Crochet Pattern: Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf

Free crochet pattern: Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf in madelinetosh Prairie by Underground Crafter | This simple lace shawl is a perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. It also makes a great, lightweight scarf for the colder weatherI’m sharing a beginner-friendly crochet pattern today. (For all you crochet pros out there, this makes a good “tv project,” too.) The Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf uses a very simple lace pattern to make the perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. This project can also be worn as a lightweight triangular scarf for the colder weather. I love wearing lace yarn scarves because they fit neatly under my coat when I want to protect my neck from the wind.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. A sample of The Yarnit Mr. Sparkles was provided to me by The YarnIt. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Last May, I bought a skein of madelinetosh Prairie on sale at my local yarn shop, Knitty City. (If you’re visiting New York, I recommend you check out Knitty City, along with the other shops in my Visitor’s Guide to NYC Yarn Shops.)

Free crochet pattern: Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf in madelinetosh Prairie by Underground Crafter | This simple lace shawl is a perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. It also makes a great, lightweight scarf for the colder weatherIt sat around for a while until inspiration struck. But, as often happens, inspiration struck at a time when it wasn’t all that convenient to be traveling around with a skein of lace yarn. Enter The YarnIt. If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen this review of The YarnIt a few months ago.

Last summer, I was introduced to the team at @theyarnit and was given a Mr. Sparkles #yarnit to try out. It has been invaluable in keeping my @madelinetosh Prairie lace #yarn from tangling. I’ve been worked on this #crochet lace shawl on the subway, on the bus, during a 2-hour meeting in an auditorium (where it was stowed under my seat), and at home on the couch with a frisky cat on my shoulder. The yarn feeds easily through the porthole and the globe’s material has survived several drops, too. I’m definitely going to be using the YarnIt to keep my future lace and sock yarn projects from getting tangled as I switch bags and locations. #IGotItFree #crocheting #crochetersofinstagram #instacrochet #madelinetosh

A post shared by Marie @ Underground Crafter (@ucrafter) on

If you’re new to The YarnIt, it’s a cross between a yarn bowl and a carrying case for your yarn. (Oh, and a protector from cats, as you can see in the short video below.)

The YarnIt came in very handy during my travels around town with this yarn. It fits nicely into pretty much every purse or project bag I have, and I can also lay it flat on the table and work from it directly. As you can tell from my Instagram picture, I don’t use the straps with mine. It seemed more practical for my crochet lifestyle without them. You can get The YarnIt on Amazon in a variety of colors.


So, back to the pattern for the Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf! As I mentioned, I am a huge fan of triangular shawls. I get the most wear out of ones with an isosceles, rather than equilateral, shape. (If you need a geometry refresher on triangle anatomy, Math is Fun is a helpful source.) These shawls are easy to tie and can be worn as shawls or scarves, so there are more styling options. Here are few other free crochet patterns for shawls with the same shape, if you decide to add more to your collection! Click on the image to go to the pattern.

Rainbow After the Storm Shawlette, free #crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter in Bonita Yarns Kaleidoscopic.

A Cold Snap Shawlette, free #crochet pattern by Underground Crafter | This simple shawlette recipe can be customized to your preferred size (or, to use up just the right amount of yarn!). This shawlette is perfect for accessorizing, keeping you cozy when it gets suddenly cold, or protecting your neck in air conditioning. The self-patterning yarn does all the colorwork for you.

Tina's Day-to-Night Shawl, free crochet pattern in Wool and the Gang Tina Tape yarn by Underground Crafter | This easy-to-make, large shawl transitions seamlessly from day-to-night with you. It’s perfect for wearing to work, with jeans, or when dressed up for a night out. The tencel yarn creates excellent drape.If you make your own Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter. You can also share a picture in the Underground Crafters Facebook group. Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a coupon code for your choice of one of my premium patterns and other subscriber goodies. Plus, you’ll never miss one of my free patterns again!

Add the Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf to your Ravelry favorites or queue.

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If you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

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Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

Free crochet pattern: Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf in madelinetosh Prairie by Underground Crafter | This simple lace shawl is a perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. It also makes a great, lightweight scarf for the colder weather

This simple lace shawl is a perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. Wear it as a lightweight triangular scarf in colder weather.

