Crochet Pattern: A Little Bit of Bling Shawl

A Little Bit of Bling shawl, free crochet pattern by Underground CrafterLast January, I crocheted some samples for the Kollabora booth at Vogue Knitting Live.

One was this shawl. Kollabora was looking for something that really stood out in the booth, and I held two strands of yarn together – a metallic and a mohair yarn. I’m really excited to be able to share the pattern for A Little Bit of Bling Shawl with you today. It’s a great project for the last days of summer – it’s quick and airy, but the long fringes provide good coverage in case it gets chilly.

A Little Bit of Bling Shawl, free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

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This summer, I spent a great afternoon with my friend Carlota Zimmerman from the Creativity Yenta (interviewed here). In addition to being a contributing blogger for the Huffington Post, she’s a great model! After a trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, we went to Central Park to take some pictures, and Carlota had some great poses wearing this fun and flirty design. (Her tagline isn’t “Just your average sexy force of nature” for nothing!)

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A Little Bit of Bling Shawl, free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

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A Little Bit of Bling Shawl, free crochet pattern by Underground CrafterA Little Bit of Bling Shawl

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

Updated October 4, 2014

02-easy 50 3-light 50 US terms 50This quick and easy triangular shawl makes a great transitional weather accessory. The metallic yarn brightens up any outfit! Adjust the length of the fringe to fit your personal style.

Finished Size: Adjustable. Photographed sample is 50” (127 cm) wingspan length, 13.5” (34 cm) spine length, excluding fringe.

Materials:

  • Galler Yarns Kismet (87% polyester/13% nylon, 8 oz/227 g/1,400 yds/1,280 m) – 1 cone in 901 Silver, or approximately 300 yds (274 m) in any metallic, light weight yarn.
  • Galler Yarns Flore II (75% Kid Mohair/15% Wool/10% Nylon, 1.75 oz/50 g/100 yds/91 m/) – 3 skeins in 1005 Ocean, or approximately 300 yds (274 m) in any light weight mohair blend yarn.
  • L-11/8 mm crochet hook, or any size needed to obtain correct gauge.
  • Yarn needle.

Gauge: 10 fdc = 4” (10 cm) across.  Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern:

  • beg fdc – beginning foundation double crochet – Ch 4, turn, sk 3 sts, yo, insert hook in next ch, yo and draw up a loop, yo and pull through 1 loop (counts as ch 1), [yo and draw through 2 loops] twice.
  • ch – chain
  • fdc – foundation double crochet – Yo, insert hook in ch 1 from previous st, yo and draw up a loop, yo and pull through 1 loop (counts as ch 1), [yo and draw through 2 loops] twice.
  • ea – each
  • rep – repeat
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • sp – space
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • yo – yarn over
  • * Rep instructions after asterisk as indicated.

A Little Bit of Bling Shawl, free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

Pattern Notes:

  • Entire shawl is crocheted holding one strand of ea yarn together.
  • Shawl is worked from top (long) edge with steady decreases to point.

Pattern Instructions:

Shawl

  • Holding one strand of ea yarn, beg fdc, 103 fdc. (104 sts) (To adjust size, fdc in multiples of 4 sts until the appropriate length for long edge is reached.)
  • Row 1: Turn, *ch 5, sk 3 sts, sc in next st; rep from * across. (26 ch-5 sp)
  • Row 2: Turn, *ch 5, sc in next ch-5 sp; rep from * across.
  • Row 3: Turn, sl st in ea of first 3 ch in first ch-5 sp, *ch 5, sc in next ch-5 sp; rep from * across to last ch-5 sp, sk last ch-5 sp. (Decreases 2 sets of ch-5 sp)
  • Row 4: Rep Row 2.
  • Rep Rows 3 & 4 until 2 ch-5 sp remain, ending after Row 4.
  • Row 5: Turn, sl st in ea of first 3 ch in first ch-5 sp, ch 5, sc in next ch-5 sp. Fasten off. (1 ch-5 sp)
  • With yarn needle, weave in ends.  Spray block if necessary.

A Little Bit of Bling Shawl, free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

 

Make and attach fringe

  • For each fringe, hold one strand of each yarn together and cut strands to 40” (100 cm).
  • To attach fringe using crochet hook, insert hook into st or sp indicated below.  With fringe strands folded in half, insert hook into fold (center) of strands, pull up a loose loop in st or sp. Yo with both halves of the fringe strands and pull through the loop. Tighten loop to hold fringe in place.
  • Starting from top corner, use crochet hook to join fringe to third ch of first ch-5 sp. Working across angled edge, *sk next ch-5 sp, join fringe in next ch-5 sp; rep from * across edge until 2 ch-5 sp before center point.   Attach 2 strands of fringe (2 strands of ea yarn/4 strands of yarn) to center point, sk next ch-5 sp, rep from * along edge. Trim fringe as necessary.

