Cricut Basics: Will I Use the Cricut Enough to Justify the Price? With 60+ Tutorials and Cut Files for Fabric and Yarn Lovers

Will I Use the Cricut Enough to Justify the Price? (with 60+ Projects and Tutorials for Fabric and Yarn Lovers) via Underground Crafter - Cricut machines aren't just for paper crafters. Check out over 60 tutorials, projects, and cut files for fabric, faux leather, and yarn.

I’m continuing my Cricut Basics series with a question that many crafters ask: Will I use the Cricut machine enough to justify the price? In this post, I’m going to answer the question specifically from the point of view of someone who isn’t a paper crafter and who enjoys working with fiber (fabric and yarn). I’ll also introduce a brand new Cricut product that may be right up your alley if you love to sew and quilt, and share a roundup of 60+ tutorials and cut files for fabric and yarn lovers.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links. Photos included in this roundup are copyright the individual designer/blogger and are used with permission. Materials for this post were generously provided by Cricut.

This question, obviously, is a bit more personal than some of the other ones Cricut newbies ask, but let me share what I’ve discovered after owning a Cricut Explore Air for about a year.

  • As I mention in this post, Cricut machines have multiple features including cutting, writing, print then cut, and scoring, so they are more than “just” cutting machines.
  • As a (mostly) fiber crafter, before I got my Explore Air, I assumed these were really machines for scrapbookers. Since then, I’ve learned that you can use a Cricut to cut fabric, make iron ons and stencils, write “handwritten” gift cards, cut and score gift boxes, and more. (I’ve included a roundup of over 60 Cricut projects and tutorials for fabric and yarn lovers at the end of this post so you can see for yourself what some of the non-paper possibilities are.)
  • Cricuts are great for last-minute gifts. As a crocheter, I don’t always have time to just “whip up” a scarf or hat, but I can add a quick touch of homemade to my gifts with a Make It Now project.
  • Like most crafts, the major costs are in the materials you use for projects. While the Cricut Explore machines seem pretty expensive up front (with retail prices starting at $149), I think of the Cricut like a sewing machine: a long term investment. You don’t need to buy cartridges or dies and you can keep costs low by designing your own projects with the beginner-friendly Design Space, uploading your own images, or by adapting free projects you find online.
  • Cricuts are often on sale. If you check Cricut, Amazon, Jo-Ann, or Michaels regularly, you can get a big discount on the machine, or be able to buy a bundle with lots of included supplies for the same retail price as the machine.


Only you can really answer how much you’ll use a Cricut. If you’re new to cutting machines, it may seem a really hard question to answer. (And, if you’re still considering which machine is right for you, you may want to check out this post.) But, I’ll close with a few reasons why I think you probably will use the machine enough to justify the price.

  • Cricut Design Space is very beginner friendly and there are lots of tutorials available, as well as a toll free hotline, to help out if you have questions. This means your machine won’t languish in the box because you’re afraid to use it.
  • With nice greeting cards now going for $4.99 and up, most of us could pay our machine off in a year or two in savings on greeting cards alone. My money-saving tip here is not to pull out the Cricut and make one card. Instead, take a little extra time and have a little stockpile of birthday, thank you, and holiday cards ready so you don’t end up buying something at the drug store at the last minute. If you have a medium to large family, this is a big money saver.
  • If you are a multi-crafter, you’ll find that having a Cricut opens up a lot of fun projects using your favorite materials, including paper, vinyl, fabric, yarn, and more.
  • When you’re feeling uninspired, you can search in Design Space for projects by cutting material. This can help you use up your existing materials stash of vinyl, faux leather, etc. instead of running out to buy more supplies.

If you’re wondering what supplies and tools you really need to use your Cricut (so you can calculate any other costs), check out this post.

Just as I was writing this post, Cricut announced a new machine launching on August 20, 2017. The Cricut Maker is designed for fiber lovers. It will use a rotary blade that can cut fabric without a stabilizer and has access to hundreds of digital sewing patterns.

In my opinion, this is kind of a game changer for fabric lovers who are on the fence about buying a Cricut. Read more about the Cricut Maker and how it compares to the Cricut Explore series here. Sweet Red Poppy just did a post introducing her new Cricut Maker (along with an adorable scissor pouch project) here. You can watch a video of the project being made below.

