Sewing Project: Heart Softie

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground CrafterI’m kicking off the Little Gifts Sew Along with the Heart Softie, a quick sewing project that makes a delightful gift year round. I’ve included different options for customizing it for the recipient, so read on for details.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. My sewing machine sponsor is Baby Lock. Additional materials for this post were generously provided by Fairfield World, Fiskars, and Plaid.

The Heart Softie is a cute little project that you can customize in several ways. First, choose how you will decorate the face.

  • Use safety eyes, a craft nose, and embroidered mouth, or
  • Use fabric paint to customize the facial expressions, or
  • Embroider all the facial features.

You can also customize the stuffing.

  • Make flat facial features with paint or embroidery and stuff with Fairfield Poly-Fil to make a pin cushion.This makes a great gift for the sewists or quilters in your life.

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - Heart Softie as pin cushion

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - Heart Softie on tableAre you just hearing about the Little Gifts Sew Along? Get all the details here.

  • You can join in by sewing the projects as you have time.
  • Share your progress and post pictures of your finished projects. Tag your projects and posts #sewlittlegifts and #stockingstuffersal on all social media.
  • If you’d like to chat with other sewists, join the Underground Crafters Facebook group.
  • By the end of the SAL, you’ll have up to 25 handmade gifts.
  • Use the button below on social media. Right click (on desktop) or tap and hold (on mobile) to save.

Little Gifts Sew Along 2019 with Underground Crafter

Fat Quarter Shop Daily Flash Sale

Heart Softie

Sewing Project by Underground Crafter

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground CrafterThe Heart Softie sews up quickly and can be used to cuddle, or as a pin cushion, sachet, or paper weight. It also makes a great gift for your special Valentine. You’ll spend more time customizing the face than you will sewing and stuffing. This is the first of 25 free sewing projects by 12 bloggers in the Little Gifts Sew Along.

Materials

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - fat quarter bundle

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - supplies with sewing machine

Instructions

Prepare fabric

  • Print the Heart Softie pattern and cut out around dotted lines.
  • Iron your fabric.
  • Fold the fabric over and position with the pattern on top. Iron the fabric again on the folds (so that you can cut through 2 layers for each Heart Softie) and pin the pattern through the layers.

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - pattern on fabric ready to cut

  • Cut out the pattern.
  • If you will be using safety eyes and craft nose, cut 3 small pieces of felt to use as backing (Shiny Happy World has a photo tutorial here).

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - pattern with felt pieces

Decorate facial features

  • Use paint to decorate face, using pattern as a guide. Wait for fabric paint to set as instructed on bottle.

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - paint supplies for facial features

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - heart faces with pattern

Sew heart together

  • Position heart with facial features face down onto other heart.

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - sewing with Baby Lock Jubilant

  • Using your sewing machine or hand sewing needle, and a 1/2″ (1 cm) seam allowance, sew around the heart, leaving the bottom point and about 1” (2 cm) on each side of the bottom point unsewn. Since you will be stuffing the Softie, be sure to back stitch to make the seams more durable.
  • Trim the thread tails so they don’t snag on the stuffing. Turn the Softie right side out.
  • Stuff firmly with your chosen stuffing. See notes before the tutorial for options.
  • Once your Softie is full enough, sew the last seam closed by hand. Start with the thread knot on the inside of the Softie so it will be hidden. Then fold the raw edges towards the inside so the seam allowance will be similar to the rest of your Softie. Sew along the edge. Back stitch to finish and then draw the needle through the inside of the Softie. Trim the thread on the outer edge so the thread tail recedes into the inside.

Heart Softie free sewing pattern by Underground Crafter - Heart Softie on faux fur background

© 2019 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: https://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2019/01/08/sewing-project-heart-softie/. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Giveaway: Plaid Bucilla and By Hand Inspiration!

Enter through August 30, 2017 for your chance to win an issue of By Hand Lookbook No. 2 and five Plaid Bucilla stitchable, counted cross stitch, and stamped embroidery kits from Underground CrafterWe’re heading into fall and today’s giveaway is filled with inspiration for the official arrival of holiday crafting season. I’m sharing my thoughts on a new fiber arts serial publication and several needlework kits that would make great gifts (as in, you could give them as gifts or use them to make gifts!).

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Materials for this post were generously provided by Plaid and By Hand.

