DIY Gift Tags with Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.I’m excited to share a review of an instant print camera with video capabilities, along with a tutorial for making your own gift tags with personalized care instructions for your handmade gifts!

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. A Polaroid Snap Touch was provided to me for review. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions. Additional materials for this post were generously provided by Cricut and Oriental Trading.

Review: Polaroid Snap Touch

I’m going to age myself here, but my first camera was a hand-me-down Polaroid. The instantaneous printing may have been what actually got me into photography. I loved waiting for the pictures to expose after they popped out of the camera. Over the years, my taste in photography grew a bit more sophisticated, and first I got into the physical darkroom (in high school) and later into the virtual darkroom (using Lightroom). During that time, I grew away from Polaroid and I started playing with single-lens reflex (SLR) cameras.

Back in April, Polaroid was one of the exhibitors at the Snap Conference for bloggers, and I got a chance to see what they are up to today. (Things have changed quite a bit since the 1980s over at Polaroid.) I even got the chance to review one of Polaroid’s latest creations, the Snap Touch. I used it for a few months and today I’m sharing my review along with a tutorial for DIY project using the awesome instant print stickers. (Oops, spoiler alert: there are stickers involved.)

Okay, so let’s start with what’s in the box. (And, let me add that one thing that is frustrating about writing camera reviews is that you can’t take a picture of the camera with the camera. For that reason, many of the pictures in this post are taken with my Nikon D5300. I will indicate when the pictures are taken with the Snap Touch for comparison. More Snap Touch pictures are in the tutorial than the review, by the way.)

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.The Snap Touch comes with a package of ZINK photo paper, which uses zero-ink technology. These papers are 2″ x 3″ (5 cm x 7.5 cm) and have peel-back adhesive, so you can use them as photos or as stickers! It also includes the camera (obviously), a strap, a micro USB cable for charging, and a user guide. The camera has a magnetic cap and comes with its own flash.

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.You will need to get your own microSD card. I use a SanDisk 32GB microSD card to I can download and edit photos and videos later. (You can use a micro SD card up to 128 GB.) Once you unpack the camera, you can easily pop open the pack to install the ZINK paper.

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.With the camera out of the box, charged, and loaded with film and microSD card, you can use it several ways.

  • You can film HD video (on a Polaroid!). You can see a sample video I shared on Facebook below. The video was shot indoors using natural lighting, and I didn’t edit for exposure or white balance because I wanted to give you an idea about what the Snap Touch is capable of in a regular environment.

  • You can take instant photos. (And, they print out on stickers. How awesome is that?) Here’s a picture of a sticker of a picture of a scarf on the scarf itself!

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.

  • You can save photos for later on your microSD card. Yep, you can have it both ways – instant fun, and playtime in the virtual darkroom later. As an example, here are two pictures of the same scarf. The photo the left was taken with the Snap Touch and the photo on the right was taken with the Nikon D5300. Neither are edited. (The Nikon photo is more of a close up, though the pictures were taken at the same time, in the same position, and in the same lighting conditions.) You can see that the Snap Touch is able to hold its own quite well.

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.The camera is lightweight and easy to use. It comes ready to use with a tripod, so you don’t need to buy any adapters for that. I found that the Snap Touch fit well in my hand and I could fit it into a larger pocket if I was heading outside. There’s a LCD touch screen display that’s easy to understand. For instance, you can choose how many copies you want if you’re printing out a picture. This would be fun if you’re taking pictures at a party or family event – everyone can get their copy right away and you won’t have to worry about sending them out later.

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.You also have quite a bit of control over other settings, as you can see. For example, I like having a relatively dim screen and having the sound on, but not too loud.

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.You can also zoom (!), use an auto timer for self portraits, and even choose to take color, black and white, or sepia tone pictures. If you’re a natural lighting fanatic like me, you can even disable the flash. Also, if you’re into the Happy Planner, your Snap Touch pictures fit perfectly. You can watch this in action in the short video below.

The Snap Touch is available in the obvious colors like black and white, but also in fun colors like pink, blue, and purple. The Snap Touch retails for $179.99, but you can usually find it for less on Amazon. I love using it when carrying my DSLR is not convenient but I don’t want to pull out an enormous tablet to take pictures. (Also, unlike using a tablet, I can fill it up with pictures and videos when away from home without worrying about having to delete other important things like navigational apps.) It’s a great second camera for a photo nerd like me, or a main camera for anyone who wants a point-and-shoot with something more (the more being HD video, instant sticker photos, etc.). It’s also a really fun camera for kids because, you know, stickers. And, for us crafty types, the Snap Touch works out well for scrapbooking, using the Happy Planner, or making custom gift tags like the one’s I’m sharing a tutorial for below!


