Crochet Lace Guide: An Introduction to 7 Types of Crochet Lace | #Crochet #TipsTuesday

Crochet Lace Guide: An Introduction to 7 Types of Crochet Lace by Underground Crafter with links to patterns and tutorials in broomstick lace, Bruges lace, filet crochet, hairpin lace, Irish crochet lace, pineapple stitch lace, and Tunisian crochet lace,A few weeks ago, I shared four tips to keep you crocheting in the heat of summer, and today, I’m adding another: working with crochet lace.

Summer is the perfect time to explore the many varieties of crochet lace. You can make stunning projects and learn new skills at the same time! In this post, I’ll be talking about seven different types of lace and sharing patterns, tutorials, books, and classes to help you get started.

This post contains affiliate links. All pattern images are copyright the respective designer and are used with permission.

Broomstick Lace

Broomstick lace is made using a broomstick handle or large knitting needle and a crochet hook. Get started with my free crochet pattern and tutorial, Quadrilateral: A Broomstick Lace Shawl.

Quadrilateral, a broomstick lace shawl, free crochet pattern and step-by-step photo tutorial by Underground Crafter.
Quadrilateral, a broomstick lace shawl, free crochet pattern and step-by-step photo tutorial by Underground Crafter.

You can take your broomstick lace to the next level in the Craftsy class, Beyond Basic Broomstick Lace, or with Donna Wolfe’s book, Broomstick Lace Crochet: A New Look at a Vintage Stitch with 20 Stylish Designs.

To learn more about broomstick lace, check out these posts:

Bruges Lace

Bruges lace, or Bruges crochet, mimics a style of lacework made famous in the Belgian city of Bruges. Learn Bruges Lace by Ellen Gormley is a great resource, or you can take her online class, Learn to Crochet Lace: Hairpin, Broomstick, and Bruges.

You may also enjoy the Bruges Lace Napkin Ring, a free crochet pattern by StitchesNScraps.

Bruges Lace Napkin Ring by StitchesNScrapsFilet Crochet

Filet crochet is a beginner-friendly type of lace using double crochet and chain stitches to form mesh. Filet crochet can be used to create simple or intricate designs. More intricate patterns are usually charted. If you’re new to filet crochet, use Kim Guzman’s tutorials to get started.

Crochet Lace Guide: An Introduction to 7 Types of Crochet Lace by Underground Crafter with links to patterns and tutorials in broomstick lace, Bruges lace, filet crochet, hairpin lace, Irish crochet lace, pineapple stitch lace, and Tunisian crochet lace,Or, try these four free filet crochet patterns! Clockwise from upper left corner:

Hairpin Lace

Hairpin lace is a technique where you create loops using a tool sometimes called a hairpin lace loom. This method takes a bit of getting used to since you have to hold an extra item in your hands, but it’s surprisingly simple once you get started. You can learn more about hairpin lace and find links to four free tutorials for beginners in this post, or in this tutorial by Celeste (Shellie) Dunn on AllFreeCrochet.

My favorite hairpin lace tool is the one made by Clover. I shared a detailed review here.

Hairpin lace1
A project on my Clover Hair Pin Lace Tool.

Irish Crochet Lace

Irish crochet lace was developed in the mid-1800s as an inexpensive alternative to Venetian lacework. It was taught by nuns to women throughout Ireland as a form of economic development.

So, what characterizes Irish crochet lace? Typically, motifs are crocheted and then joined on a mesh or lacy background.

The Mayapple Flower Square is one of my most popular free crochet patterns. The center flower is inspired by the traditional Irish crochet rose.

Mayapple Flower 6" Square, free #crochet pattern by Marie Segares @ucrafterIf you’re new to Irish crochet, my favorite resource is The Go-To Book of Irish Crochet Motifs by Kathryn White. (You can read my review here.)

If you’re ready to try an Irish lace garment, you may enjoy Myra Wood’s Learn Irish Freeform Crochet class on Craftsy.