And, Hey Let’s Make Stuff has a post highlighting the differences between the Cricut Maker and the Cricut Explore machines here.

This brief promotional video from Cricut shows off some more of the features of the Cricut Maker.

While the Cricut maker has a higher retail price than other Cricut machines, it does have more features and can cut fabric without the use of a stabilizer, so it may be worth the higher cost to you.

I hope this post has helped you think through whether a Cricut is a worthwhile investment for you! (Probably yes, is my guess.) And, if you’re a yarn or fabric lover (or want to experiment with these materials), read on for my roundup of over 60 free Cricut projects and tutorials for fiber crafters.

60+ Cricut Projects and Tutorials for Fabric and Yarn Lovers

Roundup by Underground Crafter

Will I Use the Cricut Enough to Justify the Price? (with 60+ Projects and Tutorials for Fabric and Yarn Lovers) via Underground Crafter - Cricut machines aren't just for paper crafters. Check out over 60 tutorials, projects, and cut files for fabric, faux leather, and yarn.

Faux Leather Crafts

These eight tutorials use Cricut Faux Leather, which is available in a variety of colors, to make craft supplies organizers, accessories, ornaments, and baby gifts.

Will I Use the Cricut Enough to Justify the Price? (with 60+ Projects and Tutorials for Fabric and Yarn Lovers) via Underground Crafter - Cricut machines aren't just for paper crafters. Check out over 60 tutorials, projects, and cut files for fabric, faux leather, and yarn.Top row, from left to right:

Second row, from left to right:

Bottom row, from left to right:

No-Sew Fabric Crafts

If you’re looking for a no-sew Cricut project using fabric, here are over 16 projects and tutorials to get you started. Learn how to cut fabric and felt with the Cricut and find projects for home decor, accessories, baby gifts, stencils, and appliques.

Will I Use the Cricut Enough to Justify the Price? (with 60+ Projects and Tutorials for Fabric and Yarn Lovers) via Underground Crafter - Cricut machines aren't just for paper crafters. Check out over 60 tutorials, projects, and cut files for fabric, faux leather, and yarn.

Left column, from top to bottom:

Center column, from top to bottom:

Right column, from top to bottom:

Not pictured:

Sewing Fabric Crafts

These twenty-six Cricut fabric crafts for home decor, accessories, games, quilts, and garments include patterns or sewing tutorials.

Will I Use the Cricut Enough to Justify the Price? (with 60+ Projects and Tutorials for Fabric and Yarn Lovers) via Underground Crafter - Cricut machines aren't just for paper crafters. Check out over 60 tutorials, projects, and cut files for fabric, faux leather, and yarn.Left column, from left to right:

Second column, from left to right:

Third column, from left to right:

Fourth column, from left to right:

Right column, from left to right:

Not pictured:

Tools and Gifts for Fiber Lovers

These seventeen projects and cut files make great tools, decorations, and gifts for crocheters, knitters, sewists, and quilters.

Left column, from top to bottom:

Second column, from top to bottom:

Right column, from top to bottom:

Not pictured:

Yarn Crafts

And, let’s not forget the yarnies! These two free crochet patterns use heat transfer vinyl or iron-on for embellishment.

Will I Use the Cricut Enough to Justify the Price? (with 60+ Projects and Tutorials for Fabric and Yarn Lovers) via Underground Crafter - Cricut machines aren't just for paper crafters. Check out over 60 tutorials, projects, and cut files for fabric, faux leather, and yarn.

As you can see, there are plenty of great projects that even non-paper crafters can make with a Cricut machine. (And, sewing and quilting enthusiasts can make even more with the new Cricut Maker.) If you have another question about Cricut machines (or how to use them), let me know in the comments and I may answer it in an upcoming post.

 

Will I Use the Cricut Enough to Justify the Price? (with 60+ Projects and Tutorials for Fabric and Yarn Lovers) via Underground Crafter - Cricut machines aren't just for paper crafters. Check out over 60 tutorials, projects, and cut files for fabric, faux leather, and yarn.

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