New Year, New Skill CAL Week 2: Double-Ended Crochet

New Year, New Skill Crochet-a-Long with CAL Central - January 16 - March 6, 2017 - Week 2: Double-Ended Crochet - Visit CAL Central on Facebook or Ravelry for more details

I love double-ended crochet, and it’s very related to Tunisian crochet, so it seemed like a great technique for Week 2 of the New Year, New Skill crochet-a-long! This week features three different double-ended crochet patterns! (If you’re just hearing about the CAL, you can find more details and a regularly updated schedule here.)

This post contains affiliate links.

Week 2: Double-Ended Crochet

Double-ended crochet goes by many names. You may have heard it referred to as double-ended Tunisian crochet, crochet on the double, crochenit, or even other names. You need a specialized double-ended crochet hook to make these projects. These days, double-ended hooks are available in a variety of lengths and materials. I prefer to make my own double-ended hooks using my Denise2Go Crochet for a Cure 2-Hook Set, which can also be configured as Tunisian hooks or standard crochet hooks.

How to join the New Year, New Skill CAL

  • Get the full schedule here. You can join in by crocheting the patterns as you have time.
  • Share your progress and post pictures of your finished projects. Tag your projects and posts #calcentralcrochet on all social media.
  • If you’d like to chat with other crocheters, join our Facebook or Ravelry groups.
  • Each week, our featured designers will be available to answer questions in our groups and to share some of their other work with you.
  • By the end of the CAL you’ll have up to 26 beautiful projects and will have learned or mastered 7 different skills.


New Year, New Skill Week 2 Patterns

Choose one (or more) of these patterns to help you learn or master double-ended crochet!

If you’re joining us for the New Year, New Skill CAL, feel free to use this button for your Ravelry projects and on social media!

I'm crocheting this project with CAL Central #calcentralcrochet on Facebook and Ravelry

Free double-ended Tunisian crochet pattern: Skinny Minny Scarf

Skinny Minny Scarf, free double-ended Tunisian crochet pattern and tutorial by Underground Crafter

Double-ended crochet is one of my favorite hidden secrets of crochet. It’s much easier to do than it seems and it creates fabulous reversible projects.

This post contains affiliate links.

If you’ve never done double-ended crochet before, the Skinny Minny Scarf is the perfect pattern to try it on.

Skinny Minny Scarf, free double-ended Tunisian crochet pattern and tutorial by Underground CrafterI used two different weights of yarn – Red Heart Boutique Unforgettable, a medium weight yarn, and Red Heart Grande, a super bulky weight yarn. I love the way this turned out! It’s a great accent scarf to wear year round.

If you’re new to double-ended crochet, I’ve included a video tutorial after the pattern.

Skinny Minny Scarf, free double-ended Tunisian crochet pattern and tutorial by Underground CrafterDon’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or with my Facebook page if you make one!

Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy

Rebeckah's Saturday Link Party

Skinny Minny Scarf

Double-Ended Tunisian Crochet Pattern

by Underground Crafter

Skinny Minny Scarf, free double-ended Tunisian crochet pattern and tutorial by Underground Crafter02-easy 50US terms 506-superbulky4-medium 50This long and skinny accent scarf adds some color to your outfit with the added benefit of providing protection against the wind.

 

Finished Size

  • Adult. 3.5” (9 cm) wide x 59.5” (151 cm) long.

Materials

  • Red Heart Grande (76% acrylic/22% wool, 5.29 oz/150 g/46 yd/42 m) – 1 skein in Nectar (CA), or approximately 46 yd (42 m) in any super bulky weight yarn.
  • Red Heart Boutique Unforgettable (100% acrylic, 3.5 oz/100 g/280 yd/256 m) – 1 skein in Springtime (CB), or approximately 56 yd (51 m) in any medium weight yarn.
  • US Size Q/16 mm double-ended crochet hook, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn needle.