 

Finished Size

  • Adult: 63” (160 cm) wingspan x 8.25” (21 cm) spine before blocking; 67.5” (171.5 cm) wingspan x 9” (23 cm) spine after blocking.

Materials

  • madelinetosh Prairie yarn (100% Merino wool, 840 yd/768 m) – 1 skein in Holi Festival, or approximately 525 yd (480 m) in any lace weight yarn.
  • US SizeD-3/3.25 mm crochet hook, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn needle.
  • 3 locking stitch markers.

Gauge

  • 26 dc = 4” (10 cm) across before blocking. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • dc2tog – double crochet 2 stitches together – (Yo, insert hook in next st, yo and draw up a loop, yo and draw through 2 loops) twice, yo and drawn through all 3 loops on hook.
  • dc4tog – double crochet 4 stitches together – *Yo, insert hook in next st, yo and draw up a loop, yo and draw through 2 loops; rep from * 3 more times, yo and draw through all 5 loops on hook.
  • ea – each
  • rep – repeat
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sp – space
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • yo – yarn over
  • * Repeat instructions after asterisk as indicated.

Pattern Notes

Pattern Instructions

Shawl

Shape endpoint

  • Ch 3.
  • Row 1: Turn, sk 2 ch, 3 dc in next ch, place marker 1 in same ch to mark point. (3 sts)
  • Row 2: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and next st, 2 dc in next st. (4 sts)
  • Row 3: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and ea st across.
  • Row 4: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st, ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st, ch 1, dc in next st. (5 sts)

Increase towards midpoint

  • Row 5: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and in ea ch-1 sp and dc across.
  • Row 6: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and in ea st across to last, 2 dc in last st. (Increase by 1 st to even count)
  • Row 7: Rep Row 3.
  • Row 8: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st, *ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st; rep from * across to last st, ch 1, dc in same st. (Increase by 1 st to odd count)
  • Rep Rows 5-8 until shawl measures approximately 30” (76 cm), or about just under half of desired unblocked length, ending after Row 8.

Shape midpoint

  • Row 9: Rep Row 5
  • Row 10: Rep Row 3, place marker 2 in last st to mark midpoint.
  • Row 11: Rep Row 3.
  • Row 12: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st, *ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st; rep from * across.

Decrease to endpoint

  • Row 13: Rep Row 5.
  • Row 14: Ch 2, dc in same st and ea st across to last 2 sts, dc2tog. (Decrease by 1 st to even count)
  • Row 15: Rep Row 3.
  • Row 16: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st, *ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st; rep from * across to last 3 sts, ch 1, sk 2 sts, dc in next st. (Decrease by 1 st to odd count)
  • Rep Rows 13-16 until only 5 sts remain, ending after Row 16.

Shape endpoint

  • Row 17: Rep Row 5.
  • Row 18: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and next 2 sts, dc2tog.
  • Row 19: Turn, ch 2, dc4tog, place marker 3 at top of dc4tog to mark endpoint. Do not fasten off.

Border

  • Turn to work along angled edge. Move marker up ea row.
  • Row 1: (Right Side) Ch 1, sc in marked st, 3 sc in side of ea row across to marker 2, (2 sc, ch 2, 2 sc) in side of marked row, move marker 2 to ch-2 sp, 3 sc in side of ea row across to marker 1, sc in marked st. (Mult of 3 sts + ch-2 sp)
  • Row 2: Turn, ch 3 (counts as dc), *dc in next st, ch 2, sk 2 sts;** rep from * across to ch 2 sp, (dc, ch 3, dc, ch 2) in ch-2 sp, move up marker 2 to ch-3 sp, sk 2 sts, rep from * to ** across to last 2 sts, dc in next 2 sts.
  • Row 3: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st, *sc in next st, 2 sc in ch-2 sp;** rep from * across to st before ch-3 sp, sc in next st, (2 sc, ch 1, 2 sc) in ch-3 sp, rep from * to ** across to last 2 sts, sc in next 2 sts. Fasten off.

Finishing

© 2017 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2017/09/12/crochet-pattern-simple-lace-isosceles-shawl-or-scarf. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

If you make your own Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter. You can also share a picture in the Underground Crafters Facebook group. Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a coupon code for your choice of one of my premium patterns and other subscriber goodies. Plus, you’ll never miss one of my free patterns again!

Add the Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf to your Ravelry favorites or queue.

