My 2013 temperature scarf pattern

Apparently, Honey Nutbrown‘s whole temperature scarf concept has really taken off.  Even Bernat, one of the larger North American yarn companies, has jumped on board with a year long KAL/CAL.

I’ve gotten quite a few questions about the stitch pattern I’m using for my crochet version, so I thought I’d share it.  I wanted the number of stitches (38) to match my age this year, so I combined elements of two different stitch patterns I liked in Margaret Hubert‘s The Complete Photo Guide to Crochet.

Underground Crafter’s crochet variant of the 2013 Temperature Scarf (conceived by Honey Nutbrown as a knitting project here)

First, choose a group of yarns and assign a set of temperature values to each yarn.  This will vary based on how many yarns you want to use as well as how dramatic annual temperature highs and lows are in your area.  Here’s my chart as an example.

Click to enlarge.
The yarns I'm using, arranged in temperature order, from top left to right and bottom left to right.

Use the same yarn for the foundation chain and Row 1.  For the rest of the project, change colors at the end of every row (or as often as dictated by the change in temperatures) by pulling the new color through the last slip stitch.  (Tip: Don’t fasten off at the end of the row until you know the next day’s temperature.  You may end up using the same yarn again, and you’ll have fewer ends to weave in!)

Abbreviations used in this pattern

  • blo – back loop only
  • ch(s) – chain(s)
  • dc(s) – double crochet(s)
  • ea – each
  • hdc(s) – half double crochet(s)
  • sc(s) – single crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sl st(s) – slip stitch(es)
  • st(s) – stitch(es)

Pattern stitch

Ch 39.

Row 1: Turn, sk first ch, sl st in ea of next 2 chs.  *Ch 2, sk 2 chs, sc in ea of  next 2 chs.*  Repeat from * across to last 4 sts, ch 2, sk 2 chs, sl st in ea of last 2 chs. (38 sts)

Row 2: Turn, ch 1, sl st in blo of ea of first 2 sts.  *Sc in ea of next 2 skipped chs from foundation ch, ch 2, sk 2 sts.*  Repeat from * across to last 4 sts, sc in ea of next 2 skipped chs from foundation ch, sl st in blo of ea of last 2 sts.

Row 3: Turn, ch 1, sl st in blo of ea of first 2 sts.  *Ch 2, sk 2 sts, sc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below.*  Repeat from * across to last 4 sts, ch 2, sk 2 sts, sl st in blo of ea of last 2 sts.

Row 4: Turn, ch 1, sl st in blo of ea of first 2 sts.  *Sc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below, ch 2, sk 2 sts.*  Repeat from * across to last 4 sts, sc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below, sl st in blo of ea of last 2 sts.

Repeat Rows 3 & 4.

I already mentioned that I may change the stitch length for each season.  Since I live in New York and we start the year in the winter, I used the single crochet to represent the short length of the day.  The length of the stitches will increase as the hours of darkness in the day decreases.

Spring and Fall hdc stitch pattern variation

Row 5: Turn, ch 1, sc in ea of first 2 sts.  *Ch 2, sk 2 sts, hdc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below.*  Repeat from * across to last 4 sts, ch 2, sk 2 sts, sc in ea of last 2 sts.

Row 6: Turn, ch 1, sc in ea of first 2 sts.  *Hdc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below, ch 2, sk 2 sts.*  Repeat from * across to last 4 sts, hdc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below, sc in ea of last 2 sts.

Repeat Rows 5 & 6.

Summer dc stitch pattern variation:

Row 7: Turn, ch 2 (counts as hdc), sk first st, hdc in 2nd st.  *Ch 2, sk 2 sts, dc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below.*  Repeat from * across to last 4 sts, ch 2, sk 2 sts, hdc in ea of last 2 sts.

Row 8: Turn, ch 2 (counts as hdc), sk first st, hdc in 2nd st.  *Dc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below, ch 2, sk 2 sts.*  Repeat from * across to last 4 sts, dc in ea of next 2 skipped sts from 2 rows below, hdc in ea of last 2 sts.

Repeat Rows 7 & 8.

 

Here’s my progress so far!

In case you’re wondering, I’ve already used 3 colors even though we’re only 21 days into the year!  That’s a little scary since each color represents 12 degrees of temperature.  And, I’ve yet to use the color representing the “coldest” temperatures, even though this is winter.

If you’re working on a temperature scarf, too, I’m looking forward to seeing how all of our projects turn out next year!

For more Works in Progress, visit Tami’s Amis.

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