Pineapple Stitch Lace

The pineapple stitch is a common vintage lace motif with many variations. It’s one of my personal favorite forms of crochet lace. I have several free crochet patterns featuring pineapple stitches including…

Picnic Basket Shawl, free #crochet pattern by Marie Segares in 4 parts with video #tutorial. Available at http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/picnic2015
Picnic Basket Shawl, a free crochet pattern that includes helpful video tutorials.
500 pix Pineapples for Everyone free pattern
Pineapples for Everyone Shawl, a free crochet pattern with helpful progress photos.
Tweedy Pineapples Scarf, free crochet pattern by Marie Segares/Underground Crafter
Tweedy Pineapples Scarf, a free crochet pattern.

I guess it isn’t really a form of lace, but rather a stitch pattern variation. But it’s a very fun way of playing with lace stitches!

Classic Crochet Openwork
Pineapple stitches are just one type of crochet lace in Jennifer Hansen’s Classic Crochet Openwork class on Craftsy. The class also covers filet crochet, Irish and Bruges lace, hairpin lace, and Solomon’s knot.

Tunisian Crochet Lace

While some people associate Tunisian crochet with a bulkier fabric, it can actually be used to make beautiful lace. If you’re new to Tunisian crochet, it’s a method using a specialized crochet hook with a stopper on the end because loops are left on the hook for the first part, or “forward” pass, of each row. These loops are then worked off in the second part, or “return pass” of each row.

Kim Guzman has done a lot of work to popularize Tunisian crochet lace. You can take her online Tunisian Cables & Lace class, and sometimes find her wonderful (but out-of-print) book, Learn to Do Tunisian Lace Stitches, used on Amazon. Although it isn’t lace-specific, you can find many lacy stitches in her Tunisian Crochet Stitch Guide, too.

What’s your favorite form of crochet lace?

 

 

Recent Crochet Book Reviews on CGOA Blog

You may know that I volunteer to review crochet books on the Crochet Guild of America‘s blog, CGOA Now!  In 2013, most of my book reviews have been published there.  Here are the links in case you missed the reviews.

This post contains affiliate links.

crochet-saved-my-life1

Crochet Saved My Life: The Mental and Physical Health Benefits of Crochet by Kathryn Vercillo of Crochet Concupiscence

CGOA blog review * interview 1 * interview 2 * mini interview

 

 

Crocheting with Lucy Loop

Crocheting with Lucy Loop by Karen D. Thompson of Hooksations

CGOA blog review

 

 

Learn to Crochet Socks for the Family

Learn to Crochet Socks for the Family by Darla Sims

CGOA blog review

 

 

tunisian cables to crochet

Tunisian Cables to Crochet by Kim Guzman

CGOA blog review * interview

 

 

Tunisian Crochet Stitch Guide

Tunisian Crochet Stitch Guide by Kim Guzman

CGOA blog review

 

 

Ultimate guide to thread crochet

Ultimate Guide to Thread Crochet by Leisure Arts

CGOA blog review

 

Enjoy!

Interview with Kim Guzman, a.k.a. CrochetKim

I am so incredibly pleased to share an interview with Kim Guzman today.  As a lover of Tunisian crochet and a member of the very active Yahoo group that she co-moderates with Angela “ARNie” Grabowskitunisiancrochet, I’ve been a big fan of Kim’s work for years.  (Kim also does a lot of “regular” crochet design, too, as she discusses in this recent blog post.)

Kim is incredibly prolific as a designer, author, and teacher, and always seems to me to be the hardest working woman in show (er, um, yarn) business.  Yet if you are active on Crochetville, Ravelry, or almost any other social network where crochet is being discussed, you have probably interacted with Kim, who is very generous about sharing tips, advice, and her knowledge of crochet.

