Vintage Needlecrafts Pick of the Week: Tricot Crochet by Rebecca Jones

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This week’s pick: Tricot Crochet: The Complete Book by Rebecca Jones.

Source: Lacis Museum of Lace and Textiles.

Publication date: 2000 US reprint of a 1991 Australian publication.

Status: Available online ($22 at Lacis, or $80 on Amazon).

Condition: Excellent.

Craft: Tunisian Crochet.

 

Tricot Crochet cover

I reviewed this book before, but I felt it needed another look as a vintage book.  It is delightfully quirky, in a self-published prior to 2005 kind of way.

The book’s subtitle is “Everything you wanted to know about this cross between knitting and crochet which has been given such common names as Afghan Crochet, Scotch Knitting, Fool’s Knitting and Shepherd’s Knitting.”  And it definitely covers a lot of ground.

For example, Rebecca shares some of her favorite vintage crochet ads.

Tricot Crochet  vintage ads

She also includes cute stick figure drawings to explain different concepts.

Tips for fitting a sweater.
Tips for fitting a sweater.

She shares a sizable stitch guide.

Tricot Crochet stitchesMost of the book is in black and white, but you do get to marvel at the color pictures in a few sections.

Tricot Crochet cat pillows

I suspect Rebecca is a cat lover…

Tricot Crochet color sweaters

With the revitalized interest in Tunisian crochet in the past several years, this book may not seem as critical.  But I applaud Rebecca Jones for putting together this book when she did, and for sharing her love of Tunisian crochet and her sense of whimsy with all of us!

Vintage Needlecrafts Pick of the Week: The Harmony Guide to 100’s More Crochet Stitches

This week’s pick:The Harmony Guide to 100’s More Crochet Stitches (Harmony guides)

Source: Lacis Museum of Lace and Textiles online store

Publication date: 1992

Status: Out of print.  Available online with prices ranging from “reasonable” to “apply for a line of credit.”

Condition: Very good

Craft(s): Crochet and Tunisian crochet

I previously reviewed this book as part of a compilation of over 20 crochet stitch guides here.  But there are a few things that make it stand out for me.

There’s a nice section on Irish crochet, which seems to be coming back into popularity.  There is an intro and slightly over a page of illustrated instructions for padding threads, working into base stitches, and making Clones knots.  There are also 7 patterns for stitches worked flat, 7 small motif patterns, 11 larger motif patterns, and a curlicue pattern.

All of the patterns in the book, including the Tunisian crochet patterns, are both written and charted.  This is the earliest English language book in my collection that uses international stitch symbols.  (You can see the Tunisian crochet bobble symbol in the description above.)

The book shows its age primarily through the photographs.  Apparently, it used to be fashionable to photograph stitches against black backgrounds.  Today, white seems to be more popular.

I’ve been spoiled by my vintage Harmony Guides.  I now expect all stitch guides to start with illustrated sections on all the techniques used in the books.  This book starts with 7 pages of introduction and then leads into six types of patterns: All-over Patterns, Filet Crochet, Motifs, Irish Style Crochet, Edgings and Trimmings, and Afghan (Tunisian Crochet).  Every section, except for the All-over Patterns and the Edgings and Trimmings, also includes about a page of illustrated instructions.

They don’t make ’em like they used to!

 

Year of Projects: Crochet Master Class – Bullion stitch blocks, week 1

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This post is part of my Year of Projects: Crochet Master Class series. You can read the other posts in this series here.

With my woven crochet clutch finished, I was ready to embark on a new chapter in Crochet Master Class.  I had the desire for texture, so I moved on to the bullion stitch chapter, which features crochet master Bonnie Pierce.  Bonnie learned the bullion stitch about 30 years ago when she decided to use a vintage pattern (with over 100 bullions) to make a Christening gown for her daughter.  After that, she saw that there was a lack of bullion patterns so she began to write her own.  Bonnie’s website links to 25 of her free square patterns, and she also sells some of her books, patterns, and bullion crochet hooks here.

I first experimented with the bullion stitch in 2006-7, when I crocheted this hat.

This hat is made with TLC Heathers yarn that I purchased on my very first trip to Smiley’s in Queens!

Since that hat, I haven’t done much with bullions.  If you aren’t familiar with the bullion stitch, check out this YouTube tutorial by Margaret Hubert (which I learned about when I took her freeform class last year).

For some reason, this week I had a great need to “kill three birds with one stone.”  So I tried to pick a bullion project that I could also make from my own stash and for charity.  After a bit of searching on Ravelry, I came across several bullion stitch blocks by Donna Kay Lacey.  I started with the Poppy Bullion Block.

The sun glare on the white washes out some detail on this “in progress” picture.
Here’s the finished block. I assure you that the wonky sides are not a design feature. Let’s just say you shouldn’t try to read a complex pattern while crocheting on the subway if you are aiming for perfection.

I really enjoyed the pattern.  A lot of crochet square patterns are pretty predictable, but this one kept me guessing – in a good way.  I’m planning to make at least a few more of these blocks before moving on to my next bullion stitch pattern.

This block will eventually end up going to Heartmade Blessings as part of the March 2012 Crochetlist charity challenge.  I’ll have to add a few more rounds to bring it up to 12″.

In other bullion news, I started to check out bullion crochet hooks on Lacis and Etsy (Sistermaide listing here).  If I’m still feeling excited about this stitch in another 30 days, I may even buy one.

For more Year of Projects posts, visit When Did I Become A Knitter.