Shop for Red Heart Boutique Unforgettable at your favorite retailer! Jo-Ann | Annie’s | Amazon

Shop for Red Heart Grande at your favorite retailer! Jo-Ann | Amazon

Gauge

  • 8 sts in pattern = 3.5” (9 cm) wide. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • CA – Color A
  • CB – Color B
  • ch – chain
  • ea – each
  • rep – repeat
  • sk – skip
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • Tss – Tunisian simple st – Insert hook under next vertical bar, yo and draw up loop onto hook.
  • * Repeat instructions after asterisk as indicated.

300 X 250 banner

Pattern Note

  • Always sk first vertical bar (below first loop on hook) at beginning of row.
  • A video tutorial is available at the end of this pattern.

Pattern Instructions

Scarf

  • With CA, ch 8.
  • Row 1: Turn, sk 1 ch, *insert hook in next ch, yo and pull up a loop; rep from * across. (8 sts)
  • Row 2: Slide loops to other hook, turn. With CB, ch 1, *yo and draw through 2 loops; rep from * across.
  • Row 3: Tss in ea vertical bar across.
  • Row 4: Slide loops to other hook, turn. With CA, ch 1, *yo and draw through 2 loops; rep from * across.
  • Row 5: Rep Row 3.
  • Rep Rows 2-5 until scarf measures approximately 58” (147 cm) long, or until 45” (114 cm) of CA remain, or until desired length is reached, ending after Row 4.
  • Final Row: With CA, *insert hook under next vertical bar as for Tss, yo and draw up a loop, yo and draw through both loops on hook; rep from * across. Fasten off.

Finishing

  • With yarn needle, weave in ends.
© 2016 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2016/05/25/free-double-ended-tunisian-crochet-pattern-skinny-minny-scarf. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or with my Facebook page if you make one!

Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy

Giving Tuesday – The Crochet (and Knitting) Way

Today is Giving Tuesday, a national day of giving. I’m sharing some of my favorite crochet and knitting related charity links today in honor of this event, which encourages us to put aside the shopping for a moment during the holiday season. I hope this roundup with inspire you to share your talent (or money!) with charities that are important to you.

If you’re looking for a crochet-a-long, Sunset Family Living is hosting the annual 12 Days of Christmas Charity Challenge (also known as the NICU charity challenge). She is challenging people to crochet 12 hats for preemies in their local neonatal intensive care unit. Last year, over 26,000 (!) hats were donated as part of the challenge, which runs through January 6, 2015. 20 crochet designers have donated hat patterns, and if you’d like to sign up to participate, you can read more about the project here.

Dozen Baby Hats (in the round), a free knitting pattern by Denise Balvanz. Image (c) Denise Balvanz.
Dozen Baby Hats (in the round), a free knitting pattern by Denise Balvanz. Image (c) Denise Balvanz.

If you’re more of a hat knitter, check out Denise Balvanz’s free patterns, Dozen Baby Hats (in the round) and Dozen Baby Hats (knit flat). Both patterns were inspired by the Afghans for Afghans June-July Baby Shower, and are great projects to donate to a local charity, too.

Some designers sell specific patterns to raise funds for a favorite charity. Some of my favorites are the Mitered Cross Blanket (knitting) by Kay Gardiner. All proceeds from the sale of this pattern are donated to Mercy Corps, an international emergency response/disaster relief organization.

Mitered Crosses Blanket by Kay Gardiner. Image (c) Kay Gardiner.
Mitered Crosses Blanket by Kay Gardiner. Image (c) Kay Gardiner.

Dawn Hansen donates a portion of the proceeds from the sales of her Autism Awareness Puzzle Hat (knitting) pattern to the Autism SocietyCharity Windham’s Ten Stitch Twist for loom knitters pattern raises funds for Frankie Brown’s (interviewed here) favorite charity, the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation.  And speaking of Frankie Brown, she has has over 240 (!) free crochet and knitting patterns. She would greatly appreciate a donation to the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation through her Just Giving page.

