Crochet Pattern: Ruth Cloche

Free crochet pattern: Ruth Cloche in Dream in Color Classy by Underground CrafterThe Ruth Cloche is a crochet cloche with a gentle texture. This subtle crochet stitch pattern is perfect for highlighting a hand dyed yarn. It’s also a one skein project, which makes it perfect for making with that extra special yarn skein.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Yarn for the sample was generously provided by Dream in Color.

Several years ago, I designed a series of crochet patterns inspired by pioneering aviatrixes. The Ruth Cloche was inspired by Ruth Elder, who was also an actress with a flirty sense of style. (Apparently, being a pilot in the early days was an expensive endeavor; everyone had to have a side job to get access to planes.)

Ruth Elder, photograph by Leslie Jones at the State House in Boston http://www.lesliejonesphotography.com/collection?page=35
Ruth Elder at the State House in Boston. Photo by Leslie Jones.

My friend, Carlota, was my model for these photos taken at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodome. I feel like we were able to capture the spirit of the 1920s, don’t you?

Free crochet pattern: Ruth Cloche in Dream in Color Classy by Underground CrafterIn order to create the structured feel of a cloche, you’ll need to work your stitches a bit tighter than usual. I did this using a smaller crochet hook to get a tighter gauge. Definitely, check your gauge on this project if you want it to fit correctly.

Free crochet pattern: Ruth Cloche in Dream in Color Classy by Underground CrafterThe Ruth Cloche was previous a premium (for sale) pattern on Ravelry, but I came across the sample this fall and fell in love with it again. I decided to make it a freebie pattern.

Free crochet pattern: Ruth Cloche in Dream in Color Classy by Underground CrafterI hope you enjoy wearing it as much as I do!

If you make your own Ruth Cloche, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter. You can also share a picture in the Underground Crafters Facebook group. Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a coupon code for your choice of one of my premium patterns and other subscriber goodies. Plus, you’ll never miss one of my free patterns again!

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Ruth Cloche

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

Free crochet pattern: Ruth Cloche in Dream in Color Classy by Underground CrafterThe inspiration behind this pattern is Ruth Elder, a pioneering aviatrix and actress. Ruth placed fifth in the first Women’s Air Derby in 1929 and was a charter member of the Ninety-Nines: International Organization for Women Pilots.

Ruth Elder was a fabulous dresser with a flirty sense of style. This cloche is based on one she wore. The gently textured stitch pattern showcases the hand dyed yarn. This timeless piece is also a great one-skein project.

Finished Size

  • Adult: 20” (51 cm) circumference

Materials

  • Dream in Color Classy yarn (100% superwash Merino, 4 oz/113 g, 250 yd/229 m) – 1 skein 180 Visual Purple, or approximately 230 yd (210 m) in any medium weight yarn.
  • US H-8/5 mm crochet hook, or any size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn needle.
  • Stitch marker.

Gauge

  • Through Rnd 9 in pattern = 4” (10 cm) diameter. For best results, always check your gauge.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • BL – back loop only – Marly Bird has a helpful video for identifying the back loop here.
  • ch – chain
  • ea – each
  • FL – front loop only – Fiber Flux has a helpful video for identifying the front loop here.
  • hdc – half double crochet
  • invdec – invisible decrease – Insert hook in FL of ea of next 2 sts, yo and draw up a loop, yo and draw through 3 loops. Planet June has a helpful invisible decrease tutorial here.
  • rep – repeat
  • Rnd(s) – Rounds()
  • sc – single crochet
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • yo – yarn over
  • * Rep instructions after asterisk as indicated.
  • [] Rep instructions between brackets as indicated.

Pattern Notes

  • This hat is crocheted in the round from the crown to the brim in spirals without joining. Move marker up each round.
  • Oombawka Design has a helpful magic ring tutorial here.

