DIY Felted Balls Tutorial | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.In today’s #TipsTuesday post, I’m going to show you how to make your own felted balls from wool yarn. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects. (Spoiler alert: I’ll be sharing a project using felted balls later this week, so you may want to get started on making a set.)

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Gather your materials.

You’ll need 100% wool yarn (I used Lion Brand Alpine Wool in Chili and Lion Brand LB Collection Pure Wool yarn), stockings, and access to a washer and dryer.

Wind your yarn balls.

First, you’ll wrap the yarn around your fingers several times.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.

Then, slide the yarn off your fingers and begin wrapping yarn around the center.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Fold over the yarn and continue to wrap until it forms an irregular sphere.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Once you have a sphere, continue wrapping in different directions until you have normalized the shape.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.For dryer balls, you’ll want to make the balls several inches large in diameter. I recommend using undyed yarn for best results. For craft projects, you’ll want smaller balls that are less than an inch in diameter.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Prepare your yarn balls for felting.

Once you have as many balls as you’d like (or you’ve run out of yarn), begin stuffing them into the stocking towards the foot. Tie a knot after each ball.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.Felt your yarn balls.

You’ll want to wash your tied yarn balls on hot in a lightly filled load of laundry for maximum agitation. I washed them with denims and sheets, but not with towels or other yarn projects that would generate a lot of lint. After washing, you’ll want to tumble dry these on high. I actually put these in the washer and dryer a few times to make sure they felted completely. Once your balls are felted, little fuzzies will stick out of the stockings.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.At that point, you can release your felted balls by cutting off the knot and sliding out the next felted ball and continuing until they are all released from the stocking.

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.You now have your very own collection of felted balls! What will you use yours for?

DIY Felted Balls Tutorial by Underground Crafter | Make your own felted balls from wool yarn with this tutorial. Felted balls can be used instead of dryer sheets or for craft projects.

3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf with 17 Free Crochet Patterns to Inspire You via Underground CrafterAs the weather cools down, it turns into prime time for displaying our crocheted creations. With the Craft Yarn Council reporting that 86% of crocheters list scarves as their favorite projects, there’s a good chance you have quite a few in your closet. Are you looking for a new way to wear your scarf? In this tutorial, I’ll share 3 different ways to wear a rectangular scarf. These styles will add new life to your old favorites or create a signature look with your latest creation. (By the way, I’m using the Skinny Minny Scarf in the tutorial photos. You can get the free crochet pattern with video here. And, if you’re looking for more inspiration, I included a roundup with 16 more free crochet patterns for rectangular scarves at the end of this tutorial.)

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Photos are copyright the respective designer/publisher and are used with permission.


3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf

Style 1: Inspired by a Necktie

This is a great unisex look that keeps your neck cozy but also allows the longer edges of the scarf to hang down. This style is great for very long scarves that you want to keep from dangling down too low on your body.

3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf with 17 Free Crochet Patterns to Inspire You via Underground Crafter - Inspired by a Necktie

  • Step 1: Start by centering the scarf at the back of your neck with the ends hanging down in the front.
  • Step 2: Tie a knot in each in each side. Leave one knot loose.
  • Step 3: Insert the side with the tighter knot into the looser knot.
  • Step 4: Adjust both sides until you have the look you’d like and then tighten up the knot. Style with the knot towards the center.

Style 2: Campus Coed

This trendy style works well with long as well as wide rectangular scarves.

3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf with 17 Free Crochet Patterns to Inspire You via Underground Crafter - Campus Coed

  • Step 1: Start by centering the scarf at the back of your neck. Wrap both ends around to the back.
  • Step 2: Bring one end of the scarf to the front. Insert the side into the wrapped loop at the other side of your neck.

3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf with 17 Free Crochet Patterns to Inspire You via Underground Crafter - Campus Coed

  • Step 3: Bring the other end of the scarf to the front. Insert the side into the wrapped loop at the other side of your neck.
  • Step 4: Adjust both sides…
  • Step 5: …until you have the desired look.

Style 3: Knotty Girl

This style works best with scarves made from fibers that hold their shape well, like wool and acrylic, since the twisting can stretch out other fibers like cotton and alpaca. It transforms any scarf into an accent scarf that can be worn indoors all day.

3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf with 17 Free Crochet Patterns to Inspire You via Underground Crafter - Knotty Girl

  • Step 1: Start by centering the scarf at the back of your neck with the ends hanging down in front.
  • Step 2: Twist one side of the scarf until it is almost ready to curl.
  • Step 3: Wrap the twisted end of the scarf around towards the back of your neck…

3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf with 17 Free Crochet Patterns to Inspire You via Underground Crafter - Knotty Girl

  • Step 4: …bringing it back to the front.
  • Step 5: Tie the twisted end to the long end at the front and begin twisting the long end.
  • Step 6: Tie the ends together several times…
  • Step 7: …until you reach the desired length. Style the knots off center.

