How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground CrafterToday’s #TipsTuesday post is a guest post from Karen Whooley, the crochet designer, author, and teacher. Karen is going to share her tips for working with hand dyed yarn and introduce us to her new book, Coastal Crochet. If you love the beauty of hand dyed yarn but aren’t quite sure how to work with it, Karen’s three tips will give you the confidence to use up those beauties in your stash!

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

About Karen Whooley

How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground Crafter - Karen WhooleyKaren is an award winning, internationally known crochet designer, author, and instructor. She develops patterns and teaches classes for crocheters who want simplicity and elegance wrapped up in adventure.

Karen is the author of Coastal Crochet, A Garden of Shawls, Crochet Rocks Socks and 17 other books as well as many patterns published in books and magazines.  Her classes both online and live are some of the most sought after in the crochet genre. Crochet is her passion and she wants to take that passion and inspire her students in any way she can. Most importantly, Karen wants to bring each student self-confidence and enable her students to take what they have learned so that they can happily create whatever spurs their own crochet passion.

Show your support by following Karen on:

Website | Instagram | Facebook | Ravelry Designer Page | Ravelry Group | Subscribe to her newsletter to get 35% off new pattern releases


How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn

Guest Post by Karen Whooley

Hello everyone! I am thrilled that Marie asked me to do a guest post on the blog today! I am looking forward to chatting with you all!

I am Karen Whooley and this year marks my 20th year as a crochet designer and instructor. I develop patterns and teach classes for crocheters who want simplicity and elegance wrapped up in adventure. I am the author of 21 books as well as many patterns published in other books and magazines. Crochet is my passion and I want to take that passion and inspire crocheters in any way I can. Most importantly, I want to bring each crocheter self-confidence and enable them to take what they have learned from my designs and classes so that they can happily create whatever spurs their own crochet passion.

How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground Crafter - Coastal Crochet coverIn my new book Coastal Crochet (and also, last year’s book, A Garden of Shawls), most of the patterns are made with hand-dyed yarns. I love indie dyers. I always want to support small businesses as I am a small business too. I think it is very important to support each other in this way. I am always on the lookout for new hand dyers to work with!

How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground Crafter - Shorline from Coastal Crochet
Shorline from Coastal Crochet by Karen Whooley

But taking care of hand dyed yarns can be tricky sometimes. If the color isn’t set properly, it can bleed into other colors that may be in your project. Sometimes there are special fiber blends, such as silk or linen (or even milk or corn!), that may require you to take some extra special care when laundering your project. Today I want to talk to you about how to make sure your yarns stay as wonderful as the day you got them!

Colorfastness

I have a little trick I do to let me know if a yarn’s color has been set correctly for colorfastness. I cut a small piece of the yarn off and let it soak in a glass of water. If the color bleeds into the water changing the color from clear to something else then you know that you might need to be cautious on how you deal with the yarn. Put the hank in a lingerie bag and wash it in a gentle cycle in your washing machine or hand soak for a bit then lay flat to dry. I use a bit of wool wash but you don’t necessarily have to do that. If you are still having bleeding issues, especially if you are finding that the color bleeds on your hands, contact the dyer for other recommendations.

How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground Crafter - Elemental Fiberworks Star Stuff Sock
Elemental Fiberworks Star Stuff Sock yarn

If you are using colors such as red or black, or any dark color with a lighter color, always check the colorfastness. Prepping the yarn before you start crocheting or knitting will save you heartache later!

Working with Hand Dyed Yarns

Each hank of hand dyed yarn is unique. Sometimes the color varies from hank to the next.This can be a problem when you are crocheting or knitting along and you add the next hank. All of a sudden on section of the project is darker than the other,

How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground Crafter - Cove from Coastal Crochet
Cove from Coastal Crochet by Karen Whooley

This color difference is normal because everything is done by hand! Although the dyers try hard to keep the colors the same, there are always some sort of difference. To avoid having this obvious difference in color on in the project, make sure you work two hanks at a time.

This is how I do it:

  1. Work two rows with the first hank.
  2. Pick up the next hank and work two rows
  3. Pick up the first hand and work two rows
  4. Keep going back and forth in this manner to blend the two hanks.
How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground Crafter - Deep Blue Sea from Coastal Crochet
Deep Blue Sea from Coastal Crochet by Karen Whooley

Laundering Your Hand Dyed Yarn Project

The type of fibers in your hand dyed yarn is going to determine how you launder your project.