Underground Crafter on Ravelry

If you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Underground Crafter on Craftsy

 

Crochet Pattern: Justine Shawl

Justine Shawl, free #crochet pattern by Underground CrafterThis post contains affiliate links. Yarn for the sample was generously provided by Malabrigo.

Last year, I fell in love with a skein of Malabrigo Sock at my local yarn shop, Knitty City. That yarn was eventually transformed into the Picnic Basket Shawl, and when I reached out to Malabrigo, they agreed to sponsor the crochet-a-long with some great prizes.
And, they added a little prize into the box for me, too.

Justine Shawl, free #crochet pattern by Underground CrafterOnce I had this beautiful Malabrigo Lace in my hands, I knew it was going to be another shawl. It just took me a few months to figure out what shawl it was meant to be.

Justine Shawl free crochet pattern by Underground Crafter 2The Justine Shawl (named after my sister, who I gifted the sample to) is a variation on the Ella’s Rhythm Shawl. Like Ella’s Rhythm, it’s a “recipe” style pattern. You can use your favorite crochet hook and work this pattern until it reaches your preferred size. (I happen to think it looks perfect in the Malabrigo Lace, though!)

Justine Shawl, free #crochet pattern by Underground CrafterThis is a beginner-friendly pattern using simple stitches but an unusual construction. If you find the pattern confusing, you may want to check out the video tutorial for the Ella’s Rhythm Shawl (at the end of the pattern) because this is constructed the same way.

If you make one, don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or Facebook.

Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy the ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Click to buy the ad-free PDF version of this @ucrafter pattern on Craftsy

Hookin on Hump Day
Featured Five Club

ILC 300x250b April 2016

Justine Shawl

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

02-easy 50US terms 500-laceAn easy stitch pattern and an unusual construction create an adjustable, lacy shawl.

 

Finished Size

  • Adjustable. Photographed sample measures 50” (127 cm) wingspan x 27” (65.5 cm) spine after blocking.

Materials

  • Malabrigo Lace (100% Merino wool, 1.75 oz/50 g, 470 yd/430 m) – 2 skeins in 21 Cactus Flowers, or approximately 940 yds (860 m) in any lace weight yarn.
  • US C-2/2.75 mm crochet hook, or any size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn needle.

Gauge

  • 30 sts x 13 rows in pattern = 4” (10 cm) unblocked. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Interweave Store

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • ea – each
  • rep – repeat
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • sp – space
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • * Rep instructions after asterisk as indicated.

Pattern Notes

  • Shawl is worked from top edge to corner point.
  • If you find the construction confusing, watch the tutorial for the Ella’s Rhythm Shawl (which uses the same construction method) at the end of the pattern.


Pattern Instructions

Shawl

  • Ch 4.
  • Row 1: Turn, sk 3 ch (counts as dc), (2 dc, ch 1, 3 dc) in next ch.
  • Row 2: Turn, ch 5 (counts as dc, plus ch-2 sp, here and throughout), sk next 2 sts, (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc) in ch-1 sp.
  • Row 3: Turn, ch 1, sk first st, sl st in next 2 sts and in ch-1 sp, ch 3 (counts as dc, here and throughout), (2 dc, ch 1, 3 dc) in same ch-1 sp, dc in next 3 sts, 2 dc in ch-2 sp, dc in third ch of t-ch.
  • Row 4: Turn, ch 5, sk 2 sts, *dc in next dc, ch 2, sk 2; rep from * across to ch-1 sp, (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc) in ch-1 sp.
  • Row 5: Turn, ch 1, sk first st, sl st in next 2 sts and in ch-1 sp, ch 3, (2 dc, ch 1, 3 dc) in same ch-1 sp, dc in next 3 sts, *2 dc in ch-2 sp, dc in next st; rep from * across, ending with dc in third ch of t-ch.
  • Rep Rows 4-5 until straight edge measures approximately 50” (127 cm), or until desired length is reached. Do not fasten off.

 Border

  • Row 1: Turning to work along side, ch 2, 3 dc in side of ch-sp, *2 dc in side of next dc, 2 dc in side of ch-sp; rep from * across to first row, 2 dc in side of dc from first shell, dc in first ch-1 sp. Fasten off.

Finishing

© 2016 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2016/03/01/free-pattern-justine-shawl/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

If you make one, don’t forget to share a picture on Ravelry or Facebook.

