Crochet Pattern: Ice Cream Socks (Part 1) by ACCROchet

Striped crochet socks next to 3 balls of yarn | Free crochet pattern: Ice Cream Socks, Part 1 by ACCROchet (with tips for first-time sock crocheters) on Underground CrafterI’m so excited to be sharing the first guest post in a 3-part series by Julie from ACCROchet. Julie will be sharing her premium crochet pattern for the Ice Cream Socks with us in parts. (If you’re impatient, you can go ahead and buy the pattern here.) In each post, she’ll also be sharing her best tips for first-time sock crocheters. If you’re a crochet socks newbie, this could be your time to get started on a pair of fun socks that you can actually wear inside your shoes!

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

LoveCrochet

About Julie Desjardins

Woman holding many crochet hooks in front of her face | Free crochet pattern: Ice Cream Socks, Part 1 by ACCROchet (with tips for first-time sock crocheters) on Underground CrafterIn French, ACCRO means addict. ACCROchet is therefore a play on words, to explain this crochet enthusiast’s main motivation. ACCROchet is Julie Desjardins, a bilingual French Canadian crochet designer, who obviously enjoys puns. Julie’s aim is to foster communities that value and recognize the artist’s talent, time, and tools, and that want to surround themselves in those same luxurious elements.

Show your support by following Julie on:

ACCROchet Website | Facebook Page | Facebook Group | Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter | Ravelry

Ice Cream Socks, Part I

Crochet Pattern (with tips for first time sock crocheters) by ACCROchet

Two photos of striped crochet socks | Woman holding many crochet hooks in front of her face | Free crochet pattern: Ice Cream Socks, Part 1 by ACCROchet (with tips for first-time sock crocheters) on Underground CrafterWhen I started crocheting socks, I discovered that just the idea of them sounded impossible to a lot of people. They would see me crocheting socks and tell me it couldn’t be done. They would see me wearing the crocheted socks I’d made and tell me that couldn’t be done.

  • The socks would be too thick.
  • They would fall down.
  • The yarn required was too thin for crochet.
  • They’d never seen any crocheted socks.

I’m an obstinate person. If I’m told I can’t do something, I want to do it that much more. And I am never more obstinate than when I’m told I can’t crochet something. So I crochet socks. I design crochet socks. I love crochet socks.

And yes, I wear crochet socks in my shoes.

If you’re still with me, let’s get to work. In this 3-part series we will discuss 3 topics: crochet sock best practices, toes, and heels.

  • Ice Cream Socks, Part 1: Best Practices for Crocheting Socks (you are here)
  • Ice Cream Socks, Part 2: Toes
  • Ice Cream Socks, Part 3: Heels

Striped crochet socks next to 3 balls of yarn | Free crochet pattern: Ice Cream Socks, Part 1 by ACCROchet (with tips for first-time sock crocheters) on Underground CrafterPart 1: Crochet Socks Best Practices

This is not because I am a crochet designer, but I will say that if you want to set yourself up for success in this endeavor, you should start with a well-written pattern.

A pattern has been proven to work at least once – and it will have likely been tested, tech edited, or both. Mine have been.

Once you have a pattern… follow it. That may sound obvious, but it isn’t. Trust what’s written until there is no way to trust it anymore (which shouldn’t happen). Chances are, even if you feel the pattern is wrong, or that what you’re doing makes no sense, you’ll get to the end and it will have worked.

Check your gauge. I can’t help you if you don’t. The way I do try to help is that my gauge info is actually based on the pattern as you work it. If measurements are reached, you can simply keep going. If not, you’ve wasted no more time than for a regular swatch.

In this case here, though, we will confirm gauge with a regular swatch so you can gather your materials before we get to part 2.

Not everyone has access to every single type of yarn, nor does everyone have the same yarn budget. Substituting what’s recommended in the pattern for another brand is very normal. Here are some things to remember when you substitute yarn:

Yarn used to crochet socks must contain nylon. Nylon is what makes your socks sturdy and lasting. A sock without nylon will lose its shape, and break apart quickly. Look for somewhere around 25% nylon. 10% is a bare minimum.

The rest of the fiber content should also be factored in. If you want your finished project to act like the designer’s, similar fiber content is as important as yarn weight. You won’t get silk to behave like cotton.

  • Work your socks in sections, to avoid the dreaded second. This will have the added benefit of ensuring that sections will match up: if you work both toe sections one after the other, you’ll probably be in the same mental state for each.

With all of this said, it’s time to gather your materials & check your swatch!

We will be working on the adult sizes of my Ice Cream socks pattern.

Striped crochet socks laid flat on wooden surface | Free crochet pattern: Ice Cream Socks, Part 1 by ACCROchet (with tips for first-time sock crocheters) on Underground CrafterNote from Underground Crafter: This pattern uses standard U.S. crochet pattern abbreviations. You can find a master list of abbreviations here.

Required materials:

  • 2.75mm hook (or hook needed to reach gauge)
  • Sport or DK weight yarn – 70g of each of 2 main colours (Cream & Gray) + 50g of the contrast colour (Pink)

I used Sandnes Garn Alpakka Strompegarn (details here). It’s a DK weight yarn in which the alpaca makes for a very very soft, thin yarn. If you have access to it, use it. Otherwise, check your gauge with a light DK or sport yarn.

  • 2 stitch markers in different colours
  • Scissors

Checking you gauge:

  • Ch 22
  • Row 1: Dc in 3rd ch from hook and ea ch across
  • Row 2: Ch 3, 2 dc in ea dc across.
  • Repeat Row 2 8 more times.
  • Measure your gauge away from the edges. You want to get 10 stitches and 6 rows for 2”. If that’s the case, you are good to go. If not, adjust your hook accordingly.

Next time I visit, we’ll discuss toes… and jump right into this new adventure of crocheting socks!

© 2018 by Julie Desjardins (ACCROchet) and published with permission by Underground Crafter. This pattern is for personal use only. You may use the pattern to make unlimited items for yourself, for charity, or to give as gifts. You may sell items you personally make by hand from this pattern. Do not violate Julie’s copyright by distributing this pattern or the photos in any form, including but not limited to scanning, photocopying, emailing, or posting on a website or internet discussion group. If you want to share the pattern, point your friends to this link: http://undergroundcrafter.com/blog/2018/02/16/crochet-pattern-ice-cream-socks-by-accrochet. Thanks for supporting indie designers!

Thank you, Julie, for sharing the Ice Cream Socks pattern with us! Show your support by visiting Julie at one of the following links:

ACCROchet Website | Facebook Page | Facebook Group | Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter | Ravelry

 

4 Comments

  1. Katy W
    February 17, 2018 / 8:47 pm

    I’m an avid crocheter of socks as well so much so that my name on Ravelry and Crochetville is Sockmad. The afterthought heel is my favorite style of sock and I have thick ankles so I don’t nip in as many a pattern suggests,I only wear Croc shoes as I have horrible heel spurs,I love the feel of the nubs of my shoes and socks working together. 🙂

  2. margaret maiss
    March 26, 2018 / 11:01 pm

    I am so happy to have this pattern, I have been suffering from a severe shoulder injury and am now ready to start crocheting again, this will be the project I will be working on.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *