Knitting Pattern: Ribbon Stitch Cowl

Ribbon Stitch Cowl, free #knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter. Slip stitches make colorwork easy on this simple, unisex cowl.Today’s free knitting pattern has been in the works for (ahem) over two and a half years. Let me explain.

Back in January, 2013, I went to Vogue Knitting Live and I picked up two skeins of yarn.

Ribbon Stitch Cowl, free #knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter. Slip stitches make colorwork easy on this simple, unisex cowl.The one on top is Full Moon Farms Fabulous Yarn. If you’d like to meet the wonderful shearer/dyer/spinner/farmer behind this yarn, Laura Watson, you can check out my interview with her here. I was drawn to it because it had rainbow colors but also a lot of black. And, I had already been chatting with Lindsey from Bartlettyarns about his machine spun, made in the USA yarns, and so I picked up a coordinating black skein (on the bottom). You can read my interview with Lindsey and Susan from Bartlettyarns here.

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And then, for the next few years, I couldn’t find the “right” project. I started a few projects with these yarns over the years, but nothing that seemed perfect. But then I chanced upon a stitch pattern that I thought would be perfect for a cowl in these two colors.

Ribbon Stitch Cowl, free #knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter. Slip stitches make colorwork easy on this simple, unisex cowl.Now both yarns felt a little too scratchy for direct-to-skin wearing, so I knew that I wanted to knitfelt (or full, also known as shrinking it!) the finished project. For that reason, I made it a little larger than what I needed.

728x90OctoberBannersThe knitfelting makes the fabric a little denser, which will help to keep out the cold in the winter. Of course, you can make your version without knitfelting, and it will be pretty warm, too.

Ribbon Stitch Cowl, free #knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter. Slip stitches make colorwork easy on this simple, unisex cowl.Although it looks complicated, this cowl is actually easy enough for most beginner knitters to make. Slip stitches make the colorwork easy.

Ribbon Stitch Cowl, free #knitting pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter. Slip stitches make colorwork easy on this simple, unisex cowl.You can use any two colors of yarn to make this project. I used a solid (black) yarn and a variegated yarn with black highlights, but you could use two contrasting solids, too.

Don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or with my Facebook page if you make one!

Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy

Expand Your Knitting SkillsRibbon Stitch Cowl

Knitting Pattern by Underground Crafter

02-easy 50US terms 504-medium 50Slip stitches make colorwork easy on this simple, unisex cowl project.

 

Finished Size

  • Cowl: 24” (61 cm) circumference x 8.25” (21 cm) width (before felting)/21” (53 cm) circumference x 8” (20 cm) width (after felting).

Materials

  • Bartlettyarns 2 Ply (100% wool, 4 oz/113 g, 210 yd/192 m) – 1 skein in Black (CA), or approximately 120 yd (110 m) in any medium weight yarn.
  • Full Moon Farm Fabulous Yarn (100% wool, 4 oz/113 g, 175 yd/160 m) – 1 skein (CB), or approximately 70 yd (64 m) in any medium weight yarn.
  • US Size 8/5 mm knitting needles, or any size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn needle.

Gauge

  • 18 sts = 4” (10 cm) in pattern. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

CraftsyAbbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • BO – bind off
  • CA – Color A
  • CB – Color B
  • CO – cast on
  • k – knit
  • p – purl
  • pw – purlwise
  • rep – repeat
  • RS – right (front) side
  • sl – slip
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • wyib – with yarn in back
  • wyif – with yarn in front
  • * Rep instructions after asterisk as indicated.

Special Stitch Patterns

  • sl 1 pw wyib = slip 1 st purlwise with yarn in back = Bring yarn to back as if to knit. Insert right needle under next st as if to purl and slip to right needle.
  • sl 1 pw wyif = slip 1 st purlwise with yarn in front = Bring yarn to front as if to purl. Insert right needle under next st as if to purl and slip to right needle. Return yarn to back.

Pattern Notes

  • Carry unworked color up side of project.
  • To make a scarf instead of a cowl, repeat Rows 1-8 until approximately 59” (150 cm) long, or 1” (2.5 cm) shorter than desired length, ending after Row 4. Follow remaining rows of pattern. Additional yarn will be required.
  • For a scrappy version, use one color as CA, and alternate colors for Rows 1-2 and 5-6 throughout.
  • Be sure to carry yarn for slip stitches and up rows loosely to avoid puckering.

Pattern Instructions

  • With CA, CO 37 sts, (or any multiple of 4 sts, + 5 sts).
  • Set Up Row 1: (Right Side) K across.
  • Set Up Row 2: P across.
  • Set Up Rows 3-6: Rep Rows 1 & 2 twice.
  • Row 1: With CB, k1, *k3, sl 1 pw wyib; rep from * across to last 4 sts, k4.
  • Row 2: With CB, k4, *sl 1 pw wyif, k3; rep from * across to last st, k1.
  • Row 3: With CA, k across.
  • Row 4: With CA, p across.
  • Row 5: With CB, k1, *k1, sl 1 pw wyib, k2; rep from * across.
  • Row 6: With CB, *k2, sl 1 pw wyif, k1; rep from * across to last st, k1.
  • Rows 7 & 8: Rep Rows 3 & 4 once.
  • Rep Rows 1-8 until approximately 23” (58 cm) long, ending after Row 4. Fasten off CB.
  • With CA, rep Set Up Rows 1 & 2 twice.
  • With CA, BO as for Row 3 in pattern. Fasten off CA with long yarn tail, approximately 24” (30.5 cm), for seaming.

Finishing

  • With RS facing, use yarn needle to seam short ends together on the wrong side using whipstitch. (A photo tutorial for the whipstitch is available here.) Fasten off. With yarn needle, weave in ends on wrong side. Turn cowl right side out. Spray block if necessary. Optional: knitfelt (full) to shrink and make cowl denser. (A photo tutorial for knitfelting in the washer and dryer is available here.)
© 2015 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2015/10/02/free-knitting-pattern-ribbon-stitch-cowl/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or with my Facebook page if you make one!

Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy

Interview with Laura Watson from Full Moon Farm

At Vogue Knitting Live 2013, I had the pleasure of meeting Laura Watson from Full Moon Farm.  Laura’s yarns were extremely colorful – and so was she! – so I was immediately drawn over to her booth.  It was wonderful to learn that she’s a New York State local (about 90 minutes north of New York City).  I ran into her again at 2014’s event, and she was kind enough to take some time from the busy lifestyle of a farmer/shearer/spinner/dyer/entrepreneur to share an interview.

You can find Laura online at the Full Moon Farm website and their Facebook page.  You can find out more about their yarn and fiber here and learn where to buy their products here.

Laura Watson at Full Moon Farm's Vogue Knitting Live booth in 2014.
Laura Watson at Full Moon Farm’s Vogue Knitting Live booth in 2014.

Underground Crafter (UC): Besides shearing, spinning, and dyeing, do you also crochet, knit, and/or weave?

Laura: I knit, but am a rank amateur. It is on my list to get better. I felt and do Australian Locker Hooking.

The Full Moon Farm booth at Vogue Knitting Live in 2013.
The Full Moon Farm booth at Vogue Knitting Live in 2013.

UC: Tell us more about your motivation for starting Full Moon Farm, and about its expansion.

Laura: I grew up on a sheep and beef farm. I (like all my siblings) moved away from the farm but then, in the end (like all my siblings) I returned to farming. I stuck with the sheep. I like them and can manage them, physically, without assistance. My flock started with 1 bred ewe, Border Leicester.  I added Corriedale and then Merino, so now my flock is a motley mix with decent body size for meat, and nice, fine wool for spinning and felting.

Felted signs in the Full Moon Farm's booth at Vogue Knitting Live in 2014.
Felted signs in the Full Moon Farm’s booth at Vogue Knitting Live in 2014. 

UC: Some of us urban dwellers have fantasies about moving out to the country and starting a farm. Can you tell us a bit about the realities of farm living and working?

Farming is a 24/7 life. One must be prepared for fencing or haying a field in the heat of the summer or checking on the flock in the middle of the night in the cold during lambing season. The benefits are the beauty of the pasture or hay field, the coziness of a full hay loft, new born lambs – so sweet and bouncy – and fiber.

Felted hats at the Full Moon Farm booth at Vogue Knitting Live 2014.
Felted hats at the Full Moon Farm booth at Vogue Knitting Live 2014.

UC: One of the things that struck me about your booth at Vogue Knitting Live was your colorways. Where do you find your inspiration as a dyer?

Laura: I love color and have so much fun dying my yarns and spinning fiber. I usually go with colors I like. I am not afraid to combine colors and just go with my gut to choose what combinations to make. I have recently started trying to be more focused and going with a theme such as “Mom’s Flower Garden” or “Field of Sunflowers.”

Yarn at the Full Moon Farm booth at Vogue Knitting Live 2014.
Yarn at the Full Moon Farm booth at Vogue Knitting Live 2014. 

UC: You have the opportunity to travel to many fiber related events. Tell us about some of your favorite fiber festival experiences.

Laura: I love going to fiber festivals because I know that the people attending are there because they love (or like a lot) fiber, so we already have something in common. I like to see what the other vendors are doing too because there is such versatility in wool and other fibers. It makes me smile just writing about it.

