Free Tunisian crochet pattern: Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf

Free Tunisian crochet pattern: Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf with video tutorial by Underground Crafter | This stitch creates a warm and elegant pattern that resembles the stockinette stitch in knitting. The Tunisian Purl Stitch borders and the Extended Knit Stitch make this Tunisian crochet project unlikely to curl. This scarf is designed to meet the donation requirements of the Red Scarf Project, a program of Foster Care to Success which provides care packages to foster youth in colleges and training programs. This post is part of my monthly charity spotlight series where I highlight a charity that accepts crochet or knit donations and share a free pattern, so read on for details!

This post contains affiliate links. Materials for the sample were generously provided by Denise and Kraemer Yarns.

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Featured Charity: Foster Care to Success (The Red Scarf Project)

Since 1981, Foster Care to Success (formerly known as the Orphan Foundation of America) has helped to support young adults transitioning out of foster care into independent living. In most states, children “age out” of foster care at age 18 or upon graduating from high school. Foster Care to Success steps in and provides the type of support and structure that other young adults may get from their families, including college and career guidance, advice and training in personal finance, and academic and financial support for college and training programs.

The Red Scarf Project is one program of Foster Care to Success (FCS). Every February, FCS sends Valentine’s Day care packages to the students in its program. These packages include goodies like snacks, gift cards, and personal care items, along with handmade red scarves.

Since 2005, over 25,000 red scarves have been distributed to young adults in colleges and training programs across the United States. You can learn more about The Red Scarf Project on the FCS website here. Scarves can be mailed to The Red Scarf Project office in Sterling, Virginia. Due to storage limitations, scarves are only accepted from September 1 through December 15 annually.

Charity Guide

Tips for Making Great Red Scarf Project Donations

Free Tunisian crochet pattern: Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf with video tutorial by Underground Crafter | This stitch creates a warm and elegant pattern that resembles the stockinette stitch in knitting. The Tunisian Purl Stitch borders and the Extended Knit Stitch make this Tunisian crochet project unlikely to curl. This scarf is designed to meet the donation requirements of the Red Scarf Project, a program of Foster Care to Success which provides care packages to foster youth in colleges and training programs.

Foster Care to Success distributes scarves to youth adults in their program. Scarves must be made with red yarn, predominantly red multicolor yarn, or include red stripes. The style should be unisex and they ask that each scarf drape and tie easily. Fringe is optional but welcome. To ensure that scarves are warm and provide adequate neck coverage for young adults of various sizes, scarves must measure at least 60” (152.5 cm) long and 5” (13 cm) to 8” (20.5 cm) wide. Yarn tails should be securely woven in and handmade tags including care instructions are much appreciated.

You can find The Red Scarf Project guidelines along with links to free crochet and knitting patterns here. Remember that scarf donations are only accepted from September 1 through December 15 due to space restrictions.

About the Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf

Back in June, I went to Washington, D.C. for The National NeedleArts Association summer show and I met the lovely ladies who work at Denise as well as the team from Kraemer Yarns. (Longtime readers know that I love my Denise interchangeable crochet hooks, so I was thrilled to learn about the Denise2Go Crochet for a Cure 2-Hook Set.) After the show, I received a set of the hooks to try out as well as some Perfection Super Bulky from Kraemer, and the idea for this scarf started to come together.

Free Tunisian crochet pattern: Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf with video tutorial by Underground Crafter | This stitch creates a warm and elegant pattern that resembles the stockinette stitch in knitting. The Tunisian Purl Stitch borders and the Extended Knit Stitch make this Tunisian crochet project unlikely to curl. This scarf is designed to meet the donation requirements of the Red Scarf Project, a program of Foster Care to Success which provides care packages to foster youth in colleges and training programs.

The Perfection Super Bulky is an easy care yarn (and let’s face it, most college students are doing laundry in a rush!). It actually comes in several shades of red, so it’s perfect for The Red Scarf project. I wanted to create a very warm project because I knew some of the students would probably rely on this scarf as their primary winter wear. Tunisian crochet is great for ultra warm winter projects since it can create a dense fabric, but sometimes it can be too dense. That’s why I wanted to pair the super bulky yarn with my Denise2Go kit since it has a broad range of hook sizes. I used the N-15/10 mm hook for the sample, but I tend to have tight tension, which is why I recommend the M-13/9 mm hook for most crocheters. If you’re new to Tunisian crochet, don’t worry! I’ve included a complete video tutorial at the end of the pattern.