DIY Gift Tags with Handmade Care Labels

Tutorial by Underground Crafter

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.Your handmade gifts will be loved even more now that the recipients can identify the care instructions for their gift using these sticker photo gift tags! Jazz the tags up with scrapbook paper.

Materials

Instructions

Write and cut your gift tags

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.

  • Open the Gift Tag Cut File in Design Space. Customize tags to include care instructions for your gifts.
  • Place your Oriental Trading Animal Print Paper with the animal print side down on your cutting mat.
  • Load your Cricut pen.
  • Set your machine to cut paper.
  • Follow the prompts to write and cut.
  • Carefully remove your gift tags from the cutting mat. Recycle unused paper scraps.

Make your stickers

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.

  • Take pictures of the projects you plan to gift with your Polaroid Snap Touch and print on ZINK Photo Paper. (The photo above, as well as the photos on the stickers, is taken with the Snap Touch.)

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.

Assemble your gift tags

  • Stick the photo pictures on the front (animal print) side of the gift tag with the appropriate care instructions. Use the yarn needle to thread the yarn through the gift tag hole. (The photo below is taken with the Snap Touch.)

DIY Gift Tags and Handmade Care Labels with Polaroid Snap Touch review | Make your own gift tags with personalize care instructions for your handmade gifts using Oriental Trading Animal Print Pager, your Cricut, and instant Polaroid Snap Touch stickers.Once your gift tags are ready, tie them around your gift so the recipient will have a visual reminder for how to wash their handmade gift.

If you’re interested in making any of these projects as gifts of your own, you can find the free patterns here:

Crochet Pattern: Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf

Free crochet pattern: Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf in madelinetosh Prairie by Underground Crafter | This simple lace shawl is a perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. It also makes a great, lightweight scarf for the colder weatherI’m sharing a beginner-friendly crochet pattern today. (For all you crochet pros out there, this makes a good “tv project,” too.) The Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf uses a very simple lace pattern to make the perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. This project can also be worn as a lightweight triangular scarf for the colder weather. I love wearing lace yarn scarves because they fit neatly under my coat when I want to protect my neck from the wind.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. A sample of The Yarnit Mr. Sparkles was provided to me by The YarnIt. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions.

Last May, I bought a skein of madelinetosh Prairie on sale at my local yarn shop, Knitty City. (If you’re visiting New York, I recommend you check out Knitty City, along with the other shops in my Visitor’s Guide to NYC Yarn Shops.)

Free crochet pattern: Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf in madelinetosh Prairie by Underground Crafter | This simple lace shawl is a perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. It also makes a great, lightweight scarf for the colder weatherIt sat around for a while until inspiration struck. But, as often happens, inspiration struck at a time when it wasn’t all that convenient to be traveling around with a skein of lace yarn. Enter The YarnIt. If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen this review of The YarnIt a few months ago.

Last summer, I was introduced to the team at @theyarnit and was given a Mr. Sparkles #yarnit to try out. It has been invaluable in keeping my @madelinetosh Prairie lace #yarn from tangling. I’ve been worked on this #crochet lace shawl on the subway, on the bus, during a 2-hour meeting in an auditorium (where it was stowed under my seat), and at home on the couch with a frisky cat on my shoulder. The yarn feeds easily through the porthole and the globe’s material has survived several drops, too. I’m definitely going to be using the YarnIt to keep my future lace and sock yarn projects from getting tangled as I switch bags and locations. #IGotItFree #crocheting #crochetersofinstagram #instacrochet #madelinetosh

A post shared by Marie @ Underground Crafter (@ucrafter) on

If you’re new to The YarnIt, it’s a cross between a yarn bowl and a carrying case for your yarn. (Oh, and a protector from cats, as you can see in the short video below.)

The YarnIt came in very handy during my travels around town with this yarn. It fits nicely into pretty much every purse or project bag I have, and I can also lay it flat on the table and work from it directly. As you can tell from my Instagram picture, I don’t use the straps with mine. It seemed more practical for my crochet lifestyle without them. You can get The YarnIt on Amazon in a variety of colors.


So, back to the pattern for the Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf! As I mentioned, I am a huge fan of triangular shawls. I get the most wear out of ones with an isosceles, rather than equilateral, shape. (If you need a geometry refresher on triangle anatomy, Math is Fun is a helpful source.) These shawls are easy to tie and can be worn as shawls or scarves, so there are more styling options. Here are few other free crochet patterns for shawls with the same shape, if you decide to add more to your collection! Click on the image to go to the pattern.

Rainbow After the Storm Shawlette, free #crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter in Bonita Yarns Kaleidoscopic.

A Cold Snap Shawlette, free #crochet pattern by Underground Crafter | This simple shawlette recipe can be customized to your preferred size (or, to use up just the right amount of yarn!). This shawlette is perfect for accessorizing, keeping you cozy when it gets suddenly cold, or protecting your neck in air conditioning. The self-patterning yarn does all the colorwork for you.