Pattern Instructions

Hat

  • Beginning at crown, start with magic adjustable ring (see Pattern Notes).
  • Rnd 1: Ch 1, 8 sc in ring, place marker in last st and move up ea rnd. Tighten ring to close. (8 sts)
  • Rnd 2: 2 scBL in ea st around. (16 sts)
  • Rnd 3: *Hdc in next 3 sts, 2 scBL in next st; rep from * around. (20 sts)
  • Rnd 4: *2 scBL in next, scBL in next 4 sts; rep from * around. (24 sts)
  • Rnd 5: *2 scBL in next st, scBL in next 3 sts; rep from * around. (30 sts)
  • Rnd 6: *Hdc in next 3 sts, 2 scBL in next st, scBL in next st; rep from * around. (36 sts)
  • Rnd 7: *2 scBL in next st, scBL in next 3 sts; rep from * around. (45 sts)
  • Rnd 8: *2 scBL in next st, scBL in next 4 sts; rep from * around. (54 sts)
  • Rnd 9: *Hdc in next 3 sts, 2 scBL in next st, scBL in next 2 sts; rep from * around. (63 sts)
  • Rnd 10: *2 scBL in next st, scBL in next 6 sts; rep from * around. (72 sts)
  • Rnd 11: *2 scBL in next st, scBL in next 8 sts; rep from * around. (80 sts)
  • Rnd 12: *Hdc in next 3 sts, 2scBL in next st, scBL in next 4 sts; rep from * around. (90 sts)
  • Rnd 13: *2 scBL in next st, scBL in next 8 sts; rep from * around. (100 sts)
  • Rnd 14: ScBL in ea st around.
  • Rnd 15: *[ScBL in next 3 sts, hdc in next 3 sts] 3 times, scBL in next st, 2 scBL in next st; rep from * around. (105 sts)
  • Rnd 16: *ScBL in next 20 sts, 2 scBL in next st; rep from * around. (110 sts)
  • Rnd 17: Rep Rnd 14.
  • Rnd 18: *Hdc in next 3 sts, scBL next 2 sts; rep from * around.
  • Rnds 19-20: Rep Rnd 14 twice.
  • Rep Rnds 18-20 until hat measures 7” (17.5 cm) from crown.
  • Rnd 21: *Sc in both loops in next 20 sts, invdec; rep from * around. (105 sts)
  • Rnd 22: Sc in both loops of each st around.
  • Rnd 23: *ScFL in next 10 sts, 2 scFL in next st; rep from * around to last 6 sts, scFL in next 5 sts, 2 scFL in next st. (115 sts)
  • Rnd 24: *ScBL in next 4 sts, 2 scBL in next st; rep from * around. (138 sts)
  • Rnd 25: ScBL in each st around.
  • Rnd 26: Rep Rnd 25. Sl stBL in next 2 sts, fasten off.

Finishing

  • With yarn needle, weave in ends on inside of hat. Optional: Spray block.
© 2014, 2018 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: https://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2018/12/26/crochet-pattern-ruth-cloche/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Crochet Pattern: Warm and Textured 1-Skein Cowl

Warm and Textured 1-Skein Cowl, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

Back in 2011, I went to my favorite local yarn shop, Knitty City during the NYC Yarn Crawl and picked up four beautiful skeins of yarn.

This post contains affiliate links.

Underground Crafter yarn haul from Knitty City
From left to right: Dream in Color Classy in Spring Tickle, Malabrigo Rios in 16 Glazed Carrot and 859 Primavera, and Dream in Color Classy in Happy Forest.

My original plans were for a sampler blanket, but over the years the other skeins were used for different projects until just the one remained.

Dream in Color Classy in Spring Tickle on Underground Crafter
Dream in Color Classy in Spring Tickle.

I even tried planned to include it in my Temperature Scarf, but (based purely on weather patterns) I only ended up using it for one row! It’s such a lovely skein that I knew I had to make something I could use frequently with it, but since all the coordinating skeins I purchased with it were used up, I wanted to make a one-skein project.

Warm and Textured 1-Skein Cowl, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

This snug cowl is a great small project to test out your post stitch skills. It has two different types of clusters to make a richly textured surface.

Warm and Textured 1-Skein Cowl, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

The half double crochet stitches are nice and plump, and keep the cold air out. It’s a perfect project to keep out the winds on a chilly day.

Add to Ravelry

And please share pictures if you make one – I’d love to see your version! Enjoy!

Warm and Textured 1-Skein Cowl

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

Warm and Textured 1-Skein Cowl, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter

03-intermediateUS terms 504-medium 50This cabled cowl makes a bold statement with just one skein.

Finished Size

  • Adult: 9” (23 cm) wide x 20” (51 cm) long (blocked).

Materials

    • Dream in Color Classy (100% superwash Merino wool, 4 oz/113 g, 250 yd/229 m) – 1 skeins in Spring Tickle, or approximately 250 yd (229 m) in any medium weight yarn.
    • US I-9/5.5 mm crochet hook, or any size needed to obtain gauge.
    • Yarn needle.

Gauge

  • 12 sts x 14 rows in pattern = 4” (10 cm) unblocked. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern (✪ see Special Stitch Patterns, below)

  • ch – chain
  • ea – each
  • FPcl – front post cluster – (Yo, insert hook from front around back to front of st, yo and draw up a loop to the height of current row, yo and draw through 2 loops) 3 times, yo and draw through all 4 loops on hook. Sk st behind FPcl.
  • FPdc – front post double crochet – Yo, insert hook from front around back to front of st, yo and draw up a loop, (yo and draw through 2 loops) twice. Sk st behind FPdc. (A video tutorial for this stitch is available here.)
  • hdc – half double crochet
  • pop – 6-hdc popcorn – Hdc 6 times in same st, remove hook from loop and insert hook from front to back of first hdc in group, pick up dropped loop and pull through loop on hook.
  • rep – repeat
  • RS – right (front) side
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • WS – wrong (back) side
  • * Rep instructions after asterisk as indicated.

Pattern Instructions

Cowl

  • Ch 34.
  • Row 1: (WS) Turn, sk first ch, sc in next st and ea st across. (33 sts)
  • Row 2: (RS) Turn, ch 2 (counts as hdc, here and throughout), hdc in next st and ea st across.
  • Row 3: Rep Row 2.
  • Row 4: Turn, ch 2, hdc in next 4 sts, FPcl around next st 2 rows below, hdc in next 5 sts, (FPdc around next st 2 rows below, pop in next st, FPdc around next st 2 rows below, hdc in next 5 sts) twice, FPcl in next st 2 rows below, hdc in next 5 sts.
  • Row 5: Rep Row 2.
  • Row 6: Turn, ch 2, hdc in next 4 sts, FPcl around next FPcl, hdc in next 5 sts, [(FPdc around next FPdc, hdc) twice, hdc in the next 5 sts] twice, FPcl around next FPcl, hdc in next 5 sts.
  • Row 7: Rep Row 2.
  • Row 8: Turn, ch 2, hdc in next 4 sts, FPcl around next FPcl, hdc in next 5 sts, (sk FPdc, FPdc around next FPdc, hdc, working in front of last FPdc, FPdc around skipped FPdc, hdc in next 5 sts) twice, FPcl around next FPcl, hdc in next 5 sts.
  • Row 9: Rep Row 2.
  • Row 10: Turn, ch 2, hdc in next 4 sts, FPcl around next FPcl, hdc in next 5 sts, (FPdc around next FPdc, pop, FPdc around next FPdc, hdc in next 5 sts) twice, FPcl around next FPcl, hdc in next 5 sts.
  • Row 11: Rep Row 2.
  • Row 12: Rep Row 8.
  • Row 13: Rep Row 2.
  • Rep Rows 6-13 7 more times, or until cowl measures approximately 21” (53 cm), ending after Row 13. Do not fasten off.

Finishing

  • Fold cowl in half with RS facing and line up short edges to join with slip stitches. Fasten off. Weave in ends. Spray block.

Add to Ravelry

© 2015 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2015/01/30/free-pattern-warm-and-textured-1-skein-cowl. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

New crochet patterns in Dream in Color yarns!

I love Dream in Color! Ok, now that I’ve gotten that statement out of the way, let me tell you about two crochet patterns I’ve just released featuring two different Dream in Color yarns.

Both patterns continue the series of designs I’ve been working on that are influenced by the pioneering women of flight. The first one is the Ruth Cloche in Dream in Color Classy.

Ruth Cloche, crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter.Classy is one of my favorite yarns (and has been since 2011, according to this blog post). It’s a soft superwash Merino wool yarn and it’s what I consider a true worsted (medium weight) yarn in that it isn’t too thin or too bulky. And, like all the yarns from Dream in Color, it’s beautifully hand dyed and washes well.