If you’re looking for other projects that would make great donations to The Red Scarf Project, try my free crochet pattern for the Color Blocked Co-Ed Scarf.

Color Blocked Co-Ed Scarf, free #crochet pattern by Underground Crafter

If you make your own Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, Google+ as +UndergroundCrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter.

Add the Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf to your Ravelry favorites or queue.

Underground Crafter on RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Underground Crafter on Craftsy

Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf

Tunisian Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

02-easy 50US terms 506-superbulkyThis stitch creates a warm and elegant pattern that resembles the stockinette stitch in knitting. The Tunisian Purl Stitch borders and the Extended Knit Stitch make this Tunisian crochet project unlikely to curl. This scarf is designed to meet the donation requirements of the Red Scarf Project.

Free Tunisian crochet pattern: Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf with video tutorial by Underground Crafter | This stitch creates a warm and elegant pattern that resembles the stockinette stitch in knitting. The Tunisian Purl Stitch borders and the Extended Knit Stitch make this Tunisian crochet project unlikely to curl. This scarf is designed to meet the donation requirements of the Red Scarf Project, a program of Foster Care to Success which provides care packages to foster youth in colleges and training programs.

Finished Size

  • Teen/Adult: 6.75” (17 cm) wide x 65.5” (166.5 cm) long.

Materials

Gauge

  • 8.5 sts x 5.5 rows in EKS pattern = 4” (10 cm). Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • ch – chain
  • ea – each
  • EKS – Tunisian extended knit stitch – Insert hook from front to back through center of next vertical bar, yo and draw up a loop, leave loop on hook, ch 1.
  • rep – repeat
  • Return Row – Ch 1, *yo and draw through 2 loops; rep from * across.
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • TPS – Tunisian purl stitch – Bring yarn to front, insert hook under next vertical bar, yo and draw up a loop, leave loop on hook.
  • yo – yarn over
  • * Repeat instructions after asterisk as indicated.

Pattern Notes

  • Tunisian crochet rows are worked in 2 parts (forward and return) without turning.
  • First vertical bar of each row (underneath first chain on hook) is always skipped.
  • A video tutorial for the special stitches is available at the end of the pattern.

Pattern Instructions

Scarf

  • Ch 16 (or any multiple of sts).
  • Base Row: Forward Row: Skip first ch, *insert hook in next ch, yo and draw up a loop, leave loop on hook; rep from * across. Rep Return Row.
  • Row 1: Forward Row: TPS in next st and ea st across. Rep Return Row.
  • Row 2: Rep Row 1 Forward and Return.
  • Row 3: Forward Row: EKS in next st and ea st across. Rep Return Row.
  • Rep Row 3 until scarf measures 64.5” (164 cm) long, or approximately 1” (2.5 cm) shorter than desired length.
  • Rows 4-5: Rep Row 1 Forward and Return twice.
  • Bind Off Row: *TPS in next st, yo and draw through both loops on hook; rep from * across. Fasten off.

Finishing

  • With yarn needle, weave in ends.

 

© 2016 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2016/10/26/free-pattern-tunisian-extended-knit-scarf. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

If you make your own Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, Google+ as +UndergroundCrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter.

Add the Tunisian Extended Knit Scarf to your Ravelry favorites or queue.

Underground Crafter on RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Underground Crafter on Craftsy

Giving Tuesday – The Crochet (and Knitting) Way

Today is Giving Tuesday, a national day of giving. I’m sharing some of my favorite crochet and knitting related charity links today in honor of this event, which encourages us to put aside the shopping for a moment during the holiday season. I hope this roundup with inspire you to share your talent (or money!) with charities that are important to you.

If you’re looking for a crochet-a-long, Sunset Family Living is hosting the annual 12 Days of Christmas Charity Challenge (also known as the NICU charity challenge). She is challenging people to crochet 12 hats for preemies in their local neonatal intensive care unit. Last year, over 26,000 (!) hats were donated as part of the challenge, which runs through January 6, 2015. 20 crochet designers have donated hat patterns, and if you’d like to sign up to participate, you can read more about the project here.

Dozen Baby Hats (in the round), a free knitting pattern by Denise Balvanz. Image (c) Denise Balvanz.
Dozen Baby Hats (in the round), a free knitting pattern by Denise Balvanz. Image (c) Denise Balvanz.

If you’re more of a hat knitter, check out Denise Balvanz’s free patterns, Dozen Baby Hats (in the round) and Dozen Baby Hats (knit flat). Both patterns were inspired by the Afghans for Afghans June-July Baby Shower, and are great projects to donate to a local charity, too.

Some designers sell specific patterns to raise funds for a favorite charity. Some of my favorites are the Mitered Cross Blanket (knitting) by Kay Gardiner. All proceeds from the sale of this pattern are donated to Mercy Corps, an international emergency response/disaster relief organization.

Mitered Crosses Blanket by Kay Gardiner. Image (c) Kay Gardiner.
Mitered Crosses Blanket by Kay Gardiner. Image (c) Kay Gardiner.

Dawn Hansen donates a portion of the proceeds from the sales of her Autism Awareness Puzzle Hat (knitting) pattern to the Autism SocietyCharity Windham’s Ten Stitch Twist for loom knitters pattern raises funds for Frankie Brown’s (interviewed here) favorite charity, the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation.  And speaking of Frankie Brown, she has has over 240 (!) free crochet and knitting patterns. She would greatly appreciate a donation to the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation through her Just Giving page.

Wheels within Wheels, one of my favorite patterns by Frankie Brown. Image (c) Frankie Brown.

Anastacia Zittel uses the same model, and appreciates a contribution to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America in exchange for her free knitting pattern, Armwarmers, or for any of her over 65 free crochet patterns. (I also interviewed Anastacia here.)

Alexis Winslow’s Caring Cowl (knitting) is another fundraiser pattern. Alexis donates proceeds from this pattern to the American Red Cross.

Caring Cowl by Alexis Winslow. Image (c) Alexis Winslow.
Caring Cowl by Alexis Winslow. Image (c) Alexis Winslow.

I donate $1 from each sale of my 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets ebook, which includes 20 crochet and 10 Tunisian crochet patterns that are great for pet blankets, to a local no-kill pet charity each year.

A selection of stitches included in 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets.
A selection of stitch patterns included in 30 Purrfect Stitches for Pet Blankets.

I also donate pet blankets in the sizes suggested by the Snuggles Project. (I interviewed Deborah Green from Bideawee about blanket donations here, if you’d like to hear how local shelters use these blankets.) The website allows you to search for a local pet charity that accepts handmade blankets. The Snuggles Project is a program of Hugs for Homeless Animals.

Another organization that accepts handmade goodies is Project Linus. Their mission is to “provide love, a sense of security, warmth and comfort to children who are seriously ill, traumatized, or otherwise in need through the gifts of new, handmade blankets and afghans, lovingly created by volunteer ‘blanketeers.'”You can find out more about donating a crocheted or knit (or sewn) blanket to a local chapter, contributing funds to help defray shipping costs or volunteering on their website.

The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet. Image (c) Bella Crochet.
The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet. Image (c) Bella Crochet.

If donating an entire blanket is out of your crochet comfort zone, Warm Up America is another charity that distributes blankets and accessories to a variety of social services agencies. You can send a blanket square, or accessories such as hats or scarves to them for distribution. The Kitty Cap by Bella Crochet is a great free crochet pattern for making children’s hats for charity.

Twisted Cable Scarf and Headband, a free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman. Image (c) Kim Guzman.
Twisted Cable Scarf and Headband, a free crochet pattern by Kim Guzman. Image (c) Kim Guzman.

You might also be interested in the Red Scarf Project from Foster Care to Success. Each year, they coordinate the delivery of Valentine’s Day care packages, including handmade scarves, to young adults who have aged out of foster care as they experience life on their own at college. You can learn more about this charity in the current issue of Crochetvolution here. There are also two great free crochet patterns in this issue, Big Red and Vino Scarf, that would make great projects for the Red Scarf Project. You can also try some of Kim Guzman’s many great free winter patterns. (I interviewed Kim here.) Two of my favorites that would be perfect for the Red Scarf Project are the Reversible Pinstripe Scarf (double-ended crochet) or the Twisted Cable Scarf.