Tina's Day-to-Night Shawl, free crochet pattern in Wool and the Gang Tina Tape yarn by Underground Crafter | This easy-to-make, large shawl transitions seamlessly from day-to-night with you. It’s perfect for wearing to work, with jeans, or when dressed up for a night out. The tencel yarn creates excellent drape.If you make your own Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter. You can also share a picture in the Underground Crafters Facebook group. Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a coupon code for your choice of one of my premium patterns and other subscriber goodies. Plus, you’ll never miss one of my free patterns again!

Add the Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf to your Ravelry favorites or queue.

Underground Crafter on Ravelry

If you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Underground Crafter on Craftsy

Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

Free crochet pattern: Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf in madelinetosh Prairie by Underground Crafter | This simple lace shawl is a perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. It also makes a great, lightweight scarf for the colder weather

This simple lace shawl is a perfect cover up to protect against a breeze on a warm night. Wear it as a lightweight triangular scarf in colder weather.

 

Finished Size

  • Adult: 63” (160 cm) wingspan x 8.25” (21 cm) spine before blocking; 67.5” (171.5 cm) wingspan x 9” (23 cm) spine after blocking.

Materials

  • madelinetosh Prairie yarn (100% Merino wool, 840 yd/768 m) – 1 skein in Holi Festival, or approximately 525 yd (480 m) in any lace weight yarn.
  • US SizeD-3/3.25 mm crochet hook, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn needle.
  • 3 locking stitch markers.

Gauge

  • 26 dc = 4” (10 cm) across before blocking. Exact gauge is not critical for this project.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • dc2tog – double crochet 2 stitches together – (Yo, insert hook in next st, yo and draw up a loop, yo and draw through 2 loops) twice, yo and drawn through all 3 loops on hook.
  • dc4tog – double crochet 4 stitches together – *Yo, insert hook in next st, yo and draw up a loop, yo and draw through 2 loops; rep from * 3 more times, yo and draw through all 5 loops on hook.
  • ea – each
  • rep – repeat
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sp – space
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • yo – yarn over
  • * Repeat instructions after asterisk as indicated.

Pattern Notes

Pattern Instructions

Shawl

Shape endpoint

  • Ch 3.
  • Row 1: Turn, sk 2 ch, 3 dc in next ch, place marker 1 in same ch to mark point. (3 sts)
  • Row 2: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and next st, 2 dc in next st. (4 sts)
  • Row 3: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and ea st across.
  • Row 4: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st, ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st, ch 1, dc in next st. (5 sts)

Increase towards midpoint

  • Row 5: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and in ea ch-1 sp and dc across.
  • Row 6: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and in ea st across to last, 2 dc in last st. (Increase by 1 st to even count)
  • Row 7: Rep Row 3.
  • Row 8: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st, *ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st; rep from * across to last st, ch 1, dc in same st. (Increase by 1 st to odd count)
  • Rep Rows 5-8 until shawl measures approximately 30” (76 cm), or about just under half of desired unblocked length, ending after Row 8.

Shape midpoint

  • Row 9: Rep Row 5
  • Row 10: Rep Row 3, place marker 2 in last st to mark midpoint.
  • Row 11: Rep Row 3.
  • Row 12: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st, *ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st; rep from * across.

Decrease to endpoint

  • Row 13: Rep Row 5.
  • Row 14: Ch 2, dc in same st and ea st across to last 2 sts, dc2tog. (Decrease by 1 st to even count)
  • Row 15: Rep Row 3.
  • Row 16: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st, *ch 1, sk 1 st, dc in next st; rep from * across to last 3 sts, ch 1, sk 2 sts, dc in next st. (Decrease by 1 st to odd count)
  • Rep Rows 13-16 until only 5 sts remain, ending after Row 16.

Shape endpoint

  • Row 17: Rep Row 5.
  • Row 18: Turn, ch 2, dc in same st and next 2 sts, dc2tog.
  • Row 19: Turn, ch 2, dc4tog, place marker 3 at top of dc4tog to mark endpoint. Do not fasten off.

Border

  • Turn to work along angled edge. Move marker up ea row.
  • Row 1: (Right Side) Ch 1, sc in marked st, 3 sc in side of ea row across to marker 2, (2 sc, ch 2, 2 sc) in side of marked row, move marker 2 to ch-2 sp, 3 sc in side of ea row across to marker 1, sc in marked st. (Mult of 3 sts + ch-2 sp)
  • Row 2: Turn, ch 3 (counts as dc), *dc in next st, ch 2, sk 2 sts;** rep from * across to ch 2 sp, (dc, ch 3, dc, ch 2) in ch-2 sp, move up marker 2 to ch-3 sp, sk 2 sts, rep from * to ** across to last 2 sts, dc in next 2 sts.
  • Row 3: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st, *sc in next st, 2 sc in ch-2 sp;** rep from * across to st before ch-3 sp, sc in next st, (2 sc, ch 1, 2 sc) in ch-3 sp, rep from * to ** across to last 2 sts, sc in next 2 sts. Fasten off.