This design was influenced by Ruth Elder, who was both an aviatrix and a film actress. She had a great sense of style and I was completely draw to this series of photographs of her from 1928, including the one below where she’s sporting a cloche. (You can find more great pictures of her on my Ruth Elder Pinterest board.)

Ruth Elder, pioneering aviatrix and film actress, on Underground Crafter blog
Ruth Elder at the State House, Boston. Image via Boston Public Library’s Flickr stream. Photographer: Leslie Jones.

My friend, Carlota Zimmerman from the Creativity Yenta, seemed to channel her inner Flapper in these pictures.

Ruth Cloche, crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter.
And the great sign at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodome really draws out the colorway (Visual Purple) of the yarn.

The Ruth Cloche has a subtle stitch pattern which adds some textural interest while letting the stunning hand dyed Dream in Color Classy shine! It’s now available for sale on Ravelry here. Dream in Color shared it on their Facebook page here.

The next pattern is inspired by Louise Thaden, who I talk more about in this post.

Thaden's Asymmetrical Shawl, crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground CrafterThe Thaden’s Asymmetrical Shawl is crocheted with one skein of Jilly Lace in Wineberry. When I first contacted Dream in Color about the design, they recommended that I use Jilly Lace, which was new on the market at the time so I had never tried it before.

Thaden's Asymmentrical Shawl crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground CrafterI’m so glad they suggested this yarn! Jilly Lace is a beautiful, superwash Merino wool lace weight yarn. Unlike some lace weight yarns I’ve worked with, it winds into a cake really easily from the hank. It’s got a great drape and, of course, like all Dream in Color yarns, the dyeing is just stunning.

Thaden's Asymmetrical Shawl crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground CrafterThis shawl has a scalene triangle shape and an asymmetrical border. I featured a simple stitch pattern that includes eyelets and crossed stitches for an interesting texture that doesn’t distract from the colorway. You can buy Thaden’s Asymmetrical Shawl on Ravelry here. Dream in Color featured it on their Facebook page here.

Both patterns are one-skein projects, so if you’ve been considering trying out Dream in Color Classy or Jilly Lace, these are great projects to test out the yarn with! Enjoy.

 

NaBloPoMo

I’m participating in BlogHer’s National Blog Post Month (also known as NaBloPoMo) by blogging daily through November, 2014.

2013 Temperature Scarf: Lessons Learned

I’m excited to say that I did finish crocheting my temperature scarf this week.  The 113 remaining rows just flew by.

blog Temperature scarf folded roll

I ended up using 8 different colorways for this project.

Temperature Scarf Yarn Collage

 

Four of the skeins (Dream in Color Classy in Spring Tickle and Happy Forest and madelinetosh tosh vintage in Fragrant and Cove) were purchased at my favorite local yarn shop, Knitty City; two others (Miss Babs Yowza–Whatta Skein! in Violets in the Grass and madelinetosh tosh vintage in Midnight in Manhattan) were picked up at another local yarn shop, The Yarn Company; and I bought the two remaining skeins (Molly Girl Chart Topper in Anastasia and Aella) from a local dyer at the North Jersey Fiber Arts Festival.

2013 Temperature Scarf outline

My original plan called for the use of just 7 yarns, but since 24% of the year’s dates fell into the same temperature range, I ended up running out of yarn for one of the temperature ranges and adding another yarn.

Since I was crocheting at a significant lag (I recorded the temperatures throughout the year, but ended up crocheting most of the scarf after November), I was able to make a substitution.  If I were to make another temperature scarf, I’d use a shorter range of temperatures, perhaps 8 degrees for each color.

blog Temperature scarf folded detail

Of course, this would mean that some colors wouldn’t be used at all.  As it stands, the Spring Tickle (representing the coldest temperature range) was only used for two rows.

One thing I’m happy I didn’t do was assign colors based on their association to the temperature.  Many of the temperature scarves I’ve seen use blues for lower temperatures and reds for higher temperatures, for example.  I just arranged my colorways in an order that was pleasing to my eye when I first started this project, and then assigned the temperatures in that order.

blog Temperature scarf folded flat

Another thing I would do differently (though I LOVE how the Violets in the Grass colorway looks in this scarf) would be to only use yarns with a very similar thickness.  The Miss Babs yarn is much thinner than the rest, and I used a larger hook for those rows to keep the gauge similar.