What are your favorite charities to share your crochet and knitting with?

2012 Year in Review: Frog Fest!

I’m not the type of crocheter (or knitter) who feels the need to complete every project I start.  Sometimes I start a project for stress relief, other times I make a bad yarn choice, and then there are times when the project just isn’t really something I want to work on anymore.

Today, I’m celebrating all those creations that actually made it as far as into my Ravelry projects but were later unraveled.  While I actually unraveled 12 projects in 2012 (freaky, huh?), I’m just going to talk about the three most significant ones today.

If you followed my second Year of Projects posts, you may remember that I was working on my first pair of knit socks.

I started these during the Ravellenic Games, hoping that would be the push I needed to actually get excited about making knitted socks.  I love looking at other people’s knit socks and I love wearing hand-knit socks, but something about actually knitting socks never seemed all that appealing to me.

I think I’ll stick with crochet socks.  I’m not all that comfortable knitting with small needles or with lightweight yarn and I just don’t feel committed to spending the amount of time needed to knit a single pair of socks.

Another learning experience was the slip stitch scarf I started for the Red Scarf Project.  Vashti Braha‘s newsletters got me very excited about using more slip stitches in my projects.  Unfortunately, I didn’t really think this one through.

Let’s just say that the combination of not so great quality acrylic yarn, watching a movie while crocheting, and slip stitches is not a good one.  I decided to unravel this, along with a Christmas stocking I made last year (in red wool)…

…and give slip stitch crochet another try in wool in 2013.

 

I think the addition of this hook I found at a shop near my job, which looks like a pjoning hook, will also help to make the stitches more even.

And finally, there’s the Pineapple Doily Shawl I started.

Several students in my crochet class were working on it, and I decided to start one, too.  I don’t usually work on projects with my students (besides a little swatch I make in class), and this experience hasn’t encouraged me to make it a habit.

I inherited this yarn from my grandmother and I eventually want to make it into something special for my mom.  So far, the perfect project for this yarn hasn’t revealed itself.

 

Do you unravel projects, do you always finish what you start, or do you abandon projects that aren’t working out?

Red Scarf Project

It’s that time of year when crocheters and knitters are sending their handmade goodies to the Red Scarf Project.  If you aren’t familiar with the Red Scarf Project, it is a program operated by Foster Care to Success: America’s College Fund for Foster Youth.  FCS sends foster care college students care packages, including a Valentine’s Day care package with a crochet or knit red scarf inside.

This charity is close to my heart for a few reasons.  Early in my career, I worked with a youth program and made frequent visits to foster care group homes.  That experience definitely showed me the tremendous challenges that foster care youth face.  And, when I first started connecting my passion for crochet with the online crafting community, the Red Scarf Project was the first charity I learned about online where I could send my crocheted goodies.

Due to space restrictions, donations are only accepted between September 1 and December 15 each year.  In case you’re interested in sharing some of your crochet or knitted scarves with the Red Scarf Project, I’m including the guidelines from their website here:

RED SCARF PROJECT GUIDELINES:

Size: approximately 60” long and 5” to 8” wide. Scarves should be long enough to be wrapped around the neck, with tails long enough to be tied in the front.

Style: Think unisex collegiate. Fringes are optional. Your scarf should drape, tie easily and be soft.

Color: Red! However, this could mean burgundy, cherry, russet, red stripes with other colors, or multicolor hues including red.

Finished & tagged: Yarn ends should be securely sewn in. For a personal touch, attach a tag saying “Handmade for You” with your first name, city, and group affiliation, if any. Donors have also included washing instructions, messages of encouragement, gift cards, and more.

Mail to: Foster Care to Success, Red Scarf Project
21351 Gentry Drive Suite 130
Sterling, VA 20166

NOTE: Scarves are accepted between September 1 and December 15 annually.  As we have limited storage space, please send your scarves only during this time period.

As I was looking over the Red Scarf Project website this year, I saw that there are links to nine pattern pages, but only one is to a crochet pattern :(.