Finishing

© 2017 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2017/09/12/crochet-pattern-simple-lace-isosceles-shawl-or-scarf. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

If you make your own Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter. You can also share a picture in the Underground Crafters Facebook group. Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a coupon code for your choice of one of my premium patterns and other subscriber goodies. Plus, you’ll never miss one of my free patterns again!

Add the Simple Lace Isosceles Shawl or Scarf to your Ravelry favorites or queue.

Underground Crafter on Ravelry

If you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Underground Crafter on Craftsy

 

Cricut Basics: Which Cutting Machine Should I Buy?

Which Cutting Machine Should I Buy? on Underground Crafter - comparing Cricut Explore, Silhouette Cameo, and Sizzix machines

If you’ve been considering buying a cutting machine, you’re in the same position I was about a year ago. I spent a lot of time online reading reviews, so I thought the least I could do to help other crafters is to write my own comparison post. If you’re hoping to find the right machine for you, this post will help you!

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Materials for this post were provided by Cricut.

I actually bought a Silhouette Portrait last spring (primarily because of its small size, which seemed ideal for apartment living), but I returned it soon after because I received a Cricut Explore Air in exchange for promoting an event last summer. I’m so glad I ended up with a Cricut Explore Air because I love it. I’m obviously a bit biased towards the machine I have and use regularly, and I have limited experience with other cutting machines, so I reached out to the blog-o-sphere for help. I took prodigious notes when I was working at the Cricut booth at the SNAP! Conference for creative bloggers back in April, I interviewed a fellow blogger, and I’ve combined my own experiences, feedback from blogging friends, and links to other blog reviews in this post so you can make your own decision about how Cricut machines compare to other cutting machines by Silhouette and Sizzix, and which machine is the right one FOR YOU.

Questions to ask yourself

Here are a few of the main questions to consider when you’re comparing cutting machines.

  • How and where will you use this machine? Will you be near an ethernet connection or WiFi?
  • Do you want a manual machine or an electronic machine? Do you want to save money on the machine but then spend money on dies/cartridges? Or, would you rather spend money on a machine but then save money on dies/cartridges?
  • Do you need a beginner-friendly machine or are you confident enough to explore the machine’s features (and software) with less guidance?
  • How large are the projects you plan to make? What type of materials do you plan to cut?

The answers to these questions can help you pick the best machine for you and help you avoid disappointment.

Cricut Explore series

I’ll start by talking about the machines I know most about, the Cricut Explore series. There are three models in the series. All three use a cloud-based software, Cricut Design Space, which allows you to send information from your computer or tablet/mobile device to your Cricut Explore. The machines have the same primary features, such as the ability to…

You can read more about each of these features while getting links to 15+ free beginner-friendly Cricut Explore projects here.

Since Cricut Design Space is cloud-based, you do need to have an active internet connection in order to design your project. I’ve used Design Space with my tablet and laptop at home and with WiFi away from home and I haven’t had any problems. However, if you spend a lot of time away from an internet connection, this may not be ideal for you.

Cricut also has a thorough, searchable online Help Center and you can reach them through online chat seven days a week and through their toll free phone number Monday through Friday. I love that it’s so easy to reach out with questions.

There are currently three machines in the Cricut Explore series.

  • The Explore One machines are the most affordable models. These are wired machines that you connect directly to your device. These have one tool holder, so you can write and cut, but not at the same time.
  • The Explore Air and Explore Air 2 both have two tool holders so you can write and cut in the same project without changing tools. These machines also Bluetooth to send information from Design Space on your device to your Cricut.
  • The Explore Air 2 writes and cuts up to twice as fast as the other two machines. If you plan to use your Cricut a lot (such as for a classroom or small business), this feature is definitely worth the added price.

What I personally like about the Explore Air is that it’s super easy to use, right out of the box, because there’s a welcome project WITH SUPPLIES included. (You can see what else it comes with in this post.)

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground Crafter

Being able to create a project that used cutting and writing straight out of the box helped me to understand the features and to build the confidence to start creating my own designs and projects. I’ve heard from so many people who buy a cutting machine or receive one as a gift and it sits in the box forever because it’s too confusing to get started. The Cricut is definitely beginner friendly, which means that you can transition from a beginner to a pro with ease. (There’s also a Craftsy class that’s really helpful for Cricut Explore newbies, Craft and Create with Your Cricut Explore with Lia Griffith.)

Another thing I like about the Cricut Explore Air machines is that you have options in terms of color. Currently, there are Gold, Wild Orchid (my favorite), and Mint (Explore Air 2) options in addition to the standard Blue that I have. You can coordinate most of your tools to match your machine. I like the idea that my machine can be a little bit more personalized.