Animal fibers can be wet soaked in a sink. I don’t recommend putting the item in the washing machine the first time you wash the project, unless you had to do some additional prepping before you started. Always wash in cold water and use a wool wash or a gentle detergent. If you soak the piece, lay it out on a towel and roll it up and press to get the excess water out. Always lay flat to dry, shaping or blocking as you need to.

How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground Crafter - Beachside from Coastal Crochet
Beachside from Coastal Crochet by Karen Whooley

If you have a yarn that is in some form at least a part linen or silk, I do not recommend soaking or machine washing at all. If the project is in need of cleaning, I would bring it to the dry cleaner and carefully instruct them about what fibers are in the piece. If you just need to block the piece, do a steam block with a hot iron or steamer, making sure you get the project damp but not soaking. And make sure you do not touch the piece with the iron or steamer. I have found you can melt fibers that way. (ask me how I know)

Cotton is a beast of its own. I recommend a steam block but others will soak or machine wash on a gentle cycle If in doubt, take to the dry cleaners.

If there is a specialty fiber like bamboo, milk, corn or something else, I would recommend reading the label and contacting the dyer if you are still unsure what to do.

How To Work with Hand Dyed Yarn by Karen Whooley for Underground Crafter - Inner Yarn Zen Gradient
Inner Yarn Zen Gradient yarn

I hope this little post answers questions about working with hand dyed yarns! If you have any other questions on this topic, I am glad to answer them! You can contact me directly through my website.

© 2018 by Karen Whooley and published with permission by Underground Crafter. This article is for personal use only. Do not violate Karen’s copyright by distributing this article or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the article, point your friends to this link: https://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2018/08/07/how-to-work-with-hand-dyed-yarn/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Thank you, Karen, for sharing these tips with us! Show your support by following Karen on:

Website | Instagram | Facebook | Ravelry Designer Page | Ravelry Group | Subscribe to her newsletter to get 35% off new pattern releases

Tips and Tricks for Making Pompoms and Tassels with Fiat Fiber Arts | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

Tips and Tricks for Making Pompoms and Tassels by Fiat Fiber Arts for Underground CrafterEmily from Fiat Fiber Arts is joining us again and she’s sharing her best tips and tricks for making pompoms and tassels. Pompoms and tassels make great additions to any crochet, knitting, or craft project. They can even make projects by themselves! If you struggle with making plump and beautiful pompoms and tassels, read on for Emily’s best tips (and check out her video).

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

About Emily Reiter from Fiat Fiber Arts in Her Words

Fiducia Clutch, free Tunisian crochet pattern with embroidery tutorials by Fiat Fiber Arts for Underground Crafter

As a Catholic wife and mother of 5 small children, the most common remark I get regarding my work is, “How do you find the time?” My half-joking answer is “neglect.” Cross-stitch was my first fiber love. I’ve stitched since 2nd grade. But when I had my first three children, I stopped stitching and life became exceedingly stressful. I fell into a horrible bout of post-partum anxiety after the third was born. As part of my recovery, I began to attend meetings of our local chapter of the Embroiderer’s Guild of America. It reminded me of the true contentment I feel from creating things with a needle in my hand. My husband could also see the effect.

Soon my fiber love branched into crochet. I had always crocheted but wasn’t very adventurous with it. Then I discovered a book of amigurumi patterns in the library. The embroidery section abuts the crochet books. Each toy I made was like Christmas for my kids. They still have and play with all those toys from 6 years ago. Crochet took off after that.

“After testing for a designer for a few years, I was encouraged to pursue technical editing. Finally, I feel tech editing combines the value of my educational background (BS, MS & Unfinished PhD in Range & Wildlife Management, strong data collection and manipulation skills, eye for detail) with my natural passions for fiber arts. I feel that I am finally serving God through my fiat (thus the business name), God’s will for my life. Why else would I have the combination of these great skills if not to serve and provide for my family?

Oh, and the answer to “how do you find the time?” is a loving and understanding husband, early bedtime for the kids, I tend to stitch fast because my time is limited. Neglect probably still plays a part, my home certainly isn’t the cleanest, but the kids are happy, clean and fed.