Now that the scarf is blocked, I’d really like to add some buttons.

blog Temperature scarf folded top

 

The stitch pattern I’ve used for this scarf sort of naturally forms a row of button holes at the edge.  But with all of these colors, it’s hard to pick a good set of buttons.  Naturally, I dug through my collection first.

blog Temperature scarf button ideas

I’m leaning towards using the blue square buttons at the top left and maybe the black and white polka dots.  I don’t want to seal this up permanently as an infinity cowl/circle scarf, but I think I’m less likely to wear it as a scarf, so buttons seemed the perfect solution.

Or, should I just go out and try to find buttons specifically for this project?  What do you think?

Overall, I really enjoyed my first conceptual crochet project. It was interesting to give away control of the striping and to create a project that I absolutely couldn’t have imagined at the beginning.  I think my next conceptual crochet project will be a blanket of some kind – but that’s not until I work through more of my remaining stash!

And, on that note, I’m pleased to say that I used up 873 yards of yarn with this project.  My scarf measures about 8.5″ (21.5 cm) by 79″ (200.5 cm), which is pretty long for me since I’m only 5’3″ (1.6 m).  It’s gorgeous though, and perfect for the next cold spell.

Temperatures are rising

The last several months have been a whirlwind.  As a result of constant activity at work, home, and in life, books languished in my Currently Reading shelf on Goodreads, crochet and knit projects stalled in my project bags, and over 100 blogs I follow sat unread in Feedly.  But recently, things have cleared up – I now have a new job, everyone’s health in my household seems to be improving, and I’ve been inspired to jump back into the creative world again.  (As a side note, I decided that it would be best to just wipe out the nearly 700 blog posts that were unread and start fresh.  So if I missed out on some significant event on your blog since July, I’m sorry!)

On that note, I’ve recently returned to my 2013 Temperature Scarf (free pattern here).  I had last worked on it in May, and it looked like this:

Temperature scarf through 2013-05-24.jpg

At that point, I had used all but one of the 7 yarns I had set aside for this project.  Over the weekend, I sat down and plotted the daily high temperatures from May 25 through November 15, and started crocheting.  I had a lot of fun, and remembered why I love this project to begin with.

Temperature scarf thru 2013-09-06

Yes, it is a little wonky, but between the different yarns and the five month lapse, what can you expect?  Besides, it’s nothing that a little blocking (and perhaps a border) won’t cure.

But you might have noticed something.

Temperature scarf thru 2013-09-06 from end

Yes, one colorway really is about half of the scarf.  It turns out that we had a relatively mild summer, and a relatively warm fall.  So the temperature range 75-87 degrees has been used way more than any other range.  My scarf is only current through September 6, but I have charted through November.  And there’s just no way I’ll have enough of this delightful skein to finish out the year.

Temperature scarf thru 2013-09-06 from beginning

So for now, I’ve put the scarf aside while I decide what to do next.  I could choose another yarn for that range, but I had worked so hard to only use stash yarns for this, and I don’t seem to have a compatible full skein of medium weight superwash wool in my stash.  Perhaps I’ll venture out on Small Business Saturday and buy another skein.  Or perhaps I should combine some color ranges?  With only about 45 days to go to the year, I can’t help but notice that I’ve used virtually none of these two skeins.

Temperature scarf yarns

On the left, I have madelinetosh tosh vintage in Cove, representing the high range of temperatures, and on the right I have Dream in Color Classy in Spring Tickle, representing the low range of temperatures.  What do you suggest?

As for reading, I finished two knitting related books in the last week: Follow the Yarn (I’ll be a part of the blog tour on Friday, and will share an interview with author Reba Linker) and Sweater 101: How to Plan Sweaters That Fit… and Organize Your Knitting Life At the Same Time.  I’ll definitely have to write a separate post about Sweater 101 because it blew my mind!  I’m not sure which book from the shelf I’ll pick up next, but I have a little less than 7 weeks (and 15 books to go) to meet my goal of reading 65 books this year.  I guess I better get reading!

Don’t forget to check out more Work in Progress Wednesday posts at Tami’s Amis, and more Yarn Along posts at Small Things.