And, if you had an older Cricut die cutting machine, you can actually import your cartridges into your Explore.

Silhouette machines

I don’t have personal experience with the Silhouette Cameo 3, but I did a lot of research on Silhouette machines before I got my Cricut and, as I mentioned, I ended up buying a Silhouette Portrait. I never actually used it because as a total newbie to cutting machines, I felt completely lost. There wasn’t much in the box to help newbies and I sold it right after I received my Cricut Explore Air. If you’ve used die cutting machines or other electronic cutting machines, you may feel more confident with a Silhouette. A lot of my favorite bloggers use Silhouettes, so I’ve been very impressed by the projects they can create. In fact, my friend Alexis from Persia Lou teaches a Craftsy class, Silhouette Savvy: Venture Into Vinyl, that helps Cameo 3 users get comfortable with vinyl projects.

Like the Cricut Explore machines, the Silhouette Cameo 3 can cut over 100 materials and it also has a feature where you can take images with your tablet/device for cutting. As far as I can tell, the Cameo 3 doesn’t have the writing capability of Cricut machines. Silhouette Studio, the design software, is not cloud-based, like Cricut Design Space. Instead, you download it on your machine. I can see pros and cons of that, so you’d have to decide which option is best for you.


I found some reviews that were really helpful if you’re considering a Silhouette Cameo.

The key differences I’ve seen highlighted between Cricut Explore machines and Silhouette Cameos are…

  • Cameos can cut up to 10 feet without a mat, which is helpful if you tend to create very large home decor projects.
  • Silhouette Studio software is stored on your computer/device, while Cricut Design space is cloud-based.
  • Cricut Design Space is more beginner-friendly and Cricut machines make more precise cuts, especially on heavier materials.

If you end up choosing Silhouette Cameo 3, Silhouette School shares her tips for getting started for beginners (including videos) in this post.

Sizzix machines

I’ve used a Sizzix die cutting machine, the Big Shot, which is more affordable than an electronic cutting machine (unless, of course, you plan to make a variety of projects and start buying a lot of dies, which can add up quickly). Since I don’t know much about Sizzix machines, I asked my friend Marjie from Marjie Kemper Designs if she could share some of what she likes about her Sizzix machines with you.

Underground Crafter (UC): Which cutting machine(s) do you own?

Marjie: I have two Sizzix machines – the Big Shot and the Vagabond.

UC: What is your favorite thing about your machines?

Marjie: The Vagabond is my favorite. It’s electric, which makes cutting a breeze. It can cut up to 5 pieces of paper at once, as well as all kinds of thick materials (chipboard, corrugated cardboard, shrink plastic, fabric, etc.)  I also love using it with embossing folders.

The Big Shot is great too.  It’s my workhorse… I take it everywhere I teach.  It’s manual, though, so a bit more effort.

UC: What kinds of projects/materials do you recommend this machine for?

Marjie: I use my Sizzix die-cutting machines for mixed media art and scrapbooking.

UC: What tips do you have Sizzix newbies?

Marjie: My advice to newbies is to play around with shims.  Some dies are delicate and you might not get a good cut the first try. This is especially true with thin dies, often called Thinlits. I keep an old notebook next to my machine and tear out pages to use as shims. You’d be surprised how well some of the thin dies work when you add a folded over piece of notebook paper along with your chosen paper.  They make it cut like butter!

To give you an idea of what types of projects you can create with a Sizzix machine, Marjie shared this image from a recent blog post: Nelson Mandela Quote Collage.

(By the way, if you’re interested in exploring mixed media, Marjie teaches Inventive Ink: Colorful Mixed Media Effects on Craftsy.)

Sizzix also has an electronic, die-free cutting machine called the eclips2. I don’t know anyone who uses it, so I couldn’t get any insider information, but here’s an unboxing with review and getting started video by Ken’s Kreations.

 

So, which cutting machine should YOU buy?

I’m in love with my Cricut Explore Air, but I know people who are equally happy with their Silhouette Cameo 3 or Sizzix Vagabond. If you have a friend with a cutting machine, try before you buy. If that’s not possible, Ken’s Kreations maintains a regularly updated Which Die-Cutting Machine Should I Buy? post that includes a lot of video tutorials where you can see different machines in action.

Think about your answers to the questions at the beginning of the post. Choose the machine that seems to be the best fit for your answers. And try it out as soon as you get it home! I can tell you from experience that letting a cutting machine sit around in a box just increases your anxiety about getting started.

If you have any questions about the Cricut Explore Air (or the other machines in the Cricut Explore series), let me know. I’d be happy to answer and help you in your machine comparison journey. I hope you find the perfect machine for you!