Add to RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy the ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

If you find the construction for the Justine Shawl confusing, watch the tutorial for the Ella’s Rhythm Shawl (which uses the same construction method) below.

Temperature Cowl for Mom

In 2013, I had a great time crocheting my temperature scarf, and having a 365 row scarf certainly came in handy during the brutal cold of January and February.

blog Temperature scarf folded flatIf you’re new to the temperature scarf phenomenon, it’s a conceptual project where you link a particular colorway to a set of temperatures, and then allow the weather to dictate your striping pattern. (You can find my free temperature scarf crochet pattern here.)

I promised my mom that I’d make her a temperature scarf before this winter. The catch was she only wanted to include the dates between my sister’s birthday and her birthday. (My birthday happens to be in the middle of theirs.) So, instead I decided to make a cowl.

Last weekend, I picked up some cozy and monochrome yarns from Frog Tree Alpaca that I thought would be perfect at Knitty City during the New York City Yarn Crawl.

FrogTreeAlpaca

Earlier this week, I looked through the weather from December 20, 2013 through February 23, 2014.

TempScarftracking I assigned the colors and charted out the striping pattern.

TempScarfdetailsNow, I just need to pick out a stitch pattern. I’m thinking this may be a knit version, with cables. I know my mom likes cables, but I’m not sure which stitch pattern might look best with frequent color changes. I guess I’ll get swatching!

Vogue Knitting Live 2014: Day 2

VKL NYNY

This post contains affiliate links.

My second day at Vogue Knitting Live started off with no hot water at home (and who doesn’t love showering in cold water when it’s sleeting outside?).  In the rush to get out the door, I forgot to take the ceremonial pre-show picture of me in my handmade goodies.  (I was wearing my 2013 Temperature Scarf, which is perfect for cold weather.)

My first stop was an interview with the delightful Kate Atherley from Wise Hilda.  I should be posting it in a few weeks.  I asked her to pose with her two books, Beyond Knit & Purl and Knit Accessories.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Kate Atherley

Then I walked through the fashion and art exhibits.  I’m planning a separate post about these, so I’m sharing just one picture today.  This is a crocheted piece by fashion designer, Gabriela Serigatto.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Gabriela Sarigatto2

My next stop was the Marketplace.  I learned a lot from Rosemary Drysdale‘s Entrelac: The Essential Guide to Interlace Knitting, and she was signing books at the Vogue Knitting booth.

VKL NYC 2014 Rosemary Drysdale Autograph

From there, I snuck over to the Leilani Arts table.  You see, they sell this Soft Donegal yarn, which has become the favorite amongst the men in family: soft but charcoal (with a little tweed to keep my interest).

VKL NYC 2014 Studio Donegal

I promised my dad I’d make him a version of this cabled hat, so I needed another skein.  Melissa Leapman rung up my sale.

Then, I went to the Knitty City booth (it’s always a treat to see your favorite local yarn shop at an event) to get my copy of Knitwear Design Workshop: A Comprehensive Guide to Handknits signed by Shirley Paden.

VKL NYC 2014 Shirley Paden autograph

Shirley was really quite friendly and we had a nice chat about her class on Craftsy, which is a companion to the book, as well as the We Love Shirley Paden group on Ravelry.  (Shirley assures me she didn’t name the group!)  The group sounds like a lot of fun and they have even hosted three Design-a-Longs.

I had a few minutes after the book signing to watch the beginning of the Fiber Factor Fashion show.  I learned there will be KALs throughout 2014 and the next “season” will begin in 2015, but I missed the announcement of the winner.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Fiber Factor Rachel Henry Gates of Dawn

This stunning felted dress, Gates of Dawn by Rachel Henry, was one of my favorite Fiber Factor projects on display.