With these tutorials, you even create 3 different looks from the same scarf! But, if you decide you prefer one style with a particular scarf, just loosen the knots around your neck and pull the scarf off gently. Hang the scarf up knotted on a hanger to make it easier to style the scarf when you’re on the go next time.

Now that you have some styling ideas, find your next project in this roundup of free crochet patterns for rectangular scarves!

Roundup: 16 Free Crochet Patterns for Rectangular Scarves

3 Ways to Tie a Rectangular Scarf with 17 Free Crochet Patterns to Inspire You via Underground Crafter - crochet pattern collageTop row, from left to right:

Second row, from left to right:

Third row, from left to right:

Bottom row, from left to right:

If you’re still on the hunt for the perfect scarf pattern, check out this roundup with 50+ more free crochet, knitting, and fabric scarf patterns.

 

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

As the weather starts cooling down and we head into winter, many crocheters and knitters start ramping up their projects. If you’ve vowed that this is the year where you will wear your own handmade creations rather than store bought, let me share 4 tips for planning a season’s worth of wearable accessories. Oh, and in case that isn’t enough to get you inspired, I’ve also included a roundup of 36 free crochet and knitting patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags! Read on for more tips so you can DIY.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Photos are copyright the respective designer/publisher and are used with permission.

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories

1) Be real about your clothing

As you think ahead to the next season, consider your own wardrobe staples. What outfits, colors, and styles do you actually wear on a regular basis? If your style is eclectic, that’s wonderful! But, if you know you’ll probably wear the same t-shirt and pair of jeans every Saturday, don’t imagine you’ll suddenly be wearing ballerina dresses this winter instead.

On the other hand, if you’ve recently lost or gained weight, switched jobs, or have had other life changes that mean it’s time to go clothes shopping, consider building some outfits around special accessories that you’d love to wear on a regular basis.

Once you have an idea of what you’ll be wearing in the next season, you can choose accessories projects to wear with those outfits.

2) Select projects

With your clothing in mind, look through patterns and choose accessories that will fit in with your lifestyle and your local climate. Some options for wearable accessories include socks, hats, scarves or cowls, shawls, and bags. (At the end of these tips, you can find 36 great pattern suggestions to get you started!) Once you have your projects chosen, you can start a shopping list of yarn and supplies you’ll need.

3) Choose colors carefully

To get the most wear out of your new handmade accessories collection, choose colors that compliment or contrast the staples in your wardrobe. While it’s tempting to choose neutral colors that (theoretically) match everything, if you prefer bold vibrant colors, this is not a good strategy. Think about not just the actual colors you like, but the type of color. Do you like bold colors or ones that are more faded? Are you a fan of jewel tones or pastels or earth tones? Do you like your outfits to coordinate or would you prefer your accessories to add a pop of color to the rest of what you’re wearing? Do you want your accessories to be solid, or would you prefer stripes, multicolor yarns, or color blocked projects?

If you’d like your handmade accessories to follow seasonal fashion trends, take a look at the latest Pantone fashion color report, which is usually available about six months in advance. Once you have a better idea of the types of colors you want to wear, you can start matching projects to yarn.

4) Start early

If you want to get the most use out of your accessories during the season, start crocheting and knitting as early as possible. This allows you to work at a reasonable pace and still finish in time to wear your creations. If you can’t get started early, or life just gets too busy, aim to finish one versatile project that you can get a lot of wear out of during the season.

Crochet Scarves

36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns for Wearable Accessories

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Now that you have a plan for making your own seasonal accessories collection, here are 36 free crochet and knitting pattern suggestions to help inspire you to get started for the fall and winter!

Socks (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Hats (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Scarves and Cowls (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Shawls and Wraps (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

Bags (clockwise from top left)

4 Tips for Planning a Season’s Closet of Wearable Accessories with 36 Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns to Get You Started via Underground Crafter | Wear your own handmade accessories this fall or winter. Get inspired with these free patterns for socks, hats, scarves and cowls, shawls and wraps, and bags!

If you enjoyed this roundup, you can find 50 more ideas for handmade scarves and cowls here!

Before You Say “I Can’t Knit (Or Crochet),” Ask Yourself These 4 Questions by Sarah Dawn’s Designs | #TipsTuesday

Before You Say, "I Can't Knit (or Crochet)," Ask Yourself These 4 Questions | Guest post by Sarah Dawn's Designs for Underground CrafterLet’s give a warm welcome to Sarah Dawn, the knitting designer behind Sarah Dawn’s Designs, who is joining us for #TipsTuesday to remind you that you CAN knit (or crochet). Sarah Dawn is going to ask you some questions and share some tips that will convince you, even if you’ve been turned off from these crafts in the past.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

About Sarah Dawn

Sarah Dawn has been fascinated by knitting since first learning how to knit at the age of 5, and loving (almost all of) it. When she’s not knitting, she’s teaching herself to crochet and spin. Beyond yarn, her other vices include earl grey tea, and curling up with a good book.