Wheels within Wheels, one of my favorite patterns by Frankie Brown. Image (c) Frankie Brown.

Anastacia Zittel uses the same model, and appreciates a contribution to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America in exchange for her free knitting pattern, Armwarmers, or for any of her over 65 free crochet patterns. (I also interviewed Anastacia here.)

Alexis Winslow’s Caring Cowl (knitting) is another fundraiser pattern. Alexis donates proceeds from this pattern to the American Red Cross.

Caring Cowl by Alexis Winslow. Image (c) Alexis Winslow.
Caring Cowl by Alexis Winslow. Image (c) Alexis Winslow.

I donate $1 from each sale of my 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets ebook, which includes 20 crochet and 10 Tunisian crochet patterns that are great for pet blankets, to a local no-kill pet charity each year.

A selection of stitches included in 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets.
A selection of stitch patterns included in 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets.

I also donate pet blankets in the sizes suggested by the Snuggles Project. (I interviewed Deborah Green from Bideawee about blanket donations here, if you’d like to hear how local shelters use these blankets.) The website allows you to search for a local pet charity that accepts handmade blankets. The Snuggles Project is a program of Hugs for Homeless Animals.

Another organization that accepts handmade goodies is Project Linus. Their mission is to “provide love, a sense of security, warmth and comfort to children who are seriously ill, traumatized, or otherwise in need through the gifts of new, handmade blankets and afghans, lovingly created by volunteer ‘blanketeers.'”You can find out more about donating a crocheted or knit (or sewn) blanket to a local chapter, contributing funds to help defray shipping costs or volunteering on their website.

The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet. Image (c) Bella Crochet.
The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet. Image (c) Bella Crochet.

If donating an entire blanket is out of your crochet comfort zone, Warm Up America is another charity that distributes blankets and accessories to a variety of social services agencies. You can send a blanket square, or accessories such as hats or scarves to them for distribution. The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet is a great free crochet pattern for making children’s hats for charity.

Twisted Cable Scarf and Headband, a free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman. Image (c) Kim Guzman.
Twisted Cable Scarf and Headband, a free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman. Image (c) Kim Guzman.

You might also be interested in the Red Scarf Project from Foster Care to Success. Each year, they coordinate the delivery of Valentine’s Day care packages, including handmade scarves, to young adults who have aged out of foster care as they experience life on their own at college. You can learn more about this charity in the current issue of Crochetvolution here. There are also two great free crochet patterns in this issue, Big Red and Vino Scarf, that would make great projects for the Red Scarf Project. You can also try some of Kim Guzman’s many great free winter patterns. (I interviewed Kim here.) Two of my favorites that would be perfect for the Red Scarf Project are the Reversible Pinstripe Scarf (double-ended crochet) or the Twisted Cable Scarf.

What are your favorite charities to share your crochet and knitting with?

Crochet Pattern: Tadley’s Diagonal Blanket

Tadley's Diagonal Blanket, free double-ended crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

My regular blog readers know I have a soft spot in my heart for baby blankets. I actually love crocheting blankets in general, but by the time I get about halfway through a full sized blanket, I’m usually questioning my own sanity. Baby blankets are much faster to make, and they always seem to be cherished by parents and babies alike.

Last year, one of my dearest friends was expecting her first born, and I knew I had to make something special. I had recently finished the sample for the Checkerboard Cable Scarf that was published in Love of Knitting‘s Holiday, 2013 issue.

This post contains affiliate linksThe yarn for the sample was generously provided by King Cole.

blog LoK Checkerboard Cable Scarf
Photo (c) Creative Crafts Group, LLC.

The generous folks at King Cole had sent me quite a lot more Merino Blend Aran than what was required for the scarf, and I knew my friend was having a boy.

King Cole Merino Blend Aran
I had 9 skeins in each color left after knitting the scarf!