Believe it or not, I had time for two more quick stops before reaching my final VK Live destination.  I took a picture of Virginia from Yellowfarm (interviewed here), who I met at last year’s event.

blog VKL NYC 2014 YellowFarm Virginia

And, then I visited the Full Moon Farm booth, to snap a picture of Laura.  My interview with her will be coming up soon.  We met last year, too.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Full Moon Farm Laura

And then I headed off to the Michelle’s Assortment booth.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Michelle's Assortment Michelle

I helped out in Michelle’s booth for a few hours in the afternoon, so she could stretch her legs and walk around the Marketplace for a bit.  It was a great opportunity to learn more about her creative process.  She’s sponsoring two months of prizes for my 2014 Sampler Mystery Knit-a-Long, so it was great to meet her in real life and see all of her awesome shawl pins, bookmarks, and stitch markers.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Michelle's Assortment circles

I particularly like Michelle’s round shawl pins.  It was also great to see her collaboration with other indie business owners.  Michelle had several samples from Ash Kearns on display to show off her shawl pins including Havelock (left) and Everton Lace Wrap (right), along with the print versions of the patterns.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Michelle's Assortment Ash Kearns samples

Of course, I couldn’t spend all that time in Michelle’s booth without falling in love with some shawl pins.  I was initially drawn in by the circles, I ended up choosing two straight pins for myself.

blog VKL NYC 2014 Michelle's Assortment goodies

These will definitely need to be re-shot in natural lighting because you can’t see the beauty in this picture.  I’m off to get some rest before Day 3!

2013 Temperature Scarf: Lessons Learned

I’m excited to say that I did finish crocheting my temperature scarf this week.  The 113 remaining rows just flew by.

blog Temperature scarf folded roll

I ended up using 8 different colorways for this project.

Temperature Scarf Yarn Collage

 

Four of the skeins (Dream in Color Classy in Spring Tickle and Happy Forest and madelinetosh tosh vintage in Fragrant and Cove) were purchased at my favorite local yarn shop, Knitty City; two others (Miss Babs Yowza–Whatta Skein! in Violets in the Grass and madelinetosh tosh vintage in Midnight in Manhattan) were picked up at another local yarn shop, The Yarn Company; and I bought the two remaining skeins (Molly Girl Chart Topper in Anastasia and Aella) from a local dyer at the North Jersey Fiber Arts Festival.

2013 Temperature Scarf outline

My original plan called for the use of just 7 yarns, but since 24% of the year’s dates fell into the same temperature range, I ended up running out of yarn for one of the temperature ranges and adding another yarn.

Since I was crocheting at a significant lag (I recorded the temperatures throughout the year, but ended up crocheting most of the scarf after November), I was able to make a substitution.  If I were to make another temperature scarf, I’d use a shorter range of temperatures, perhaps 8 degrees for each color.

blog Temperature scarf folded detail

Of course, this would mean that some colors wouldn’t be used at all.  As it stands, the Spring Tickle (representing the coldest temperature range) was only used for two rows.

One thing I’m happy I didn’t do was assign colors based on their association to the temperature.  Many of the temperature scarves I’ve seen use blues for lower temperatures and reds for higher temperatures, for example.  I just arranged my colorways in an order that was pleasing to my eye when I first started this project, and then assigned the temperatures in that order.

blog Temperature scarf folded flat

Another thing I would do differently (though I LOVE how the Violets in the Grass colorway looks in this scarf) would be to only use yarns with a very similar thickness.  The Miss Babs yarn is much thinner than the rest, and I used a larger hook for those rows to keep the gauge similar.

Now that the scarf is blocked, I’d really like to add some buttons.

blog Temperature scarf folded top

 

The stitch pattern I’ve used for this scarf sort of naturally forms a row of button holes at the edge.  But with all of these colors, it’s hard to pick a good set of buttons.  Naturally, I dug through my collection first.

blog Temperature scarf button ideas

I’m leaning towards using the blue square buttons at the top left and maybe the black and white polka dots.  I don’t want to seal this up permanently as an infinity cowl/circle scarf, but I think I’m less likely to wear it as a scarf, so buttons seemed the perfect solution.

Or, should I just go out and try to find buttons specifically for this project?  What do you think?

Overall, I really enjoyed my first conceptual crochet project. It was interesting to give away control of the striping and to create a project that I absolutely couldn’t have imagined at the beginning.  I think my next conceptual crochet project will be a blanket of some kind – but that’s not until I work through more of my remaining stash!

And, on that note, I’m pleased to say that I used up 873 yards of yarn with this project.  My scarf measures about 8.5″ (21.5 cm) by 79″ (200.5 cm), which is pretty long for me since I’m only 5’3″ (1.6 m).  It’s gorgeous though, and perfect for the next cold spell.