 

Crochet Pattern: Layered Button Cuff (with Tips for Organizing Your Button Collection)

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother’s button collection. In this post, I’ll share my organizing tips along with crafty product reviews and a free crochet pattern! With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Samples of several organizing products were provided to me by Deflecto. Although I accept free products for review, I do not accept additional compensation, nor do I guarantee a positive review. My reviews are based entirely on my honest opinions. Additional supplies for this post were generously provided by Wool and the Gang.

When my maternal grandmother passed away in 2007, I inherited her vast button collection. (Button collecting has not skipped a generation in my family, by the way. Both my mom and her youngest sister are big button collectors, too.) It was in this metal utility case which was heavy, not very visually appealing, and had squeaky drawers.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.From time to time, I would dip into the buttons but it was hard to find anything. My grandmother, like all of us, had her own secret methods for organizing and it was a bit hard for me to figure out. Also, the case was so heavy that I didn’t really ever want to move it around. Then, in January, I met the folks from Deflecto at Creativation, a trade show for the craft industry.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.Deflecto has been in the organization business for over 50 years, and, as you can see from their booth display, they design several products with crafters in mind. Deflecto sent me some products to try out at home, including Stackable Caddy Organizers (each of which comes with one Large Caddy Container, one Small Caddy Container, and one Medium Caddy Container), Caddy Containers, and the Wall Mounting Bars.

Let me start by saying that I was amazed that I could get everything in that huge utility box into one Stackable Caddy Organizer. (I configured it with one Large Caddy Container and three Small Caddy Containers). I spent about an afternoon doing this, but part of that involved reminiscing, so of course, you may be able to organize more quickly!

In the Large Caddy Container, I used four Ziploc Extra Small Square Containers (which stack neatly two-by-two) to organize groups of buttons that were loose but part of sets. I also included all of the random sewing tools that were a bit longer in this container. I then organized one Small Caddy Container to include all the loose buttons, one to include all the buttons that were on cards, and one for snaps, beads, and other findings. Since my grandmother’s entire collection fit into one Stackable Caddy Organizer, I was able to take it over to my mom’s for the afternoon and I can also easily move it around my apartment. I’m going to keep my own button collection separate (but that’s a post for another day!).

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

The handle has pieces on each side that can open outward to snap to another Stackable Caddy Organizer to lock together. Although Deflecto says each organizer can hold up to 40 pounds, with my back as it is, I decided to start small with just the one for traveling on the subway.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.Each side of the Stackable Caddy Organizer can fit one Large Caddy Container, three Small Caddy Containers, or one Medium and one Small Caddy Container.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.The Medium Caddy Containers just happen to be the perfect size for crochet hooks (even the jumbo sizes) and most scissors.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.You can keep the parts more secure by sliding the back piece of each Container into the slots on the Caddy Organizer.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.I didn’t try out the Wall Mounting Bars because we live in a rental apartment and don’t want to mess with the walls. But, I did want to show a picture of the Wall Mounting Bars in action (and demonstrate my Wonder Woman-esque powers of strength). Like the Caddy Organizers, there are ridges on the Wall Mounting Bars where the back piece of each Container can slide into.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

Each Container has a pop up closure on the front. I’ve been using these for about two months and haven’t had any problems yet, but I probably wouldn’t snap them open and closed 10 times a day, either.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.The Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizers are easy to use and stackable (obviously) with a “lift and lock” closure. The handle makes them portable enough to bring to craft night. I like the variety of Caddy Container sizes available. If you have a craft room, you could use the Caddy Containers and the Wall Mounting Bars to keep supplies for your current project ready while you’re working. Besides my grandmother’s button collection, I’ve been using the other samples to store small containers of paint, scissors, and colored pencils. MC has taken some for storing small tools, bolts, and screws. My only concerns about these are that the plastic can scratch and chip a bit in shipping (which doesn’t seem to have impacted functionality or strength) and how the pop up closures will hold up to heavy use in the long term (though I haven’t had any problems when using these for about two months).

Some Deflecto craft products are available for sale on Amazon, or you can find out where to buy them locally on Deflecto’s Craft Solutions web page.


So, now on to the crochet pattern! I used my newly organized button collection and some remnants of Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton yarn that were leftover from two patterns I’ll be posting on Monday to make this awesome Layered Button Cuff. It’s such a soft and luxurious cotton that it can’t be confined to a life of potholders and coasters (though it would make fabulous ones!).

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

I dug through the Small Caddy Organizer with the unmatched buttons until…

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.… I found some buttons that were paired harmoniously with the yarn colors.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.This Layered Button Cuff is the perfect way to use up the last bits of a soft, treasured yarn while putting some of your button collection on display. (And, if you don’t happen to be a button collector yet, I recommend getting started at Buttons Galore and More.)