Show your support by following Emily on:

Fiat Fiber Arts Website | Facebook Page | Facebook Group | Instagram | Pinterest | Ravelry | YouTube


Tips and Tricks for Making Pompoms and Tassels

by Fiat Fiber Arts

Tips and Tricks for Making Pompoms and Tassels by Fiat Fiber Arts for Underground CrafterMaking pompoms is a craft that can add fun and whimsy to your designs and can also be a source of major frustration for some. Today, I will share with you my thoughts and what I have learned about making pompoms.

I used to hate making pompoms, but mostly that was because my pompoms were always flimsy, yucky looking things. I thought I was following instructions, but it just didn’t turn out right. Today, you can search for “how to make a pompom” on the internet and find loads of videos and project ideas. Even if you’re not a crochet or knit maker, you can make pompoms and use them in a variety of ways. Who’s seen the viral video of the pompom rug? Have you tried that one?

Pompoms

Here, I’ll go over the equipment and tools and my secrets (and secret annoyances) I have discovered about pompom making. If you want to just cut to the chase and watch some poms getting made by myself and my daughter, then check this out.

Special Equipment?

Do you need special tools to make a pompom? Not necessarily. There are pompom makers out there, interestingly shaped little devices that can help you in making pompoms that are different sizes. But, as seen in many videos, you can use a piece of cardboard also. I’ve also used a book or just my hand. If you want the special pompom makers, you can find them at your local craft store, but I found a set on wish. It’s pretty flimsy but it gets the job done. Some of the other bonuses to using the tool is that it has a groove designed for proper scissor cutting placement. It holds your cut pieces together while you get the tie piece in the same groove. PLUS, the little bumps help to hold that tying yarn tight while knotting.

The Yarn

If you want to be making pompoms fast, use bigger yarn. It’s the same as when you’re stitching: bigger yarn works up faster than smaller yarn. So, unless you just have to have a pompom in that dk or sock weight color, stick with weight 4 or larger yarns or you’re going to be wrapping all day long. Even with weight 4 yarn, I started to double and triple the strands to make it faster.

What’s the secret?

So, how did I go from hating pompoms because they were flimsy to making seriously solid pompoms capable for a rug? It’s all about your wraps. MAKE MORE WRAPS. Wrap that yarn around and around and around. The more wraps you make, the stuffier and sturdier your pompom will be. So, if your pompoms, like mine, are flimsy, make another and wrap it more.

Tips and Tricks for Making Pompoms and Tassels by Fiat Fiber Arts for Underground Crafter - pompoms

The Cutting

Since we’re cutting through several layers of yarn, you want the scissors sharp so that the job is easier. Thin scissors would be easier to slip further under the yarn. Also, don’t use those scissors that only cut in one spot where the blades meet, you know the ones. You need scissors that cut very well close to the tips. The thinner and sharper the blades, the less actual cuts will be needed. If you are making a big pom project you will be doing a lot of cutting. You want COMFORTABLE scissors! The first time I tried making the pom rug I quit after 5 poms because I was getting a blister or a bruise on my hand. Crafting injuries. So, take it easy or pay for some super sharp scissors.

The Middle Tie

After cutting your yarn around the card, book, or pompom maker, you need to get a center tie string around your loops BEFORE removing the pieces from your wrapping device. Usually I use the same type of yarn that I used to make the pompom. But you want to use something that can make a really tight knot without breaking. If you used super bulky yarn to make your pom, then maybe get some tough string or sewing thread for the tie. I like using upholstery thread for projects that need to stay for a long time. Upholstery thread is very durable and you can pull it super tight. If you have a cotton yarn that can be pulled to break, it’s not ideal for the knot. Usually, my acrylic weight 4 yarns are good for wrapping and tying. Also, make sure you leave a long tail for the tie. That’s what you will be using to attach the pom.

Tips and Tricks for Making Pompoms and Tassels by Fiat Fiber Arts for Underground Crafter - pompoms

Removal and Shaping

Honestly, along with cutting, this is my new annoyance for pompoms. Again, you’re using your scissors, so if your hand already hurt from cutting through all those wraps, here goes round 2. First, get over the trash can or a bowl or something to catch a bunch of tiny cut bits of yarn. Then, start trimming off the yarn ends that stand out from your pompom surface. This part feeds into my perfectionism in not the best way. I could trim forever, sometimes. Oh wait, this side is too flat, I can round it out here, that bit is sticking out, now that bit, and on and on. Eventually, you have to be happy about it. My big tip for shaping is SHAKING. After you do a couple cuts, shake that pom! Shake, shake, shake. It loosens the pieces and shows the true shape. Then evaluate for the next cut. Just cut a couple times and shake again. Move it around in your hand. Think about the average person looking at it, not a critical crafter’s eye like yours.