You can find Kim online through her main website (which links to her Crochet Kim/free pattern website and her Kimane Designs/self-published pattern website) and her blog, WIPs ‘n Chains.  Kim’s free videos can be found on her YouTube page and on the website of the new crochet magazine, Crochet 1-2-3 here.  She also teaches online classes at Annie’s and Crochetville.  Kim is also on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, and Ravelry (as crochetkim, in her group, and on her designer page).  All pictures are used with Kim’s permission and, unless otherwise noted, are copyright Kim Guzman.

 

Kim Guzman.

Underground Crafter (UC): How did you first get started crocheting?

Kim: When I was about 9 years’ old, my parents joined the Army together. During their basic training, my sister and I stayed with my grandparents. It was quite a long stay with grandparents and I believe that she taught us to crochet just to give us something to do while away from home. She started us off with granny squares and I learned from verbal instruction only. It wasn’t until I was about 18 years old that I purchased my first patterns. I wasn’t even aware of patterns and had been designing my own for all that time.

 

Sunday Best Sweater, one of Kim’s self-published designs.

UC: When were you first introduced to Tunisian crochet, and how did you come to work with it so often?

Kim: In about 2000, Darla Fanton had turned the crochet world on its ears with her double-ended Tunisian crochet designs. She did a lot of books, but the publishers wanted more. Annie’s Attic sent me some double-ended hooks and asked me to try my hand at double-ended Tunisian. I had never done it before, but I immediately set to work. My double-ended designs weren’t accepted. I found that I preferred the look of regular one-sided Tunisian and I had three books commissioned within six months.

 

 

Kansas City Cowl. Photo (c) Caron.

UC: What inspired you to start designing?

Kim: I have been designing since I learned to crochet. It was at least 10 years of crocheting before I sat down with a pattern and taught myself how to read it. Not knowing about patterns was the key to my “no fear” attitude toward design. My grandmother’s doilies inspired me to design my own when I was only 10 years’ old.

 

Lacy Bobbles Scarf and Wristlets. Photo (c) DRG Publishing (Annie’s).

UC: Where do you generally find your creative inspiration?

Kim: My creative inspiration is usually in the yarn itself. I bond with a yarn for awhile by swatching with it. When I come up with a stitch pattern and drape that I find pleasing, I bond with it awhile until it tells me what it wants to be. While I do browse the internet and catalogs for trendy clothing, I don’t usually have the ability to see something in fabric and be able to translate their shapes into crochet. Well, I take that back. I don’t usually find myself doing that. But, publishers will sometimes choose a photo of something in a pleasing shape and then ask that I translate that shape or construction into crochet. It’s design-on-demand. I never feel like my design-on-demand work is very good. It doesn’t come from the heart.

 

 

Cabled Mitts from the Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Tunisian Crochet. Photo (c) Leisure Arts.

UC: Your four latest books, the Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Tunisian Crochet, Tunisian Cables to CrochetShort Row Tunisian Fashion, and the forthcoming Tunisian Crochet Stitch Guide, all focus on Tunisian crochet. What was the design process like for these books?

Kim: You act as if I’m organized. ha! I am the furthest thing from organized.

For the Beginner’s Guide, I thought about yarns and projects. I thought about beginner projects and intermediate projects. And, I just started crocheting and writing. I put every little trick I know about Tunisian crochet in that book. It includes things normally not found in Tunisian crochet books like seaming horizontally or vertically, how to change colors, how to work with a lot of colors, step-by-step on how to felt projects and so much more. Everything that I had seen over the years which I had seen caused some questions. Even how to work with a self-striping yarn so that wide pieces of the body of a garment match the same sort of striping in the upper pieces around the arms and neck is included. It was the very first time I was given full control over what went into the book and I went all out.  (UC comment: I highly recommend this book for Tunisian crochet newbies!  You can read my review on the Crochet Guild of America’s blog here.  Ravelry members can see all the projects from this book here.)

 

Dublin Owl Hat and Mitts from Tunisian Cables to Crochet. Photo (c) Annie’s.

