix of free images and premium images (usually $1).
  • When you find an image you like, click on it. It will appear on your custom canvas.
  • Resize and/or reposition the image. Guidelines will appear to help you center the image or position it in line with other images.
  • Continue adding images as you see fit.
  • I didn’t like Canva’s free images for yarn, so I opened Pixabay in another tab and searched for “yarn.”
  • Once you find an image you like on Pixabay, click on it to enlarge.
  • The image will open in a new tab. Click on “Free Download” and enter the captcha code.
  • Return to your Canva project tab. On the left side menu, click on “Uploads.”
  • Click on “Upload your own images” and locate the file you found on Pixabay. (You can use this to add any picture from your computer to your design.)
  • Once the image is uploaded, it will appear in the left menu just under the “Upload your own images” button. Click on the image to add it to your design.
  • As with the other images, position and resize it as desired.
  • To make an alternate version, click on the “2 files” icon to the right of your canvas. (If you hover over the icon, “Copy this page” will be visible.)
  • I clicked on the hearts image and used the “trash” icon popup to delete it.
  • I searched for a different heart image and added it to the duplicate canvas.
  • If you plan to print in black and white instead of color, change the image colors to black and gray to optimize. Click on the image you want to change and a small editing menu bar will pop up.
  • Click on the color you’d like to change and select another color from the drop down menu.
  • Once your design is ready, choose “Download” from the top right menu bar. If you plan to print your design, choose “PDF for Print.”
  • The image(s) will download as a PDF to your computer. Print these out and continue on to the next part of the tutorial.

Make Your Own Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground CrafterSupplies You’ll Need

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground Crafter

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground CrafterInstructions

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground Crafter

  • Apply the rubbing alcohol to the cotton balls or paper towel and clean the mug’s surface.
  • Place the tracing paper over your images and trace the outline. (For best results, tape the printed image to a flat surface using the washi tape first, and then tape the tracing paper over that before starting to trace.)
  • Once you’re satisfied with your tracing, cut the tracing paper into smaller pieces, leaving just a small space around the image so it’s easier to attach to the mug.
  • Use the washi tape to position the tracing paper with the pencil side down touching the mug. Adjust it until you get the position you’d like. (Sharpie recommends leaving about one inch clearance below the rim to avoid tasting marker.)
  • With the pencil, rub over the images being sure to press down hard on lines. This will transfer an outline of your image onto the mug to use as a guide.
  • Use the markers to draw over the outline as you’d like. You can “erase” any mistakes using alcohol and the cotton swab before it dries.
  • Allow the paint to dry. You can set the paint in the over so the mugs retain their color permanently. (Something Turquoise has a tutorial for setting the mugs in the oven.)

Give Your Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug as a Gift!

As I mentioned earlier, this tutorial is part of the virtual tour for my new book, Make Money Teaching Crochet. Besides being a super awesome mug to bring to your next crochet class, it’s also an affordable way to make kits for your students!

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground CrafterFor my kit mug, I used some stash yarn wound into a ball that would fit into the mug and some beginner supplies. I got most of these at the 99 Cents store. The yarn needles and safety pins were in a larger pack that I broke up. The mug was on sale for $1.50 at Michaels.

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground CrafterI attached the yarn needle to the scissor by threading the eye with the safety pin so it wouldn’t get lost.

Eye Heart Yarn (I Love Yarn) Mug Tutorial by Underground CrafterIf you’re using these mugs for a class, be sure to include the cost of the supplies in your teaching fee or sell these as a kit.

Giveaway

Are you or a friend interested in using your passion for crochet to earn some side income? You’ll love my new book, Make Money Teaching Crochet, which shares much of what I’ve learned from teaching crochet locally and regionally for the past 8 years.

You can read more about the book here. Make Money Teaching Crochet is available in three editions to meet your needs.

Enter below for your chance to win a copy for you or a friend. This giveaway is open worldwide. Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Monday, June 27, 2016. One winner will be chosen at random from the entries submitted via the Rafflecopter widget to win one copy of Make Money Teaching Crochet Ultimate Printable Edition.

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Make Money Teaching Crochet Virtual Tour

Follow along with the virtual tour for more chances to win! I’ll update this with links as they go live.