More yarn on display at the Full Moon Farm booth at Vogue Knitting Live 2014.
More yarn on display at the Full Moon Farm booth at Vogue Knitting Live 2014.

My favorite event is a little fiber festival in Clermont, NY at an historic site. It is called The Chancellor’s Day Sheep and Wool Festival. The setting, on the banks of the Hudson River, is idyllic, and they do historic re-enactments, such as shearing sheep using an antique shearing machine. It has grown in size and popularity over the years but remains small, quaint, and very friendly.

Thanks so much for stopping by, Laura!

By the way, I love the look of the skein I bought from Laura in 2013.  It has since been wound into a yarn cake and is awaiting transformation into a beautiful project!

Full Moon Farm Fabulous Yarn

Vogue Knitting Live 2014: Day 2

VKL NYNY

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My second day at Vogue Knitting Live started off with no hot water at home (and who doesn’t love showering in cold water when it’s sleeting outside?).  In the rush to get out the door, I forgot to take the ceremonial pre-show picture of me in my handmade goodies.  (I was wearing my 2013 Temperature Scarf, which is perfect for cold weather.)

My first stop was an interview with the delightful Kate Atherley from Wise Hilda.  I should be posting it in a few weeks.  I asked her to pose with her two books, Beyond Knit & Purl and Knit Accessories.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Kate Atherley

Then I walked through the fashion and art exhibits.  I’m planning a separate post about these, so I’m sharing just one picture today.  This is a crocheted piece by fashion designer, Gabriela Serigatto.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Gabriela Sarigatto2

My next stop was the Marketplace.  I learned a lot from Rosemary Drysdale‘s Entrelac: The Essential Guide to Interlace Knitting, and she was signing books at the Vogue Knitting booth.

VKL NYC 2014 Rosemary Drysdale Autograph

From there, I snuck over to the Leilani Arts table.  You see, they sell this Soft Donegal yarn, which has become the favorite amongst the men in family: soft but charcoal (with a little tweed to keep my interest).

VKL NYC 2014 Studio Donegal

I promised my dad I’d make him a version of this cabled hat, so I needed another skein.  Melissa Leapman rung up my sale.

Then, I went to the Knitty City booth (it’s always a treat to see your favorite local yarn shop at an event) to get my copy of Knitwear Design Workshop: A Comprehensive Guide to Handknits signed by Shirley Paden.

VKL NYC 2014 Shirley Paden autograph

Shirley was really quite friendly and we had a nice chat about her class on Craftsy, which is a companion to the book, as well as the We Love Shirley Paden group on Ravelry.  (Shirley assures me she didn’t name the group!)  The group sounds like a lot of fun and they have even hosted three Design-a-Longs.

I had a few minutes after the book signing to watch the beginning of the Fiber Factor Fashion show.  I learned there will be KALs throughout 2014 and the next “season” will begin in 2015, but I missed the announcement of the winner.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Fiber Factor Rachel Henry Gates of Dawn

This stunning felted dress, Gates of Dawn by Rachel Henry, was one of my favorite Fiber Factor projects on display.

Believe it or not, I had time for two more quick stops before reaching my final VK Live destination.  I took a picture of Virginia from Yellowfarm (interviewed here), who I met at last year’s event.

blog VKL NYC 2014 YellowFarm Virginia

And, then I visited the Full Moon Farm booth, to snap a picture of Laura.  My interview with her will be coming up soon.  We met last year, too.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Full Moon Farm Laura

And then I headed off to the Michelle’s Assortment booth.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Michelle's Assortment Michelle

I helped out in Michelle’s booth for a few hours in the afternoon, so she could stretch her legs and walk around the Marketplace for a bit.  It was a great opportunity to learn more about her creative process.  She’s sponsoring two months of prizes for my 2014 Sampler Mystery Knit-a-Long, so it was great to meet her in real life and see all of her awesome shawl pins, bookmarks, and stitch markers.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Michelle's Assortment circles

I particularly like Michelle’s round shawl pins.  It was also great to see her collaboration with other indie business owners.  Michelle had several samples from Ash Kearns on display to show off her shawl pins including Havelock (left) and Everton Lace Wrap (right), along with the print versions of the patterns.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Michelle's Assortment Ash Kearns samples

Of course, I couldn’t spend all that time in Michelle’s booth without falling in love with some shawl pins.  I was initially drawn in by the circles, I ended up choosing two straight pins for myself.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Michelle's Assortment goodies

These will definitely need to be re-shot in natural lighting because you can’t see the beauty in this picture.  I’m off to get some rest before Day 3!