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© 2014 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use it to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2014/09/01/free-pattern-a-little-bit-of-bling-shawl. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

A Little Bit of Bling Shawl, free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

FO Friday: Diamond Eye Beanie

Last week, I mentioned I was working on some designs for the My Mountain Hat Design contest using Schachenmayr‘s My Mountain line of yarns.  For my first submission, I used this skein of Bravo Big Color in Fire Print.

Bravo Big Color Fire Print

As many of my readers know, I’m a super slow knitter, so I knew the super bulky yarn would be perfect for a knit design.  I was actually able to finish the sample in a week’s time.

I wanted to make a unisex beanie because the color seemed perfect for men and women.  I also wanted to have an unusual traveling cable design, with something other than stockinette (or reverse stockinette) stitches inside of it, running up the center.  I decided to make the rest of the hat ribbed so it would be extra stretchy.  That way, it can be worn with a variety of hair styles without leading to “hat head.”

I named the pattern the Diamond Eye Beanie, and I made the sample in a men’s size (just to make sure there’d be enough yarn for a larger size).  I wrote the pattern to include a smaller, women’s size, too.

Unfortunately, MC wasn’t very excited about modeling a heavy hat in 80+ degree weather, so I took just one picture of him wearing it inside, protected by the air conditioning.

Unfortunately, MC wasn't very excited about modeling a heavy hat in 80 degree weather.

He was, however, happy to serve as my chief photographer, and snapped some great pictures of me wearing the beanie in front of Central Park on Sunday.

You can see it's a bit large for my head.

You can see it’s a bit large for my head.

Diamond Eye Beanie on Marie close up front1

I love the moss stitch (a.k.a. double seed stitch) detail in the center of the cable.  It’s a bit hard to see in the picture above because of the vibrant yarn color, but in person it’s more noticeable.

Diamond Eye Beanie close up cable

You can see the details of the cable and it’s center a little better in this closeup.

Diamond Eye Beanie on Marie side view

You could also wear the cable off center, but I tend to prefer symmetry.  (Boring, I know.)

Diamond Eye Beanie flat

Designers were asked to talk about our own version of My Mountain, “a goal that feels unattainable – right up until the moment you reach it.”  I’m proud to say that I’ve achieved a few of those type of goals in my lifetime – and have others planned for the future.

One that’s been on my mind lately was being the first person in my father’s family, and one of just a handful in my mom’s family (at that time), to graduate from college.  There were many times when that degree seemed really out of reach, but with persistence, faith, and hard work, I was able to complete my bachelor’s degree.  I’ve even gone on since to earn two Master’s degrees at night while working full time.  The best thing about achieving this goal is that now going to college and graduating is more common in my family, and my younger relatives don’t even see it as being unusual.

For more finished objects, visit Tami’s Amis.

FO Friday: Brooklyn’s Baby Blanket

Way back in February, I learned my cousin had a newborn daughter via Facebook.  Her name is Brooklyn. (Yes, like me, my cousin was born in Brooklyn, but he hasn’t lived there for about 20 years).

I decided to make her a baby blanket using some stash yarn.  I started with the motif from Frankie Brown‘s Jelly Mould Blanket and some leftover Red Heart Super Saver in Candy Print, but I ran out of yarn after 14 squares.  The stiffness of the yarn was the perfect pairing with this pattern.

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Jelly Moulds through 2013-02-06

Since I didn’t have another complementary color in my stash, I thought it would be the perfect time to use my 20% off coupon to the Lion Brand Yarn Studio.  Once at the shop, I decided I wanted to go in a new direction, and instead of choosing more pink, I picked up three skeins of Vanna’s Choice in greens.  (I was feeling a bit spring-like at the time.)  Vanna’s Choice is much softer than the Red Heart, so it wasn’t as suited for the 3D shape of the Jelly Mould motif.

Jelly Mould and African Flower

At around the same time, Barbara from Made in K-Town released her African Flower Square Tutorial, and I decided to make 14 African Flower squares.  I had to make some adjustments, of course, to get the motifs to be the same size.

African Flower

And then, for good measure, I decided to make 14 (modified versions) of Ellen Gormley‘s Sunny Spread motifs.

Sunny Spread Row

I used a stash skein of Caron One Pound in white for all the borders, and joined each of the motifs in rows of 7.

Brooklyn Baby Blanket

I had a bit of a tough time taking pictures (thank you Central Park, for serving as a backdrop!), but I really like how the blanket came out.  It’s about 32 inches square, and I used about 990 yards of yarn (including about 530 yards of stash yarn!).

Brooklyn baby blanket folded

The whole project was much more improvised than my baby blankets usually are.  I guess you could say that the motifs came about organically.  And I used different techniques for joining the squares together to form rows, which helped to even out the slight differences in sizes.  I also used two different methods for joining the rows together (the green join is a very decorative v-stitch join, and the white join is a chain join).  These joins were inspired by ones I found in Robyn Chachula‘s Crochet Stitches VISUAL Encyclopedia.

Brooklyn baby blanket 2

I think this means that my next blanket may be a bit more spontaneous!

For more finished objects, visit Tami’s Amis.