Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Embroidery sampler pillow against quilted background

Practice simple embroidery stitches while creating a boho stitch sampler in an abstract, modernist style. Use a Cricut Maker with a free cut file to mark and cut this faux hoop art pillow. It makes a great decoration or quick gift, too.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. This post is sponsored by Cricut, but all opinions and thoughts are my own. Additional materials for this post were generously provided by Baby Lock, Fairfield World, and Taunton Press.

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Embroidery sampler pillow against wood background

Ever since I got a Cricut Maker last year, I have been on a little bit of a sewing spree. As I’ve mentioned in my previous posts about the Cricut Maker Rotary Blade (here and here), the Maker has been my dream machine. I love the ease of cutting fabric (even into complicated shapes like an adorable bear softie) without a stabilizer with materials that are included in the Maker box (that is, the Rotary Blade and the FabricGrip Mat). Using the Washable Fabric Pen makes it easy to mark up your fabric with sewing lines for attaching pieces, or to create embroidery lines.

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Embroidery sampler pillow against bedspread with embroidered pillow

Since adding the Maker to their machine line up, Cricut has really stepped up their game by offering lots of projects for sewists in Cricut Design Space. Like, seriously, hundreds. They’ve also started carrying fabric in their online shop, including designer samplers, genuine leather (in addition to faux leather), quilt panels (in case the patchwork part of quilting isn’t so much your thing), felt, and even pre-cut fabric (if you want to jump right into sewing with less cutting).

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Cricut Sewing Kit in box

And, of course, once you start carrying fabric and catering to sewists, you need to add tools, right? For this project, I used the Cricut Sewing Kit, which includes a set of fabric shears, thread snips (which are perfect for embroidery, too), seam ripper, thimble, measuring tape (because I know personally I can never have enough of these!), and pins with a pin cushion. If the Cricut has inspired you to do quilting, you may also want to consider the Rotary Cutting Kit.

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Cricut Sewing Kit out of box

Let me back it up a bit to tell you more about today’s project. A while back, Taunton sent me a review copy of Boho Embroidery: Modern Projects from Traditional Stitches by Nichole Vogelsinger. I have always loved hand embroidery since childhood, but I never really had the patience for the detailed projects that were popular then. Once I got old enough to have the patience, my eyesight wasn’t good enough for the detailed work that complex embroidery projects required. Boho Embroidery inspired me to take more of a freeform approach to embroidery, and that’s where I got the idea for this sampler pillow. I don’t have lots of wall space, so while hoop art is, in theory, awesome, there’s no real place to hang it in my apartment. A pillow seemed more practical so I decided to make a faux hoop using my Cricut Maker! I didn’t have to worry about making drawing a perfect hoop circle because the Cricut can do that for me.

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Supplies for embroidery

My sampler is very simple. I used the Washable Fabric Pen to make the circle for the hoop outline and then I freeformed a variety of stitches (which are labeled below). If you’d like to have a more structured sampler, you can add more embroidery lines with the Washable Fabric Pen to your cut file by choosing Customize before you cut.

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow

Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Embroidery sampler pillow against quilted background

I created a simple, pieced pillow using fabric from a Cricut Riley Blake quilt kit. The centerpiece of the pillow is a faux hoop art circle featuring an abstract, modernist embroidery sampler.

Finished Size

  • Approximately 7” (18 cm) before stuffing.

Tools

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Cricut Maker with supplies

Materials

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Cricut Sewing Kit out of box

Instructions

Mark and Cut Your Fabric

  • Press your fabric with your EasyPress 2 with EasyPress Mat, or iron with other heat-safe surface.
  • Open the Boho Stitch Sampler cut file in Design Space.
  • Select Customize to add additional embroidery lines if desired. Click on Make It to start your project. Place the fabric on the mat, install the Washable Fabric Pen, and then follow the instructions for cutting.
  • Remove your fabric from the mat. Use the fabric shears to cut away the unused fabric to save for a future project.

Create Your Embroidery Sampler

  • Place your marked piece of fabric into the embroidery hoop, using the circle as a guide for the hoop.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Fabric on top of embroidery hoop
  • If you’re using your Cricut BrightPad, plug it in and turn it on. Adjust the illumination level based on your embroidery floss and fabric colors, and the ambient lighting in your room.
  • Create your sampler using your chosen colors of embroidery floss and your favorite embroidery stitches. Use your thimble if necessary and trim threads after knotting on back with the thread snips.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Sampled stitches in progress
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Embroidery sampler removed from hoop
  • After you finish doing the sampler stitches inside of the hoop, remove your fabric from the hoop and use your EasyPress 2 or iron to press it flat. Then work the back stitch around the marked circle to create your faux hoop.

Assemble the Pillow

  • Once your sampler piece is completed, trim down the fabric with your hoop art to measure 5” (13 cm) square, with the faux hoop centered in the middle.
  • Pin the short fabric rectangles to the sides of this square.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Pinned front of pillow with pin cushion, scissors, and measuring tape
  • Sew the rectangles in place using a 1/4″ seam.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Pillow being sewn on Baby Lock Jubilant machine
  • With your EasyPress 2 or iron, press the seams towards the darker fabric.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | First panels sewn to pillow top
  • Pin the longer rectangles to the sides of the fabric piece.
  • Sew the rectangles in place using a 1/4″ seam.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Pinned fabric on front of pillow
  • With your EasyPress 2 or iron, press the seams towards the darker fabric.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Pieced front of pillow
  • Position the square piece of fabric on top of the seamed piece of fabric with the right sides facing.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Backing fabric
  • Sew both pieces together using a 1/2″ seam and leaving approximately 3” (7.5 cm) open.
  • With your fabric shears, cut the triangle out on each seamed corner as shown in the picture.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Pillow inside out
  • Pull the right side of the pillow out through the 3” (7.5 cm) opening.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Unstuffed pillow turned right side out
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | partially stuffed pillow
  • With thread and needle, fold over the seams of the opening and hand sew closed.
Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Pillow next to bag of Poly-Fil

Enjoy your pillow!

Boho Stitch Sampler Pillow with Cricut Maker Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Embroidery sampler pillow against faux fur background

Year of Projects: Crochet Master Class – Painted crochet finale

(This post is part of my Year of ProjectsCrochet Master Class series. You can read the other posts in this series here.)

I just have a quick update today, since I’m packing after celebrating Mother’s Day with my mom to get ready for my vacation.  I finally finished my painted crochet trivet!

When you last saw my trivet, it looked like this:

I was trying to decide what to do next after running out of the orange I started with before the orange and red round.

I ended up choosing a relatively dark orange and a red from the collection of solid embroidery floss I had on hand.

You can see that the orange and red are different than the other colors I used.

 

Then I did another round with both strands of red.

Yep, I ran out again.

I really wanted to end as I started, with rounds of double crochet instead of single.  But I just didn’t have enough of the embroidery floss.  At this point, I just said to myself, “This is a trivet, not a wearable.  Just finish the thing already.”

You can see the last few stitches are in another red.

I still have to weave in the ends and block it.  (Yes, I am blocking a trivet.  It’s for me and I want it to look right!  With all the different threads, stitches, and tensions I combined as I tried to make a rainbow of color on this trivet, it ruffled quite a bit.)

So, what did I learn about painted crochet from this experience?  Well, it is much easier to do than it looks.  Basically it is just a matter of holding multiple strands of a thread, embroidery floss, or thin yarn to make slow color effects.

On the other hand, it requires a fair amount of planning, since the impact of the color changes is dependent on you have the right amounts for each color change.  I don’t see myself using the technique frequently because I don’t really like buying a lot of supplies which are mostly unused.  But I definitely will be making some more scrappy trivets with my embroidery floss – I have way too much and so rarely embroider.

The ends

I took two vacation days from work and had a four-day weekend.  (Actually, it was a three-and-a-half-day weekend, since I taught my Tunisian Crochet class at the Adult School of Montclair on Monday night.)  I was brimming with creative energy, but after thoroughly depressing myself writing this post last week, I forced myself to spend most of my weekend crocheting time weaving in the ends on my sister’s blanket.

 

Yep, these are the ends I’m talking about. Sigh.

I’m so glad to finally be almost finished with this blanket.  I’ll say it right now for the record – I’ll never again wait until after assembling the entire blanket to weave in all the yarn tails!  (At least, not until the next time I do it.)

I’ve also been thinking a lot about this post from When Did I Become a Knitter.  For the life of me, I cannot understand why all I can think about is starting new blanket projects while I’m sitting here cursing the one I’m still finishing.  Perhaps this is some form of peculiar insanity or masochism that afflicts crocheters and knitters…

I did start a small trivet on Easter Sunday as part of my exploration of painted crochet for Year of Projects.