The white and blue seemed like just the right colors for his blanket, and the easy care of the superwash wool seemed a great fit for a newborn.

Tadley's Diagonal Blanket, free double-ended crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

I used double-ended crochet because it looks great – but different – on both sides, and it makes a nice, thick blanket. After all, Tadley was due in late December, so I thought he might need something very warm for his stroller or car seat during the winter.

Tadley's Diagonal Blanket, free double-ended crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

To combat the love-hate relationship I develop with all of my crocheted blankets during the last few rows, I crocheted this on the bias, increasing towards the center and then decreasing until the end. Once I reached the center, each row was shorter than the one before it, so finishing the blanket was a breeze.

Tadley's Diagonal Blanket, free double-ended crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

Well, almost a breeze. On the last few rows, I ran out of yarn. I ordered one extra skein in each color, and by some strange miracle, both skeins were from the same dye lots as the yarn I received from King Cole almost five months before.

Tadley's Diagonal Blanket, free double-ended crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

This blanket is very lush and thick, and works equally well as a playmat in the spring or a stroller blanket in the winter. Gauge isn’t critical, and it can be easily resized (though you may need more or less yarn).

Tadley's Diagonal Blanket, free double-ended crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

I used a flexible double-ended crochet hook made from my Denise2Go interchangeable crochet hook set, but my pattern testers used other types of double-ended crochet hooks, including long, straight hooks. Enjoy!

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Tadley’s Diagonal Blanket

Double-Ended Crochet Pattern

by Underground Crafter

02-easy 50US terms 504-medium 50A simple reversible project crocheted on the bias with a double-ended crochet hook!

Finished Size: Adjustable. Photographed sample is 36” (91.5 cm) square.

Materials: 

  • King Cole Merino Blend Aran (100% superwash wool, 1.75 oz/50 g/88 yd/80 m) – 10 skeins each in Denim 778 (CA) and in Aran 776 (CB), or approximately 840-1,000 yd (770-915 m) in each of 2 colors in any medium/worsted weight yarn.
  • I/9 5.5 mm flexible double-ended crochet hook, or size needed to obtain gauge. (I recommend the Denise2Go Crochet for a Cure 2-Hook Set.)
  • Yarn needle.

Gauge: 18 sts x 18 rows in Tss = 4” (10 cm). Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern:

  • CA – color A
  • CB – color B
  • ch – chain
  • ea – each
  • rep – repeat
  • Rnd(s) – Round(s)
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sp – space
  • st(s) – sts
  • Tfs – Tunisian full stitch (used to increase 1 st in this pattern) – Insert hook under horizontal bar (between 2 vertical bars), yo and draw up loop onto hook.
  • Tss – Tunisian single stitch – Insert hook under next vertical bar, yo and draw up loop onto hook.
  • Tss2tog – Tunisian simple stitch 2 together (used to decrease 1 st in this pattern) – Insert hook under next 2 vertical bars, yo and draw up loop onto hook.
  • yo – yarn over

Pattern notes:

  • Always sk first vertical bar (below first loop on hook) at beginning of row.
  • Blanket is crocheted in rows on the bias, increasing to the center and then decreasing to end. Border is crocheted in the round.
  • Weaving in ends in double-ended crochet projects can be challenging. Change colors at beginning or end of rows when possible.
  • For edging, a stitch marker or piece of scrap yarn can be used to indicate corner st.

Pattern Instructions

Blanket

  • With CA, ch 3.
  • Set Up Row: Sk 1st ch. (Insert hook in next ch, yo and pull up a loop) twice. (3 loops)

Increase stitch count to center

  • Row 1: Slide loops to other hook, turn, with CB, ch 1, *yo and draw through 2 loops; rep from * across.
  • Row 2: Tfs in first sp between vertical bars, Tss in each vertical bar across to last sp, Tfs, Tss in last st. (Increase by 2 sts)
  • Row 3: Slide loops to other hook, turn, with CA, ch 1, *yo and draw through 2 loops; rep from * across.
  • Row 4: Rep Row 2.
  • Rep Rows 1-4 until sides measures approximately 34”/86 cm (or desired length), ending after Row 3.