Currently, she lives in the Toronto, Ontario, Canada, area, along with her roommate and two cats. She finds this whole ‘write about yourself in the third person’ thing rather awkward, but it seems to work out alright.

Show your support by visiting Sarah Dawn at one of the following links:

Sarah Dawn’s Designs on Ravelry | Facebook | G+ | SarahDawns on Ravelry | Pinterest | Blog | Etsy | Patreon

Before You Say “I Can’t Knit (Or Crochet),” Ask Yourself These 4 Question

Guest Post by Sarah Dawn’s Designs

Before You Say, "I Can't Knit (or Crochet)," Ask Yourself These 4 Questions | Guest post by Sarah Dawn's Designs for Underground Crafter

Hello from Sarah Dawn, of Sarah Dawn’s Designs!

So, I’m an avid proponent of knitting and crocheting in public. I knit just about everywhere – on the subway, on the bus, in meetings, wherever I want something to do and something to keep my hands busy. Knitting, as I’ve written elsewhere, is actually my version of a fidget toy. In doing all this knitting in public, I encounter a lot of people who also love to knit and/or crochet*. But, sadly, I also encounter a lot of people who want to knit but think they can’t, or used to knit and now think they can’t.

It’s sad, because I’m a strong proponent of the fact that anyone, and yes, I mean anyone, can knit! It’s all about finding the right tools, the right techniques, and the best way for you to knit and crochet.

And I’m going to walk you through a couple of different things to examine, before you throw up your hands and say “I can’t.” Because I promise you, you can! It’s just a matter of finding what works for you.

1: Look at your tools.

For example, I used to hate crochet. I was clumsy with it, and it wasn’t very good, and I didn’t like doing it. Then, I made the switch from metal to wooden crochet hooks, and it became much easier! I now work exclusively with thin wooden hooks, and my crochet has improved, and it’s so much more enjoyable! Different tools work with different people’s hands and styles. I’ve found for myself, with small hands but a strong grip strength, I like metal thinner needles and hooks, but wooden thicker ones. Experiment with different materials and shapes in your tools (for example, square knitting needles are a thing, and so are needles made from all sorts of different woods!).

Before You Say, "I Can't Knit (or Crochet)," Ask Yourself These 4 Questions | Guest post by Sarah Dawn's Designs for Underground Crafter
Star Stitch Mittens, knitting pattern by Sarah Dawn’s Designs.

2: Look at your style.

In knitting, I’m a weird hybrid of English knitting, but I don’t tension my yarn much at all! I don’t know my crochet style, except that everyone who’s ever seen me crochet has said that ‘it’s weird’. I hold a hook sort of like a pencil, but then I use my index and middle fingers to operate it in the same way I knit. Point is, if one style of knitting or crocheting doesn’t suit your hands, research another one that might! There are no knitting or crochet police – do what you need to to keep your hands comfortable!

Before You Say, "I Can't Knit (or Crochet)," Ask Yourself These 4 Questions | Guest post by Sarah Dawn's Designs for Underground Crafter

3: Look at techniques.

This is where you have to have some comfort with your chosen craft. But, it’s also the most flexible. When I was young, I never learned the SSK stitch. I only found out relatively recently that what I thought was an SSK is, in, fact, k2togtbl (knit 2 together through back loops). And I find k2togtbl so much easier! I’ve still never managed SSK. The differences between the stitches are miniscule. When I was knitting the samples for my Snowdrop Lace Cowl, for example, I used k2togtbl for the left-leaning decreases. I figure if anyone’s looking that closely at my neck, that they can see the slight difference, there are bigger problems.

Before You Say, "I Can't Knit (or Crochet)," Ask Yourself These 4 Questions | Guest post by Sarah Dawn's Designs for Underground Crafter
Snowdrop Lace Cowl, knitting pattern by Sarah Dawn’s Designs.

4: When trying to determine what to modify and substitute, sit down and think about what the biggest barrier to your crafting is.