You’ll notice that the ends are woven in already.  That’s right, I’m reformed.

I ran out of the variegated orange “craft cord” (also known as embroidery floss) I was using and don’t think I’ll have enough red for the final round.  (As you can see, I already switched from double crochet to half double crochet to single crochet to adapt to the increasing yardage requirements each round.)

I dug through my embroidery floss stash and found these oranges and reds.

I thought I might finish the last rounds with these to complete the “rainbow.”  Hopefully, I will have enough.

I’m even considering a black border.  

 

What do you think? Do the solids “go” with the rest of the trivet? What about the black border idea?

I’m not quite sure why I’m making such a huge fuss about a trivet made from embroidery floss that was buried in my stash… but I’d like it to be super pretty :).

I’m also working on some samples with the Parisian Cotton and Inca Eco from Galler Yarns.  I will unveil these secret projects for public viewing in the near future.

As for reading, I’m trying to finish The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest today before my loan from the Brooklyn Public Library expires at midnight.  Keep your fingers crossed for me!  The waiting list is huge, so if I don’t finish in time, it could be several weeks before I get my hands on the Kindle version again.

For more Works in Progress, visit Tami’s Amis.  For more Yarn Along posts, visit Small Things.

Year of Projects: Crochet Master Class – Painted Crochet

This post contains affiliate links.

(This post is part of my Year of ProjectsCrochet Master Class series. You can read the other posts in this series here.)

After a few weeks of taking detours from the lessons in Crochet Master Class: Lessons and Projects from Today’s Top Crocheters, I decided to dive back in with painted crochet.  Ferosa Harold, from Trinidad and Tobago, is the crochet master profiled in this chapter.  Her work is really stunning, and though I’m not much of a thread person, I’m contemplating buying 50 Fabulous Pineapple Motifs to Crochet, which Ferosa co-wrote with Jean Leinhauser.

This was a tough chapter to approach because you obviously need a rainbow of colors.  I don’t have a lot of reds, oranges, and yellows in my collection, and of course, I’m trying to bust stash.  I decided to open a pack of Loops & Threads Craft Cord.

This was purchased in a moment of weakness, before I was fully committed to stash busting.

Side story: Last year, I enrolled in an eight week embroidery class with my friend at the Ukranian Museum.  We decided it would be super fun since it was only $60 for 8 weeks (and 2-1/2 hours a week)!  Little did we know (though I suppose we could have guessed) that the class would be dominated by a few people who liked to debate loudly about politics within the Ukranian community.  Since neither of us are Ukranian (and both of us prefer quieter, less controversial crafting time), it wasn’t really a good fit.  Also, I realized after about two classes that my eyesight isn’t really good enough for embroidery any more, and I lack patience.  But before all of these realizations were had, I purchased this craft cord which has since been dormant in my bins.

I recently bought a new slow cooker with a ceramic insert, and I thought a rainbow trivet was in order.  I feel a bit nervous about using some of the harder trivets in the house on the ceramic.

My craft cord converted into “yarn balls.”

My plan was to create the trivet following “ROY G BIV.”  I made a bit of a mistake when winding so I realized that I couldn’t work from red to violet because I didn’t have enough violet anymore.  And, there was nothing in the pack which could be considered indigo.  So instead, I worked from violet back to red.  At least, that was the plan…

Round 1 – Two strands of violet.

 

Round 2 – One strand each of violet and blue.

 

Round 3 – Two strands of blue.

 

Round 4 – One strand each of blue and green.

 

Round 5 – Two strands of green.

 

Round 6 – Oops.

I made it up until round 6 before the amount of thread I had would no longer complete a round.  So, I had to make some adjustments.

Round 6 – One strand each of green and yellow (in half double crochet).

 

Round 7 – Two strands of yellow (in single crochet).

 

Round 8 – One strand each of yellow and orange (in single crochet).

 

Round 9 – Two strands of orange (in single crochet).

And this is what I have left.

Definitely not enough red and orange for two more rounds.

 

I could pull it out and start again, all in single crochet; end it here without the rest of the rainbow; or venture into the rest of my embroidery floss stash.  I’m not sure if I’ll like the look of solids combined with variegated floss.  I’ll have to think through the next steps before picking my hook up again!