If you make your own Layered Button Cuff, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter. You can also share a picture in the Underground Crafters Facebook group. Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a coupon code for your choice of one of my premium patterns and other subscriber goodies. Plus, you’ll never miss one of my free patterns again!

Add the Layered Button Cuff to your Ravelry favorites or queue.

Underground Crafter on RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Underground Crafter on Craftsy

Layered Button Cuff

Crochet Pattern by Underground Crafter

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

A soft cotton yarn and assorted buttons combine to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

 

Finished Size

  • Customizable. Photographed sample is Teen/Adult: 8” (20.5 cm) circumference x 1.75” (4.5 cm) width.

Materials

  • Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton yarn (100% Pima Cotton, 3.5 oz/100 g/155 yd/142 m) – 1 skein each in Out of Space Dyed – 101 Spots (CA) and Pink Lemonade (CB), or approximately 20 yd (18 m) in each of 2 colors in any medium weight cotton yarn.
  • US Size H-8/5 mm crochet hook, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Yarn or tapestry needle with eye small enough to sew through buttons.
  • 5-20 sew-through buttons.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

Gauge

  • 4 sc = 1.25” (3 cm) in pattern. Exact gauge is not critical for this pattern.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

  • CA – Color A
  • CB – Color B
  • ch – chain
  • rep – repeat
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • sp – space
  • st(s) – stitch(es)

Pattern Instructions

Cuff

Inner Layer

  • With CA, ch 5.
  • Row 1: Turn, sk 1 ch, sc in next ch and in each ch across. (4 sts)
  • Row 2: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st and in each st across.
  • Rep Row 2 until piece measures approximately 8” (20.5 cm) long, or desired wrist circumference. Fasten off CA.

Outer Layer

  • With CB, ch 9.
  • Row 1: Turn, sk 1 ch, sc in next ch, ch 1, sk 1 ch, sc in next 4 ch, ch 1, sk 1 ch, sc in next ch. (6 sts + 2 ch-1 sp)
  • Row 2: Turn, ch 1, sc in first st, ch 1, sk ch-1 sp, sc in next 4 sts, ch 1, sk ch-1 sp, sc in next st.
  • Rep Row 2 until piece is the same length as inner layer.

Form buttonhole

  • Row 3: Turn, sl st in each of first st, ch-1 sp, and next st, ch 3, sk 2 sts, sl st in ea of next st, ch-1 sp, and next st.
  • Row 4: Turn, sl st in each of next 3 sts, sl st in each of next 3 ch, sl st in each of next 3 sts. Fasten off with long yarn tail approximately 32” (81.5 cm) long for seaming.

Assembly

  • With yarn needle, weave in ends on Inner Layer and yarn tail from foundation chain on Outer Layer. With yarn needle, weave long yarn tail on Outer Layer so that it is positioned in first ch-1 sp near buttonhole.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

  • Place Inner Layer on top of Outer Layer, centered between chain spaces. With yarn needle and long yarn tail, seam the pieces together along the long edges by picking up the sides of rows of Inner Layer and pulling yarn through corresponding ch-1 sp on Outer Layer. Alternate moving the needle from bottom to top and then from top to bottom.
  • After first side is seamed, use yarn tail to weave across to other ch-1 sp, working on wrong side (underside) of Outer Layer. Repeat seam on other side. When pieces are joined, use yarn needle to weave in ends.
  • Position buttons on top of Inner Layer until you are satisfied.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

  • Set buttons down in the order you plan to sew them to the cuff. Test to ensure that the first button to be attached will fit through the buttonhole.

Free crochet pattern: Layered Button Cuff in Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton by Underground Crafter | After 10 years, I finally organized my grandmother's button collection using a Deflecto Stackable Caddy Organizer. With buttons now at the ready, I used a soft cotton yarn to make a fun accessory. Make it your own by changing up yarn colors or using different styles of buttons.

  • Starting with a piece of CB measuring approximately 25” (63.5 cm) – and leaving approximately 5” (13 cm) of slack at one end to weave in later – begin sewing on first button at opposite end from buttonhole. Sew each button on using yarn needle to move through button eyes. Secure by weaving yarn through the wrong side (underside) of Outer Layer between each button. Continue until all buttons are attached.
  • Weave in ends securely.

Finishing

  • With yarn needle, weave in ends.
© 2017 by Marie Segares (Underground Crafter). This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Marie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2017/07/13/crochet-pattern-layered-button-cuff. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

If you make your own Layered Button Cuff, I’d love to see it! Share your progress and questions by tagging me on Facebook as @Underground Crafter, Instragram as @ucrafter, or Twitter as @ucrafter. You can also share a picture in the Underground Crafters Facebook group. Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a coupon code for your choice of one of my premium patterns and other subscriber goodies. Plus, you’ll never miss one of my free patterns again!

Add the Layered Button Cuff to your Ravelry favorites or queue.