After working relentlessly on secret projects for the past week, I’m in the mood to mindlessly follow someone else’s pattern.  Now that I’ve been so good about busting stash, I only have about 250 yards of red yarn left, so I did a Ravelry search for low yardage, unisex scarf patterns.  I came across the Eva’s Ribs Scarf Pattern by Vashti Braha (interviewed by me here).  I remember Vashti’s slip stitch explorations in her newsletter, so I’m excited to try this out.  Who knows, if I like slip stitching, I might end up making myself the Eva Shrug

 

Do you have a favorite charity that accepts handmade donations?  

 

I’m  blogging daily throughout October.  Visit I Saw You Dancing for more Blogtoberfest bloggers and  CurlyPops for Blogtoberfest giveaways.  Search #blogtoberfest12 on Twitter.

F.O. Friday and I Love Yarn Day!

Happy Friday everyone!  I’ve been thinking for a while about how to celebrate I Love Yarn Day, since I first read about it on the Craft Yarn Council website.  The CYC has several suggestions about what to do to celebrate (and several projects from famous designers, too!).

My post for today is a celebration of my favorite yarns and also about yarncrafting for charity.  If you have been crocheting or knitting for any amount of time, you have probably found that we yarncrafters are a generous lot.  I even have some Finished Objects to share, in the form of charity crochet projects.

My Favorite Yarns

My current favorites are Cascade Eco Duo, Stitch Nation by Debbie Stoller Alpaca Love, Dream in Color Classy, Patons Classic Wool, and Spud and Chloe Sweater.

Top (from left to right): Eco Duo, Alpaca Love. Bottom (from left to right): Classy, Classic Wool (ombre) with Lion Brand Fishermen’s Wool (solid), Sweater.

Cascade Eco Duo

Like most of the yarns on my list, I discovered this super soft yarn in my LYS, Knitty City.  As the name implies, Cascade Eco Duo is an eco-friendly yarn made of undyed baby alpaca (70%) and undyed Merino wool (30%).  Since it is undyed, it is offered in a relatively limited range of colors (mostly browns, blacks, whites – very gender neutral) and it is marled.  The softness is incredible and it is really nice to work with.  There is a kind of self-striping effect with most of the colors.  The one drawback for me is that it isn’t machine washable, and since I hate handwashing, I only use this yarn for small accessories.

Stitch Nation by Debbie Stoller Alpaca Love

This is my favorite big box store yarn. Alpaca Love is also a wool (80%) and alpaca (20%) blend.  I love the feel of the yarn – a great combination of softness with firmness.  It comes in some very fun coordinated colors.  This yarn is very affordable (especially when purchased at Michaels using a coupon!).  The drawbacks for me are the handwashing issue again, and the limited color range.  I usually get around the handwashing issue by felting projects made with this yarn :).

Dream in Color Classy

Dream in Color Classy is another great yarn that I first tried out at Knitty City.  This yarn has recently made several appearances on the blog (in my crocodile stitch project and my yarn haul post).  Classy is a 100% superwash Merino wool yarn that is spun and hand dyed in the U.S.  The colors are variegated and are really fabulous.  The only drawback here for me is the cost, which means that I have to save it for slightly more special occasions.  At least there are 250 yards in each skein, which makes me feel a little less guilty when splurging!

Patons Classic Wool

Patons Classic Wool is another big box store yarn.  It is 100% wool and it is available in a great variety of colors, including both solids and ombres.  (A few colors are also available as tweeds.)  The  solids have 210 yards in each skein and are reasonably priced.  It isn’t the softest wool I’ve felt, but it isn’t scratchy, either.  It is a great, firm, workhorse yarn which doesn’t split.  The only real drawback for me is that it isn’t machine washable.

Spud and Chloe Sweater

Sweater is probably the yarn in this group that I’ve worked with the most.  It is a blend of 55% superwash wool and 45% organic cotton.  I also found it at Knitty City 🙂 about a year ago.  I first picked up a skein of Turtle for a design submission which wasn’t accepted.  I loved the yarn so much that I submitted two more designs with it, which were both accepted.  The first was my Sunshine Blanket, published in the August, 2011 issue of Inside Crochet.  I am also in the middle of a top secret project using these colors for Cooperative Press‘s Fresh Designs Crochet (Kids) book, which should be published in 2012.  I honestly can’t think of any drawbacks to this yarn: the colors are great, it is machine washable, and it feels nice :).