Plaid Bucilla kits

I learned to embroider from my grandmother and I love the look of embroidery and other needlework, but admit that I no longer have the eyesight (nor the patience) to do it often. For this reason, I was very excited to get my hands on these kits from Plaid Bucilla.

If you don’t do needlework on the regular but you like to pick it up from time to time, these kits are perfect because they include everything (or, everything but the hoop, in some cases) you need to complete a specific project.

Enter through August 30, 2017 for your chance to win an issue of By Hand Lookbook No. 2 and five Plaid Bucilla stitchable, counted cross stitch, and stamped embroidery kits from Underground Crafter

The Handmade Charlotte Stitchables include laser cut wood shapes, embroidery floss in a variety of colors, a needle that will fit through the laser cut holes, and instructions with a color chart. Of course, you can make your own color choices, too. These wood shapes can be used as ornaments or for embellishing cards, gift wrap, or other craft projects. This giveaway includes the Handmade Charlotte Hedgehog Stitchable and the Peace Sign Stitchable. The Stitchables are great for people with no needlework experience because you can basically just insert the needle through the laser cut holes without having to make perfect stitches.

The Handmade Charlotte Stamped Embroidery kit includes stamped denim fabric, cotton embroidery floss, a needle, and instructions. It doesn’t include an embroidery hoop and the stitching is slightly more complex, so this kit is better suited to someone who has done embroidery before and has a hoop at home (or is willing to buy a hoop to go with the kit and has the patience to learn). This giveaway includes the Handmade Charlotte Stamped Embroidery Tribal Medallion kit.

The My 1st Stitch kits are presumably designed for children, but they work for grown folks, too. The Stop and Smell the Roses Counted Cross Stitch kit includes black Aida cloth, embroidery floss in a variety of colors, a needle, and instructions with a chart. The Believe Everything Happens for a Reason Counted Cross Stitch kit includes a plastic embroidery hoop, white Aida cloth, embroidery floss in several colors, buttons for embellishment, and instructions with a chart. If you’ve been wanting to try out counted cross stitch, both kits are included in this giveaway.

These Plaid Bucilla kits are fun because supplies are included (as well as the project ideas!), but they have enough flexibility that you can also adapt them by using your own preferred colors of embroidery floss, your own needles, etc.


By Hand Lookbook No. 2

Enter through August 30, 2017 for your chance to win an issue of By Hand Lookbook No. 2 and five Plaid Bucilla stitchable, counted cross stitch, and stamped embroidery kits from Underground Crafter

By Hand is a new serial publication about “fiber and fabric making communities.” This giveaway is for Lookbook No. 2: Portland and mid-coast Maine. These publications aim to highlight communities where fiber and fabric crafts are popular in a variety of ways. By Hand is published three times a year and is printed as a paperback on matte paper. It’s like a cross between a hefty magazine and a crafter’s travel guide to a specific location. This issue includes six knitting patterns, one recipe, and two sewing projects along with profiles of fiber artists and makers, crafts businesses, and eateries in Portland and mid-coast Maine. You can enjoy By Hand as a travel guide (for example, by taking their suggestion about where to eat or to go for a day trip) or as a crafts magazine filled with project ideas and inspiring interviews centered around a specific location. The photography includes a combination of outdoor shots, stylized project pictures, and candid portraits of various makers and creative business owners. It’s written in a conversational tone and has so many pictures that you’ll feel like you’re spending a day around town with the author, Andrea Hungerford, and the photographer, Karen DeWitz, as you read or flip through it.

You can learn more about By Hand here and see what issues have already been published and which locations are planned for future issues so you can plan your travel accordingly!

Giveaway

Enter through August 30, 2017 for your chance to win an issue of By Hand Lookbook No. 2 and five Plaid Bucilla stitchable, counted cross stitch, and stamped embroidery kits from Underground Crafter

So, are you ready to be inspired? This collection of goodies can be transformed into handmade gifts for someone else, or you can gift them to your favorite crafter, or you can make something for yourself!

This giveaway is open to readers with mailing addresses in the United States, except where prohibited by law. Enter by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Wednesday, August 30, 2017. One winner will be chosen at random from the entries submitted via the Rafflecopter widget. The winner will receive 5 kits from Plaid Bucilla (including Handmade Charlotte Stitchables and Stamped Embroidery and My 1st Stitch Counted Cross Stitch kits) and 1 copy of By Hand Lookbook No. 2, courtesy of Plaid Bucilla, By Hand, and Underground Crafter. Good luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Year of Projects: Crochet Master Class – Year one finale in Bruges lace

This post contains affiliate links.