  • Is it time? That might be then be best addressed by choice of project – maybe your crafting personality is best suited to small, quick crochets and knits in big yarn.
  • Is it a physical barrier, like arthritis, or mobility issues in your hands? Look at alternate needle sizes, shapes and materials. Knooking is suggested for people who have limited or no use of one hand, or, there’s a knitting style which tucks one needle under the arm. Even just a YouTube search for ‘one-handed knitting’ comes back with lots of tutorials!
  • It is a specific technique? Then find out what the purpose of that technique is. If the pattern is calling for one stretchy cast on, it doesn’t mean you have to use the cast-on specified – look for a different, but still stretchy cast on. If the pattern is calling for k2togtbl as a left-leaning decrease, maybe do an ssk, or a sl1, k1, psso decrease, instead.

Substitution requires research and knowledge of yourself. But, I promise, as someone who’s had to do substitutions for techniques that are impossible for me (toe-up-cast-on, I’m looking at you!), it actually makes your knitting far more enjoyable, and far more unique! And, after reading this primer, if you’re still not sure about substitution styles, techniques, or tools, drop me a line and I’ll be glad to give you a hand!

*for the crocheters: most of my examples are knitting specific, since I’m still a far better knitter then crocheter. I’m working on getting better at it, now that I’ve found hooks that don’t hurt my hands!

© 2017 by Sarah Dawn (Sarah Dawn’s Designs) and published with permission by Underground Crafter. If you want to share these tips, point your friends to this link: PATTERN LINK. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Thank you, Sarah Dawn, for sharing these helpful tips with us! Show your support by visiting Sarah Dawn at one of the following links:

Sarah Dawn’s Designs on Ravelry | Facebook | G+ | SarahDawns on Ravelry | Pinterest | Blog | Etsy | Patreon

How To Finger Crochet (+ 8 Free Patterns) | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. I’ll show you the basics in this photo tutorial and I’ll share a roundup of 8 free finger crochet patterns to get you started.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Materials for this post were generously provided by Lion Brand.

Since your fingers are relatively thick when compared to most crochet hooks, start with bulky or super bulky yarns. I used Lion Brand Heartland Thick & Quick that was leftover from the Coastal Redwood Super Scarf for this tutorial. Children can start with medium weight yarns, since their fingers are smaller. (For more ideas for teaching children to crochet, read 10 Tips for Teaching Children to Crochet.)

How To Finger Crochet

Tutorial by Underground Crafter

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

1) Start with a slip knot.

Once you have your yarn selected, start with a slip knot on the forefinger of your dominant hand (i.e., with your right hand if you’re a righty or your left hand if you’re a lefty). Leave the slip knot loose.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

2) Make a foundation chain.

With your other hand, wrap the yarn over your forefinger from back to front. This step is like a yarn over (yo) in standard crochet.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Bend your forefinger and draw the yarn through the loop already on your finger. You may need to use your other hand to help pull the yarn through.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

You’ve made a chain!

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Continue these steps until the foundation chain is as long as you’d like for your project. Keep your stitches loose so that it’s easy for your fingers to work through them.

Crochet Amigurumi

3) Make single crochet stitches

Skip the first chain. (The loop on your finger doesn’t count as a chain, so skip the first one that’s off your finger.) This step is like skipping the turning chain (t-ch) in standard crochet.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Insert your forefinger into the next chain.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

With your other hand, wrap the yarn over your forefinger.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Draw the yarn through the first loop on your forefinger. You should still have two loops on your finger.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

With your other hand, wrap the yarn over your forefinger.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Pull the yarn through both loops on your finger. You’ve made a single crochet!

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Insert your forefinger into the next chain. With your other hand, wrap the yarn over your forefinger. Draw the yarn through the first loop on your forefinger. You should still have two loops on your finger. With your other hand, wrap the yarn over your forefinger. Pull the yarn through both loops on your finger. Repeat these steps across until you have a row of single crochet stitches.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

To make the next row of single crochet stitches, turn.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Make a chain by wrapping the yarn over your forefinger…

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

and draw the yarn through the loop on your forefinger.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Repeat the steps for working a single crochet by inserting your forefinger in the next (first) stitch.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

With your other hand, wrap the yarn over your forefinger.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Draw the yarn through the first loop on your forefinger. You should still have two loops on your finger.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

With your other hand, wrap the yarn over your forefinger.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Pull the yarn through both loops on your finger.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

Repeat these steps until you have as many of single crochet stitches as you need for your project.

How To Finger Crochet by Underground Crafter | Finger crochet is a great way to enjoy crochet when you don’t have a hook on hand (or, when your hook isn’t the right size for your yarn). It’s also a great way to teach crochet, since your fingers only have to focus on the mechanics of the stitches and not on how to hold the hook. Learn the basics in this photo tutorial.

When you’re ready to finish off your project, cut the yarn, leaving about 5” (13 cm) of yarn tail. Draw that short end through the last loop on your finger to finish off. Use a yarn needle or crochet hook to weave in the yarn tails.

Are you ready to make some finger crochet projects? Here are eight ideas to get you started.