Attachment

Now you have a pompom ready for placement!! Usually you can use the long tail from the tie to attach the pom wherever you need it. Again, you probably want to attach it very tightly to wherever it’s going. If it’s topping a hat, you don’t want it flopping off. If it’s going on that rug, you want it firmly secured. Tassels and purse accents might give you a little more leeway but you’ll have to think about what you’re doing with it when you make that tie.

Tassels

Tassels are similar to pompoms. Making a tassel doesn’t necessarily need a tool. But you want your strands to be uniform in length. I’ve often used a hardback book to wrap yarn around and get equal lengths of yarn. You can also just measure out the length you want and cut and cut and cut and cut each length of yarn. However you do it, you want several lengths of yarn of roughly equal length.

Tips and Tricks for Making Pompoms and Tassels by Fiat Fiber Arts for Underground Crafter - tassels

The Ties

A tassel will have two ties in it. One tie will go around all lengths of yarn in the middle of them. All lengths will then fold down from this point. This tie is what you will use for attachment of the tassel. After making the center tie, pull all lengths down so that all ends are opposite the tie. Depending on your size of yarn, the next tie will be about a half to 1 inch down from the center tie. This tie will wrap around all strands. You want this one to be very tight because it’s giving the tassel it’s shape and will hold it together. The tails of this tie need to be as long or longer than the ends of the tassel.

Tips and Tricks for Making Pompoms and Tassels by Fiat Fiber Arts for Underground Crafter - tassels

Trimming

Your next step on tassel making is similar to the shaping of the pompom but way easier!! All you need to do is trim the ends of the lengths so you have a straight even cut across the bottom.

Attachment

Now you can attach your tassel using the top tie ends.

Pinterest is an amazing place to see other ideas for poms and tassels. Here’s my own Pinterest board of inspiration for tassels and purses.

I hope you have fun making your own pompoms and tassels. Let me know what you make!

© 2018 by Emily Reiter (Fiat Fiber Arts) and published with permission by Underground Crafter. This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the tutorial to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this tutorial. Do not violate Emily’s copyright by distributing this tutorial or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the tutorial, point your friends to this link: https://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2018/07/31/how-to-make-yarn-pompoms-and-tassels. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Thank you, Emily, for sharing this beautiful pattern with us! Show your support by visiting Emily at one of the following links:

Fiat Fiber Arts Website | Facebook Page | Facebook Group | Instagram | Pinterest | Ravelry | YouTube

Is Selling Your Handmade Items a Hobby or Business? by The Yarny Bookkeeper | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

Yarn in primary colors on a flat surface | Is Selling Your Handmade Items a Hobby or a Business? Guest Post by The Yarny Bookkeeper for Underground CrafterI’m so excited to introduce Nancy Smyth from The Yarny Bookkeeper. If you’ve ever thought about selling your handmade creations, you’ll want to read her guest post to find out how to figure out if you have a hobby or a business (and more importantly, how to make that distinction clear to the IRS!).

This post includes affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

About Nancy Smyth

Nancy Smyth is a yarn addict, a small business owner for 30+ years, a professional bookkeeper with an Associates Degree in Accounting, and a yarnpreneur with her own handmade business. Her goal as The Yarny Bookkeeper is to take her own experience and turn it into a resource for fellow handmade business owners, so that amazingly creative people like you can handle their bookkeeping with confidence!

Show your support by following Nancy on:

The Yarny Bookkeeper| Facebook Page | Facebook Group | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | YouTube | G+

xx

Is Selling Your Handmade Items a Hobby or a Business?

Guest Post by The Yarny Bookkeeper

Yarn in primary colors | Is Selling Your Handmade Items a Hobby or a Business? Guest Post by The Yarny Bookkeeper for Underground CrafterQuite often handmade businesses are lovingly nurtured on the side (for years) while we continue to work for someone else and get a steady paycheck. But be aware there IS a point when your “hobby” does become a business – at least as far as the IRS is concerned.

Just because you are currently selling handmade items doesn’t automatically mean you have a business. In reality, it all boils down to one simple thing (from the view of the IRS) — your intention to make a profit from selling your handmade items!