For the Cables book, I did it right after I finished my Tunisian Crochet Stitch Guide.  (UC note: This book is expected to be published in March.)  When I was working on the stitch guide, I did a swatch of a cable, then I did another, and another. I had about 10 cables in next to no time. I wanted to somehow keep the cables together, but I had already done the required number of stitch patterns for the Stitch Guide (65). This would have put me over the expected number by ten, so I decided to pull those cable stitch patterns from my proposed stitch patterns and create a separate book. Since the cables required special instruction, I didn’t want to put them in a book with only charted stitch patterns. I wanted them to have a further instruction.  (UC comment: Ravelry members can see all the projects from this book here.)

 

Sapphire Wrap from Short Row Tunisian Fashion. Photo (c) Leisure Arts.

In Short Row Tunisian Fashion, which is currently available in hard copy and download, I have six projects which use the short row technique in Tunisian. But, the real surprise is the crescent wrap which includes a pineapple stitch pattern. No, not a regular crochet pineapple stitch pattern. It’s Tunisian crochet from start to finish. I believe it to be the first ever published pineapple stitch pattern in Tunisian crochet.  (UC comment: Ravelry members can see all the projects from this book here.)

Then, in March, my new Stitch Guide will be available. It’s already available on Amazon for pre-order. I’ve never done a full stitch pattern book before. But, I’m especially pleased with it because, although there are some classic Tunisian crochet stitch patterns, most of them are completely out of my head. I wanted a charted book and this book really challenged me because I had to draw out all the symbols myself. But, it was well worth it and I feel that this book is my biggest contribution to crochet yet.

 

UC: You’ve had a variety of roles in the crochet industry, including designer, writer, teacher, and social networker/community builder. What advice do you have for aspiring professionals?

Kim: I think the sweetheart, Margaret Hubert, put it best: “Don’t quit your day job.” While I have somehow been able to do these wonderful things as my career, as a single mother, it has been tough! There isn’t a lot of money in it. Most times, we’re just barely surviving and we’ve had to make numerous sacrifices. But, I wouldn’t trade it for anything. I’ve been able to stay at home with my kids and do a job that I love. I can’t think of a better way to go through life.

 

 

Luna Sweater. Photo (c) Interweave.

UC: What are your favorite crochet books in your collection (besides your own, of course)?

Kim: I am especially fond of the Japanese stitch pattern books. They have spent more time with me on the couch than in the book shelf.

 

UC: Do you have any crafty blogs or websites to share?

Kim: Well, I’m just going to look at my computer and see what websites I always have up there.

  • Yahoo Mail. Yep, always there.
  • Yahoo Groups. I’m a moderator of the Tunisian Crochet group, so I always have that up.
  • Facebook. Seriously, I think I would go into withdrawals if I didn’t have my Facebook peeps. 😉
  • Crochetville. Staying on top of the students’ questions for my classes and responding to any pattern questions asked in the forums.
  • Annie’s. Also, staying on top of the students’ questions. I like to respond to questions immediately. I respond as quickly as I possibly can. If I was doing a project, and I had a question, it would really be bothersome to have to set it down and wait for a week to get a response. Sometimes, it can’t be helped, but I really do my best to get to questions immediately.
  • Pinterest. Oh, the crochet pretties!
  • Tweetdeck: I like to stalk my friends. 🙂

 

Laced Cables, a pattern from Kim’s online Tunisian Cables and Lace class at Annie’s. Photo (c) Annie’s.

 

UC: You’ve been teaching online for years.  Tell me about your experiences as an online teacher. 

Kim: I prefer teaching online over teaching in live venues. Like I said, I’m a single mother. I have a small child. I want to stay home with him and I don’t want to leave him for a week at a time. Online teaching allows me to stay at home with him. But, it’s more than that. Online teaching gives me the opportunity to give well-thought-out answers to my students. And, I don’t walk out suddenly remembering that I forgot to teach something.

I have been teaching online for over 10 years. I’ve been teaching project classes, but I’ve just started adding some design classes to the mix which will begin in February at Crochetville.

 

Thank you for stopping by, Kim, and sharing your answers with us!