Decrease stitch count to end

  • Row 5: Tss2tog, Tss in ea vertical bar across to last 3 sts, Tss2tog, Tss in last st. (Decrease by 2 sts)
  • Row 6: Rep Row 1.
  • Row 7: Rep Row 5.
  • Row 8: Rep Row 3.
  • Rep Rows 5-8 until 3 sts remain on hook, ending after Row 3.
  • Final Row: With CB, (insert hook in next vertical bar as for Tss, yo, draw through both loops on hook) twice. Fasten off.

Edging

  • Rnd 1: Facing side where CA is more prominent, join CB with sc in corner, 2 sc in same st, *sc in edge st of ea row across to next corner,** 3 sc in corner; rep from * around twice, then from * to ** once. Fasten off.
  • Rnd 2: Turn, facing side where CB is more prominent, join CA with sc in corner st, 2 sc in same st, *sc in each st around to next corner,** 3 sc in corner; rep from * around twice, then from * to ** once. Fasten off.
  • Rnd 3: Rep Edging Rnd 1.
  • Rnd 4: Rep Rnd 2.
  • With yarn needle, weave in ends.

Add to Ravelry

© 2014 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use it to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2014/05/21/free-pattern-tadleys-diagonal-blanket/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

A Challenge Accepted

YOP3 yarn

Life became rather too complex for me to do any work towards Year of Projects goals.  And, then, suddenly it was December.

Last year, I did a lot of advanced holiday crafting, and I even finished all of my gifts by mid-November.  This year, not so much.  When Thanksgiving rolled around last week, I realized I was in for some trouble and sat down to look at my handmade holiday list.

Amigurumi Nativity heads

I started this nativity set for my Mom at the end of May, using Carolyn Christmas‘s Amigurumi Nativity pattern.  Currently, I have six heads and I just bought fiber fill, pellets for the bases, and some safety eyes.

My mom also liked this hat I designed, and asked for one in black.  Luckily, I have just the yarn in my stash.

Mountain Colors Twizzle

A few weeks ago, I received this beautiful skein of Mountain Colors Twizzle in Swift Current from Mountain Colors to review.  I figured you can’t review a yarn without trying it out, and something about it said shawl to me.  On Friday, I picked up the delightful Shaping Shawls by Anna Dalvi (an awesome book, by the way) and decided to try my and at designing a simple knit crescent shawl for my younger sister.  It’s about two-thirds finished now.

Geaux SaintsAnd speaking of my sister, I started an earwarmer for her boyfriend.  They currently are in law school in New Orleans but he’s accepted a job in Houston after graduation in May.  This will be reversible: one side will be for the New Orleans Saints and the other for the Houston Texans.  I’ve finished the first side in Tunisian crochet and it will need some serious blocking before it is gift.

Bill hat notes

I have little more than these notes I took earlier this year about my Uncle Bill’s hat.  He has one of those factory made cashmere hats, and I was planning to make a handmade version with some scrumptious Galler Yarns Pashmina I have on hand.  So far, other than the finding the note (which took some time!), identifying the yarn, and picking out needles, I’ve done nothing.

Diagonal blanket both sides

Luckily, I have finished one project – from my original YOP list, no less – a baby blanket for my dear friend’s newborn.

And then there are the 7 or so more handmade gifts that I haven’t even started yet. Oh, and 4 design samples due in mid-December for a magazine (but I haven’t received the yarn support yet).

So here’s my challenge to myself: finish a project every 2 days between now and the end of December.  What do you think?  Can it be accomplished?

For more Year of Projects posts, visit this thread on Ravelry.