Knitting, crocheting, dying yarn, spinning yarn, quilting, sewing, making jewelry, designing knit or crochet patterns, glass blowing, catering, cupcake baking (and the list goes on and on) are all considered to be a “hobby” by the IRS and isn’t profitable, and with good reason the IRS doesn’t consider a hobby to be profitable because:

  • It’s something you do to relax
  • You make things that YOU like
  • You give most of your finished items as gifts or perhaps donate them to charity
  • You only have an occasional sale
  • Perhaps you sell your finished items for the cost of materials PLUS a couple of bucks for yourself

Now, even though the IRS doesn’t consider a hobby to be profitable, you are still EXPECTED to report any money that you do make from that occasional sale on your personal tax return (Form 1040) at the end of the year.

Calculator and pen with receipts | Is Selling Your Handmade Items a Hobby or a Business? Guest Post by The Yarny Bookkeeper for Underground CrafterOn the flip side you can also deduct hobby expenses – BUT only up to the amount that you claim in sales AND you must itemize your deductions on your tax return. As a quick example:

Let’s say you sold $1,000.00 worth of handcrafted items and spent $1,500.00 in materials, supplies and fees. As a hobby – you can ONLY deduct $1,000.00 (because that’s the amount you can claim in sales) and you must itemize your deductions using Schedule A when you file your tax return.

HINT: Talk to your CPA or tax preparer for more information.

BUT, as soon as you open an Etsy, Facebook, Ravelry, etc. shop and expect others to pay a fair market value for your finished objects, the IRS then considers you to be a handmade business – because you then intend to make a profit on the items you sell.

And that’s when EVERYTHING changes, and you need to step up your game.

Craft fair table display with softies | Is Selling Your Handmade Items a Hobby or a Business? Guest Post by The Yarny Bookkeeper for Underground CrafterFor most of us this will mean that in addition to filing our regular Form 1040 at the end of the year, we’ll be adding another form called a Schedule C – Profit or Loss From Business where we can legally deduct other expenses that are involved with running a business like the cost of patterns that we purchase, the cost of hosting a website, fees charged by PayPal, Etsy, Ravelry, etc., the cost of craft fair booths, business licenses, etc. So if we go back to our quick example – it’s quite likely that you can deduct the entire $1,500.00 that you spent. BUT you have to be really good about tracking income & expenses – and that means bookkeeping!

Again, talk to your CPA or tax preparer for more information.

It doesn’t matter (initially) if your sales are slow. The determining factor from the standpoint of the IRS – you are a business if you are selling your finished object for a price that would:

  • cover the cost of the materials you used to make the object
  • cover any overhead involved in running the business, and
  • have some cash left over (the profit)

And that:

  • you conduct yourself in a businesslike manner
  • that the time and effort you put into the business indicate you intend to make it profitable
  • you depend on income from the business for your livelihood

Here is a list (right off the top of my head), based on my own experience of things you need to think about and do BEFORE starting a handmade business:

  • Lay your foundation – what are you going to sell
  • Find your niche
  • Create a business plan
  • Figure out what you need for startup money (businesses cost money)
  • Learn about pricing to make a profit
  • Get everyone on board (especially your family)
  • Figure out where you are going to sell
  • How will you collect money?
  • Business name
  • Business website
  • Business domain name
  • Choose a legal/tax structure
  • Get an FEIN/EIN (Federal Employer Identification Number)
  • Get Federal, State and/or Local business licenses, permits, Sales Tax accounts
  • Will you need business insurance?
  • Do you need Trademarks or Copyrights?
  • Set up business bank accounts
  • Bookkeeping
  • Branding – business cards, hang tags, packaging, etc.
  • Advertising – social media and an elevator pitch

There is a lot of information on the web about starting a handmade business – some make it sound so simple – make sure you are well informed and while it’s too late to have any impact on your 2017 tax return, it’s a good time to start planning for this year.

Visit The Yarn Bookkeeper for relevant tips on bookkeeping for your handmade business.

© 2018 by Nancy Smyth (The Yarny Bookkeeper) and published with permission by Underground Crafter. Do not violate Nancy’s copyright by distributing this post or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the post, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2018/01/30/is-selling-your-handmade-items-a-hobby-or-business. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.In today’s #TipsTuesday post, I’m going to show you how to make your own felted balls from wool yarn. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects. (Spoiler alert: I’ll be sharing a project using felted balls later this week, so you may want to get started on making a set.)

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Gather your materials.