You may have noticed that all of these yarns are worsted weight – yes, I am one of those American yarncrafters that prefers a heavier weight yarn!  You may have also noticed that all of these yarns are made with natural fibers.  I am by no means a “yarn snob” – I work with Red Heart Super Saver, too.  But recently, I have really tried to limit my purchasing of acrylic yarn.  I just don’t feel comfortable buying a yarn made from crude oil anymore.  This is my own personal choice as part of changes I’ve made in my life to be more environmentally conscious.  On the other hand, I can’t just let the existing acrylic yarn in my stash go to waste (that’s  not too eco-friendly either), and so that is where some of my charity crafting and experiments with freeform crochet come into play.

Charity Crafting

One great way to use up your stash while finding a home for some of your creations is through charity crafting.  I especially like to make items for infants and pets (because they are fast and cute, and because my very own special cat was adopted from the Humane Society).

I was inspired by the phrase “Think globally.  Act locally.” and decided to make up a list of local NYC charities that accept handmade donations.  I checked in with all of these organizations, and the list is current as of October, 2011.

Snuggles Project sites:

  • ASPCA, the first humane organization in the Western hemisphere, has a wishlist of donated items for their Manhattan adoption center which includes handmade bedding or toys.  Items can be dropped off during regular adoption hours.
  • Bideawee, the oldest no-kill animal humane organization in the U.S., welcomes Snuggles in any size for cats and dogs in its adoption center.  These can be delivered in person, or mailed to the attention of Lauren Bonanno at the Manhattan location.
  • S.A.V.E., a pet rescue organization in Queens, is looking for small or medium sized bedding.  Email the organization at [email protected] to arrange pick up.

Knits for Infants is looking for hats, booties, sweaters, and blankets in soft, machine washable yarns for newborns and infants being treated at the North Central Bronx Hospital.  Having worked in the health care industry in the Bronx for years, I can say that families served by this hospital would really benefit from the donations.  They also accept yarn donations (no novelty yarns or “scratchy” yarns like Red Heart Super Saver, please).

For those of you who live in the U.S. outside of New York, some great organizations you might consider donating to are one of the organizations listed on the Friends of Pine Ridge Reservation website (Oglala Sioux Tribe families and elders), Knit Your Bit through the National WW II Museum (scarves for veterans) and  The Red Scarf Project through Foster Care to Success (scarves for foster care students in college).  Internationally, you can find a participating animal shelter/pet rescue organization that accepts handmade donations through the Snuggles Project.  Of course, this is just a small sampling of organizations, and there are many more out there!

Finished Objects


Today, I’m showing off some of the projects that I’m donating to charity for I Love Yarn Day.

Six scarves for Lakota Oyate Wakanyeja Owicakiyapi, Inc. (LOWO).
Two scarves, a hat, and mittens for toddlers via Knits for Infants. I have two other hats in the works, too.
This is a close up of my snuggle for Bideawee. I plan to make a few more using scrap yarn (I doubt the doggies are too concerned about the colors).

My post yesterday was a reflection on my craft goals for the year, and I’m thinking that when I update them, I will add some charity crafting goals.  I used to donate a lot of projects to charity, and I would like to make more crocheted donations in the coming months.

For more finished objects, don’t forget to stop by Tami’s Amis!

A Final Word on Awesome Yarn

A few weeks ago, I won a giveaway from Danielle at A Stash Addicts Ramblings for my choice of sock yarn from her Jane & Michael Etsy shop.  This lovely skein arrived yesterday, just in time for I Love Yarn Day!

 

The colorway is called Emerald Forest.

 

(On a side note, I remember being totally confused by The Emerald Forest as a kid, since I was, of course, way too young to have any real sense of what the film was about!)

There’s a good chance that this may eventually transform itself into a gift for my mom.

Thanks, Danielle!

To find more blogs participating in Blogtoberfest 2011, visit Tinnie Girl.  For Blogtoberfest 2011 giveaways, visit Curly Pops.