This post is part of my Year of ProjectsCrochet Master Class series. You can read the other posts in this series here.

I am having great fun with Bruges lace, which I’m learning from the master herself, Tatyana Mirer, in a three-week class at Knit-A-Way.  I’m the only person in the class at the moment, and it is a fabulous experience to spend the time with such an amazing teacher and designer.  Last week, I mentioned that I had bought a skein of Lamb’s Pride Worsted at the shop for the class, and it was more or less a disaster.  The yarn is actually quite nice, but it is really just not a good fit with Bruges lace swatches!

My Bruges lace square in Victorian Pink (which looked lavender to me when I bought it).

After the first class, I decided to use some Galler Yarns Parisian Cotton that I have on hand from some designs I have done for them.  I don’t use crochet cotton thread that often, but it is absolutely perfect for Bruges lace.  It was also just about the only yarn I cared to touch during the two days last week which were well over 95 degrees and extremely humid!

I should mention that I haven’t blocked any of these swatches.

A Bruges lace circle.

 

A Bruges lace curve.
A Bruges lace oval. I had a lot of fun with this one.
The first part of a Bruges lace wave.
A Bruges lace square in progress. I lost my trusty 00 crochet hook on the subway shortly thereafter :(.

My favorite technique was adding an insert to the Bruges lace square.  I see a lot of interesting possibilities for granny squares.

Bruges lace motifs are join-as-you-go, so I could avoid at least some of the yarn ends…

On Thursday, I’ll have the last class.  Tatyana will be showing me some tubular techniques, and I’ll also be starting the Sparkling Wave Scarf from The Complete Photo Guide to Crochet.  I plan to make it as a holiday gift for my friend, OB, as part of my Holiday Stashdown Challenge.

I’m surprised that it has been almost a year since I joined in on the Year of Projects through the Come Blog-A-long group on Ravelry.  Even though I had been planning to work my way through Crochet Master Class: Lessons and Projects from Today’s Top Crocheters anyway, I had a wonderful time joining in with other crafty bloggers along the way!  Next Sunday, I’ll share my plans for year 2 of the Year of Projects (which I’m still formulating in my head).  You might want to join in, too!

This year, I had a chance to try out many techniques from Crochet Master Class that I had never used before, like hairpin lacesingle crochet entrelacpainted crochetfreeform, and Bruges lace.  I experimented a lot more with techniques I had used before, like woven crochetTunisian crochetfilet crochetdouble-ended crochetIrish crochet, and the bullion stitch.  I so wanted to be like Minding My Own Stitches, a YOP blogger who faithfully completed every project in one book.  Alas, I found that I wasn’t inspired to work with some of the techniques from the book.  And there are other techniques that I didn’t cover that I definitely want to return to, like overlay crochet and tapestry crochet.

I’m very grateful to harleagh from When Did I Become a Knitter for hatching up the idea of blogging through a book, and, of course, to Rita Weiss and the late Jean Leinhauser for compiling a collection that really inspired me to push myself creatively and to further develop my crochet techniques.  I look forward to more exploration in the next year!

Year of Projects: Crochet Master Class – Plaid progress

This post contains affiliate links.

This post is part of my Year of Projects: Crochet Master Class series.  You can find my other posts about woven crochet here and here.

I don’t have much to report on for my Year of Projects goals this week.  As much as it has been fun to be more active on my blog this month, I am very much looking forward to the end of Blogtoberfest, 2011!  I plan to take a few days off away from the blog, even though I have a few books to review.

Between all of the blogging, a busy season at work, and the secret swatching I’ve been doing for design submissions, I have only made a wee bit of progress on my plaid pillow project, started during my Tartans & Plaids class with Jenny King at the Lion Brand Yarn Studio.

One panel is finished, but I still have to weave in the ends.
Thanks to my class with Jenny King, my plaid is woven evenly!

I’m still debating whether I should felt the finished project.  Opinions?

For more Year of Projects posts, visit When Did I Become a Knitter.

To find more blogs participating in Blogtoberfest 2011, visit Tinnie Girl.  For Blogtoberfest 2011 giveaways, visit Curly Pops.