You’ll need 100% wool yarn (I used Lion Brand Alpine Wool in Chili and Lion Brand LB Collection Pure Wool yarn), stockings, and access to a washer and dryer.

Wind your yarn balls.

First, you’ll wrap the yarn around your fingers several times.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.

Then, slide the yarn off your fingers and begin wrapping yarn around the center.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Fold over the yarn and continue to wrap until it forms an irregular sphere.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Once you have a sphere, continue wrapping in different directions until you have normalized the shape.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.For dryer balls, you’ll want to make the balls several inches large in diameter. I recommend using undyed yarn for best results. For craft projects, you’ll want smaller balls that are less than an inch in diameter.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Prepare your yarn balls for felting.

Once you have as many balls as you’d like (or you’ve run out of yarn), begin stuffing them into the stocking towards the foot. Tie a knot after each ball.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Felt your yarn balls.

You’ll want to wash your tied yarn balls on hot in a lightly filled load of laundry for maximum agitation. I washed them with denims and sheets, but not with towels or other yarn projects that would generate a lot of lint. After washing, you’ll want to tumble dry these on high. I actually put these in the washer and dryer a few times to make sure they felted completely. Once your balls are felted, little fuzzies will stick out of the stockings.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.At that point, you can release your felted balls by cutting off the knot and sliding out the next felted ball and continuing until they are all released from the stocking.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.You now have your very own collection of felted balls! What will you use yours for?

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

As the weather starts cooling down and we head into winter, many crocheters and knitters start ramping up their projects. If you’ve vowed that this is the year where you will wear your own handmade creations rather than store bought, let me share 4 tips for planning a season’s worth of wearable accessories. Oh, and in case that isn’t enough to get you inspired, I’ve also included a roundup of 36 free crochet and knitting patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags! Read on for more tips so you can DIY.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Photos are copyright the respective designer/publisher and are used with permission.

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories

1) Be real about your clothing

As you think ahead to the next season, consider your own wardrobe staples. What outfits, colors, and styles do you actually wear on a regular basis? If your style is eclectic, that’s wonderful! But, if you know you’ll probably wear the same t-shirt and pair of jeans every Saturday, don’t imagine you’ll suddenly be wearing ballerina dresses this winter instead.

On the other hand, if you’ve recently lost or gained weight, switched jobs, or have had other life changes that mean it’s time to go clothes shopping, consider building some outfits around special accessories that you’d love to wear on a regular basis.

Once you have an idea of what you’ll be wearing in the next season, you can choose accessories projects to wear with those outfits.

2) Select projects

With your clothing in mind, look through patterns and choose accessories that will fit in with your lifestyle and your local climate. Some options for wearable accessories include socks, hats, scarves or cowls, shawls, and bags. (At the end of these tips, you can find 36 great pattern suggestions to get you started!) Once you have your projects chosen, you can start a shopping list of yarn and supplies you’ll need.

3) Choose colors carefully

To get the most wear out of your new handmade accessories collection, choose colors that compliment or contrast the staples in your wardrobe. While it’s tempting to choose neutral colors that (theoretically) match everything, if you prefer bold vibrant colors, this is not a good strategy. Think about not just the actual colors you like, but the type of color. Do you like bold colors or ones that are more faded? Are you a fan of jewel tones or pastels or earth tones? Do you like your outfits to coordinate or would you prefer your accessories to add a pop of color to the rest of what you’re wearing? Do you want your accessories to be solid, or would you prefer stripes, multicolor yarns, or color blocked projects?

If you’d like your handmade accessories to follow seasonal fashion trends, take a look at the latest Pantone fashion color report, which is usually available about six months in advance. Once you have a better idea of the types of colors you want to wear, you can start matching projects to yarn.

4) Start early

If you want to get the most use out of your accessories during the season, start crocheting and knitting as early as possible. This allows you to work at a reasonable pace and still finish in time to wear your creations. If you can’t get started early, or life just gets too busy, aim to finish one versatile project that you can get a lot of wear out of during the season.

Crochet Scarves

36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns for Wearable Accessories

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Now that you have a plan for making your own seasonal accessories collection, here are 36 free crochet and knitting pattern suggestions to help inspire you to get started for the fall and winter!

Socks (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Hats (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Scarves and Cowls (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Shawls and Wraps (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Bags (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

If you enjoyed this roundup, you can find 50 more ideas for handmade scarves and cowls here!