Underground Crafter on RavelryIf you want an easy print format, you can buy an ad-free PDF version on Craftsy.

Underground Crafter on Craftsy

Cricut Explore Air Review

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground Crafter

Back in April, I went to the Snap! Conference for creative bloggers and I had my first in-person experiences with electronic cutting machines. I had been peripherally aware of the existence of die cutting machines for years, but it wasn’t until Snap! that I discovered these machines had jumped into the electronic era and that they could cut a broad range of materials (that is, not just paper).

This post contains affiliate links. This post is sponsored by Cricut but all opinions and thoughts are my own.

After I came home, the whole electronic cutting thing was like a jingle I couldn’t get out of my head. I stared at machines while at Michaels, I started following new blogs, I had project ideas floating around in my mind, and I even squirreled away a few dollars for a machine. But then some other things came up and I had to put that idea on hold.

A few months later, I heard about HGTV Magazine’s Blogger Block Party, and I was asked to write a post about it in exchange for products from some of the event sponsors. I saw that Cricut was on the list of sponsors and I crossed my fingers. On the hottest day of the summer, a giant box arrived, and my electronic cutting machine dreams came true. The folks at Cricut were quite generous. In addition to a Cricut Explore Air, there was another entire box filled with accessories.

Once the box showed up, I’ll admit I got a little nervous. After all, I had never actually used an electronic cutting machine on my own. At Snap!, all the booths with electronic or die cutting activities had someone there to walk me through the steps. But once I actually opened the box, I wasn’t intimidated anymore.

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground CrafterAs soon as you open the box lid, you’ll find the Start Here folder. And, the folks at Cricut understand what it’s like to live in a house with two black cats because the Cricut Explore Air is wrapped up in a storage bag inside of the box.

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground Crafter
Hmmm, what’s inside the bag?

Although the machine is wrapped up very securely, the packaging isn’t the type that you have to struggle against. Everything is easy to open (and just as easy to pack up again, if you’d like to store your machine in the box when it’s not in use).

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground CrafterThe machine itself looks like a very wide inkjet printer from the outside.

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground CrafterOnce I opened the Start Here folder, I found supplies and very clear instructions for my first project. Although you can, of course, make another project to start, I liked that this project walked me through the writing and cutting that the machine can do.

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground CrafterI decided to use Cricut Design Space on my laptop, but there’s also an iPad option. Within minutes of opening the machine, I was done with my very first solo electronic cutting machine project.

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground CrafterI was worried that I would tear up the cardstock while removing the small circles that were cut, but everything came off smoothly when I followed the instructions.

Cricut Explore Air unboxing and review on Underground CrafterAs someone who actually had a rotary dial phone during my lifetime, I loved this nostalgic card. MC and I spent a few minutes ooh-ing and aah-ing over the precision, and then we were on to the next project!

Now that I’ve told you my Cricut story, let me share my review of the Explore Air. It’s easy to use straight out of the box and there are tons of designs to choose using Cricut Access, so even if you aren’t confident with designing yet, you can make a lot of great projects as a newbie.

So far, I’ve cut intricate designs from cardstock and vinyl with ease. The dial also has options for paper, iron on, light cardstock, fabric, poster board, and custom materials, and the machine cuts over 60 different craft materials. I love that the Explore Air can write with Cricut pens, which are really easy to attach and change out. (The Explore Air comes with a silver pen.) The machine is quieter than my laser printer and it moves surprisingly fast. Although it has a Bluetooth option, I’ve only used it with the USB so far. Although the machine itself isn’t that large, you do need to have about 10″ (25.5 cm) clearance in the front and back when you are using the machine to allow it to move the cutting mat back and forth. (So, yep, you do need to clean off your desk before starting a project.)

I also loved that the support hotline number is printed clearly on the Start Here materials and if you stop a job mid-cut, Cricut Design Space will ask if you need help and the hotline number will pop up. I honestly can’t think of the last time I bought an electronic device that encouraged me to use the phone if I had questions. Although the sticker price of the machine is $299.99, it’s often on sale for less and you don’t have to buy dies like you would with the older machines. In other words, you’re paying up front for a lot of projects. The Design Space software is free to use online and you can choose whether to save your projects publicly or privately. There are free fonts you can use to write or cut and there are daily free images, and of course, you can design your own project, pay for images and projects on an individual basis, or subscribe to Cricut Access for $9.99/month (month-to-month) or $7.99/month (for an annual membership).

I’m really excited about using my Explore Air to make customized holiday cards and gift wrap this year, but there are so many more uses for it! Because it’s so simple to use, it also makes a great gift.

You can buy the Explore Air from Cricut, Jo-Ann, Amazon, and Michaels.

Since I’m new to the world of Cricut, if you’re an existing user, tell me about your favorite projects to make!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.